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Commercial Yacht Code

May 17, 2009 by sailor

THE REPUBLIC OF THE MARSHALL ISLANDS

COMMERCIAL YACHT CODE

REASONS FOR REGISTERING A YACHT UNDER THE MARSHALL ISLANDS FLAG:

The Maritime Administration considers a private yacht to be any yacht not carrying passengers for hire, or engaged in trade or commerce, being used solely for the pleasure or recreational purposes of its owner and carrying no more than 12 passengers.

The registration of private yachts is limited to those of 12 meters or more in length. The Maritime Administrator may consider waiving the minimum size limitations and other requirements for private yachts. The Marshall Islands Commercial Yacht Code should be used as a basis to measure the safety, lifesaving and fire-fighting equipment of a private yacht.

Marshall Islands yacht recordation procedures, documentation, preferred mortgage standards and administrative controls are recognized by international lending institutions.

Yacht ownership can be as a Marshall Islands corporation, limited liability company, partnership, or foreign maritime entity qualified in the Marshall Islands.

Marshall Islands law statutorily exempts non-resident yacht-owning corporations from taxes. Corporate documents do not require expensive consular signatures, and there are no requirements for annual filings.

International Registries, Inc. (IRI) and its group of affiliated companies offer a full range of yacht and corporate services, including registration and mortgage recordation, crew licensing, radio station licensing, yacht inspections and technical assistance.

The Marshall Islands was ranked the top open ship registry for 1999 due to its outstanding safety and port state control performance. This emphasis on quality and safety will also be a cornerstone of the Marshall Islands Yacht Registry.

Inquiries from yacht owners and operators will be promptly handled by IRI’s highly skilled staff which includes master mariners, naval engineers, nautical inspectors, former U.S. Coast Guard Officers, ship radio and crewing specialists, as well as legal and corporate professionals.

WORLDWIDE CLASSIFICATION OF VESSEL

All commercial vessels are required to be classed by a Classification Society that is recognized by the Maritime Administrator (some exceptions may be made for yachts and fishing vessels; contact IRI for specifics). The following are currently recognized:
American Bureau of Shipping (ABS)
Bureau Veritas (BV)
China Classification Society (CCS)
Det Norske Veritas (DNV)
Germanischer Lloyd (GL)
Korean Register of Shipping (KRS)
Lloyd’s Register (LR)
Nippon Kaiji Kyokai (NKK)
Registro Italiano Navale (RINA)
Russian Maritime Register of Shipping (RS)

NOTICE

This complimentary printing of the Commercial Yacht Code will not be automatically supplemented, and therefore may be out of date.

The updated version of this publication may be found on our website http://www.register-iri.com in the Combined Publications Folder (CPF), MI-300, the CD of which is required to be carried on board every Marshall Islands vessel.

A copy of the CPF, MI-300, with automatic updating service, may be ordered from:

Publications
Office of the Maritime Administrator
c/o Marshall Islands Maritime and Corporate Administrators, Inc.
11495 Commerce Park Drive
Reston, Virginia 20191-1507 USA
Telephone: +1-703-620-4880
Telefax: +1-703-476-8522
Email: publications@register-iri.com

INTERNATIONAL REGISTRIES, INC.
Reference MI-103 COMMERCIAL YACHT CODE Section IRH
Author YARCC Page 1 of 1
Revision 1
Issued 11 November 2008
SUBJECT: ISSUE AND REVISION HISTORY
REV DATE mm/dd/yy DESCRIPTION APPROVED BY ENTERED BY ENTERED mm/dd/yy
1 11/11/08 Annex 4: numbered paragraphs and replaced previous 7th paragraph with new paragraphs 1.7 & 1.8 (page 99); corrected deck ratings and engine personnel requirements in Category 2 in table on page 100 & deleted previous page 101 containing table on MI Yacht Certificates of Competency; updated TOC to reflect repagination. T. F. Heinan T. F. Heinan 11/11/08
- 10/15/08 Original T. F. Heinan T. F. Heinan 10/15/08

TABLE OF CONTENTS

THE COMMERCIAL YACHT CODE

1.0 INTRODUCTION 1
1.1 General 1
1.2 Registration Documentation 2
1.3 Application 2
1.4 Ownership 2
1.5 Insurance 2
1.6 Home Port 2
1.7 Issuance of Certificates of Registry 2
2.0 DEFINITIONS 3
3.0 APPLICATION and INTERPRETATION 11
3.1 Application 11
3.1.1 Effective date 11
3.1.2 Large Commercial Yachts 11
3.1.3 Large Private Yachts 13
3.1.4 Hull types 13
3.1.5 Responsibility 13
3.2 Operational Limitations 13
3.3 Equivalent Standards, Exemptions and Existing Yachts 13
3.3.1 Equivalent standards 13
3.3.2 Exemptions 14
3.3.3 Existing yachts 14
3.4 Interpretation and Appeal Process 14
3.4.1 Interpretation 14
3.4.2 Appeal Process 14
3.5 Review and Revision of the Code 15
3.6 Tonnage Measurement 15
3.7 Simplified Tonnage Measurement Method 15
4.0 CONSTRUCTION and STRENGTH 15
4.1 General Requirements 15
4.2 Structural Strength 16
4.2.1 New yachts 16
4.2.2 Existing yachts 16
4.3 Recesses 16
4.4 Watertight Bulkheads 17
4.4.1 New yachts 17
4.4.2 Existing yachts 17
4.5 Enclosed Compartments within the Hull and below the Freeboard Deck provided with Access through Openings in the Hull 17
4.6 Sailing Yacht Rigging 18
4.6.1 General Maintenance 18
4.6.2 Masts and spars 18
4.6.3 Running and standing rigging 18
4.6.4 Sails 19

5.0 WEATHERTIGHT INTEGRITY 19
5.1 Hatchways and Skylight Hatches 19
5.1.1 General requirements 19
5.1.2 Hatchways that are open at sea 20
5.2 Doorways and Companionways 20
5.2.1 Doorways located above the weather deck 20
5.2.2 Companion hatch openings 21
5.3 Skylights 21
5.4 Side Scuttles 21
5.5 Windows 22
5.6 Ventilators and Exhausts 22
5.7 Air Pipes 23
5.8 Scuppers, Sea Inlets and Discharges 23
5.9 Materials for Valves and Associated Piping 24
5.10 General Equivalence. 24
6.0 WATER FREEING ARRANGEMENTS 24
7.0 MACHINERY 25
7.1 Yachts of less than 500 GT. 25
7.1.1 General Requirements 25
7.1.2 Installation 26
7.2 Yachts of 500 GT and over 26
8.0 ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS 26
8.1 Yachts of less than 500 GT 26
8.1.1 General Requirements 26
8.1.2 Installation 27
8.1.3 Emergency Lighting 27
8.1.4 Batteries 27
8.1.5 Battery Storage 27
8.1.6 Flammable Gases 27
8.2 Yachts of 500 GT and over 27
8.2.1 General Requirements 27
8.2.2 Emergency Power Source 28
8.2.3 Flammable Gases 28
9.0 STEERING GEAR 28
9.1 Yachts of less than 500 GT 28
9.1.1 General Requirements 28
9.1.2 Rudder Steering Systems 28
9.1.3 Emergency Steering 29
9.2 Yachts of 500 GT and over 29
9.2.1 General Requirements 29
9.2.2 Emergency Steering 29
10.0 BILGE PUMPING 29
10.1 Yachts of less than 500 GT 29
10.1.1 General Requirements 29
10.1.2 Pumps 29
10.1.3 Unmanned Machinery Spaces 30
10.1.4 Pumping and Piping Arrangements 30
10.2 Yachts of 500 GT and over 30
11.0 STABILITY – Intact and Damaged 31
11.1 General 31
11.2 Intact Stability 31
11.2.1 New motor yachts 31
11.2.2 Existing motor yachts 33
11.2.3 New sailing yachts 33
11.2.4 Existing sailing yachts 34
11.3 Damaged Stability 35
11.3.1 General 35
11.3.2 New yachts 35
11.3.3 Existing yachts 36
11.4 Elements of Stability 37
11.5 Stability Documents 37
11.6 Major Refit or Alterations 38
12.0 FREEBOARD 39
12.1 General 39
12.2 Freeboard Mark and Loading 39
12.3 Draft Marks 40
12.4 Docking Plan 40
13.0 LIFE-SAVING APPLIANCES 40
13.1 General Requirements 40
13.2 Equipment Carriage Requirements 42
13.2.1 Lifeboats 42
13.2.2 Life rafts 43
13.2.3 Rescue boats 45
13.2.4 Lifejackets 46
13.2.5 Immersion suits 46
13.2.6 Thermal protective aids 46
13.2.7 Life buoys 46
13.2.8 Line Throwing Appliance 47
13.2.9 EPIRB 47
13.2.10 Radar transponders (SART) 47
13.2.11 General alarm 47
13.2.12 Lighting 47
13.2.13 Life-Saving signals and rescue poster 47
14.0 FIRE SAFETY AND STRUCTURAL FIRE PROTECTION 48
14.1 Fire Safety 48
14.1.1 Stowage of Gasoline and other highly flammable liquids 48
14.1.2 Fire Control Plans 49
14.2 Structural fire protection for yachts of less than 500 GT 49
14.2.1 Boundaries 49
14.2.2 Fuel tanks/systems 50
14.2.3 Ventilation 50
14.2.4 Means of Escape 50
14.2.5 Passage of Flame 51
14.2.6 Thermal or Acoustic Insulation 51
14.2.7 Paints, Varnishes and Other Finishes 51
14.2.8 Upholstery Composites 51
14.2.9 Open Flame Gas Appliances 51
14.2.10 Fire Detection and Fire Alarm System 52
14.2.11 Ventilation Trunking 52
14.3 Structural fire protection for yachts of 500 GT and over 52
14.3.1 Definitions 52
14.3.2 Existing Yachts 53
14.3.3 New Yachts 53
14.3.3.1 Ventilation systems 53
14.3.3.2 Structure 55
14.3.3.3 Main vertical zones and horizontal zones 56
14.3.3.4 Bulkheads within a main vertical zone 56
14.3.3.5 Fire integrity of bulkheads and decks 57
14.3.3.6 Means of escape 60
14.3.3.7 Protection of stairways and lifts in accommodation and service spaces 61
14.3.3.8 Openings in “A” class divisions 62
14.3.3.9 Openings in “B” class divisions 62
14.3.3.10 Windows and side scuttles (Also see Sections 5.4 and 5.5) 63
14.3.3.11 Restricted use of combustible materials 63
14.3.3.12 Details of construction 64
14.3.3.13 Fixed fire detection and fire alarm systems and automatic sprinkler, fire detection and fire alarm systems 64
14.3.3.14 Fire detection and alarms 65
15.0 FIRE APPLIANCES 65
15.1 Yachts of less than 500 GT 65
15.1.1 General Requirements 65
15.1.2 Specific Requirements 65
15.1.2.1 Provision of water jet 65
15.1.2.2 Fire pumps 66
15.1.2.3 Fire main and hydrants 67
15.1.2.4 Fire hoses 67
15.1.2.5 Portable fire extinguishers for use in accommodation and service spaces 68
15.1.2.6 Fire extinguishing in machinery spaces 68
15.2 Yachts 500 GT and over 68
15.2.1 Existing Yachts 68
15.2.2 New Yachts 68
16.0 RADIO 69
16.1 General 69
16.1.1 Global Marine Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) 69
16.1.2 Automatic Identification System (AIS) 69
16.1.3 Long-Range Identification and Tracking (LRIT) 69
16.2 Radio Station Equipment 69
16.2.1 Installations 69
16.2.2 Operational performance 70
16.2.3 Location, protection and markings 70
16.2.4 Sources of energy 71
16.3 Watches 71
16.4 Radio personnel 71
17.0 NAVIGATION LIGHTS, SHAPES and SOUND SIGNALS 71
18.0 NAVIGATIONAL EQUIPMENT and WHEELHOUSE VISIBILITY 72
18.1 Navigational Equipment 72
18.2 Wheelhouse Visibility 72
19.0 MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT 72
19.1 Publications 72
19.2 Signaling Lamp 73
19.3 Instruments 74
19.4 Searchlight 74
20.0 ANCHORS, CABLES and TOWING ARRANGEMENTS 74
20.1 Equipment 74
20.2 Sailing Yachts 74
20.3 Towing Arrangements 74
21.0 ACCOMMODATIONS 74
21.1 General 74
21.2 Access/Escape Arrangements 75
21.3 Lighting 75
21.4 Heating 75
21.5 Food Preparation and Storage 75
21.6 Hand Holds and Grab Rails 75
21.7 Ventilation 75
21.8 Water Services 76
21.9 Sleeping Accommodation 76
21.10 Toilet Facilities 76
21.11 Stowage Facilities for Personal Effects 76
21.12 Securing of Heavy Equipment 76
21.13 Elevators (Lifts), Escalators and Other Accommodation Lifting Devices 76
22.0 PROTECTION OF PERSONNEL 77
22.1 Deckhouses and Superstructures 77
22.2 Bulwarks and Guard Rails 77
22.3 Safe Work Aloft and on the Bowsprit of Sailing Yachts 77
22.4 Recovery of Persons from the Sea 78
22.5 Personal Clothing 78
22.6 Noise 78
22.7 Training Manual 79
22.8 Safety Briefing 80
22.9 Instructions for on-board maintenance 80
22.10 Safety Management System 81
22.10.1 Yachts of less than 500 GT 81
22.10.2 Yachts of 500 GT and over 81
22.11 Ship Security System 81
23.0 MEDICAL STORES 81
24.0 SHIP-SHORE TRANSFER of PERSONNEL 81
24.1 Tenders 81
24.2 Helicopters 82
24.3 Harbor Pilots for Yachts 82
24.4 Gangways and Accommodation Ladders 82

25.0 POLLUTION PREVENTION 82
25.1 MARPOL. 82
25.1.1 Annex I – Oil 82
25.1.2 Annex IV – Sanitation 83
25.1.3 Annex V – Garbage 83
25.1.4 Annex VI – Prevention of Air Pollution from Ships 83
25.2 The International Convention on the Control of Harmful Anti-Fouling Systems on Ships 83
25.3 Coastal State Regulations 83
26.0 MANNING AND CERTIFICATION 84
26.1 Owners Responsibility 84
26.2 Requirements 84
26.3 Radio Qualifications 84
26.4 Medical Fitness Certificates 84
26.5 Basic Training Certification 85
26.6 First Aid Certification 85
26.7 Fire Fighting Course 85
26.8 Revalidation of Certificates and Licenses 85
27.0 PASSENGERS 86
27.1 Limitations 86
27.2 Definitions 86
28.0 RECOGNIZED ORGANIZATIONS 87
28.1 Recognized Classification Societies 87
28.2 Classification Society Surveyor 87
28.3 Appointed Representatives 87
29.0 SURVEYS, CERTIFICATION, and INSPECTIONS 88
29.1 General 88
29.1.1 International Conventions 88
29.1.2 Survey Standards 89
29.1.3 Survey Requests 89
29.2 Initial Survey (including newbuilding commercial yachts) 89
29.2.1 General 89
29.2.2 Load Line Certificate 89
29.2.3 Document of Compliance (Yacht of less than 500 gross tons) 90
29.2.4 Cargo Ship Safety Construction Certificate (Yacht of 500 gross tons
and over) 90
29.2.5 Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate (Yacht of 500 gross tons
and over) 90
29.2.6 Cargo Ship Safety Radio Certificate (Yacht of 300 gross tons and over) 90
29.2.7 LRIT Conformance Test Report Certificate (Yachts of 300 gross tons
and over) 90
29.2.8 International Safety Management Certificates (Yacht of 500 gross tons
and over) 90
29.2.9 International Ship and Port Facility Security Certificates (Yacht of
300 gross tons and over) 90
29.2.10 International Oil Pollution Prevention Certificate (Yacht of 400 gross tons
and over) 91
29.2.11 International Sewage Pollution Prevention Certificate 91
29.2.12 Prevention of Air Pollution from Ships 91
29.2.13 International Anti-Fouling Certificate 91
29.2.14 International Tonnage Certificate 91
29.2.15 Crew accommodation 92
29.2.16 Exemption from certain safety regulations 92
29.3 Periodic Surveys 92
29.3.1 Load Line Certificates, Cargo Ship Safety Construction Certificates and Documents of Compliance 92
29.3.2 Cargo Ship Safety Equipment and Safety Radio Certificates 92
29.3.3 Administration Safety Inspections and Document of Compliance 92
30.0 ACCIDENT INVESTIGATIONS 93
ANNEX 1 GUIDELINES FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF VARIATIONS TO THE STANDARDS APPLIED BY THE CODE 94
ANNEX 2 SIMPLIFIED TONNAGE MEASUREMENT METHOD 95
ANNEX 3 OPEN-FLAME GAS INSTALLATIONS 97
ANNEX 4 MINIMUM MANNING LEVELS FOR COMMERCIAL YACHTS OVER 24M 99
ANNEX 5 LIST OF CERTIFICATES TO BE ISSUED 101
ANNEX 6 DOCUMENT OF COMPLIANCE – COMMERCIAL YACHT 103
ANNEX 7 DOCUMENT OF COMPLIANCE – PRIVATE YACHT 105
ANNEX 8 COMMERCIAL YACHT PERMANENT CERTIFICATE OF REGISTRY 107
ANNEX 9 CERTIFICATE OF MEDICAL FITNESS 108
ANNEX 10 MARSHALL ISLANDS MARINE GUIDELINE 7-42-1, SHIP’S MEDICINE CHEST 110
ANNEX 11 PRIVATE YACHT CERTIFICATE OF REGISTRY 131
ANNEX 12 PRIVATE YACHT DECLARATION OF PRIVATE USE 132
ANNEX 13 SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM FOR YACHTS UNDER 500 GT 134

COMMERCIAL YACHT CODE

1.0 INTRODUCTION

1.1 General

This Commercial Yacht Code (the Code) makes reference to the Maritime Regulations of the Republic of the Marshall Islands. Vessels registered in the flag are required to comply with the various Maritime Regulations of the Administration that are relevant to the class of vessel to which they belong. However, the Administration has recognized that yachts in commercial use for sport or pleasure (commercial yachts) do not fall naturally into a single class, and certain prescribed merchant ship safety standards have been found to be incompatible with the intended use, scope of operations or safety needs particular to such yachts.

Likewise, yachts in private use for sport or pleasure (private yachts) are confronted with similar circumstances where safety standards compatible with the intended use, scope of operations or safety needs of such yachts have not been well defined by the Administration. It is recommended that private yachts use this Code as guidance to reasonably comply with the standards of this Code to the extent possible. Where the owner of a Private yacht wishes to comply with the provisions of this code and be issued evidence of that compliance, please see Annex 8 Private Yacht Document of Compliance that can be issued for such yachts.

The primary purpose in the Administration’s development of this Code has been to set standards of safety and protection for all persons on board yachts, particularly for those who are trainees, passengers or guests. The level of safety it sets out to achieve is considered to be commensurate with the current expectations of the general public. The Code relates especially to the construction of a yacht, its machinery, equipment and stability and to the correct operation of a yacht so that safety standards are maintained.

It will be noted that the Code deals with the equally important subjects of manning and of the qualifications needed for the senior members of the crew.

Designers and builders of new yachts will need to pay special regard to the intended area of operation and the working conditions to which a yacht will be subjected when selecting the materials and equipment to be used in its construction. The builder, repairer, owner or managing agent of a yacht, as appropriate, should take all reasonable measures to ensure that a material or appliance fitted in accordance with the requirements of the Code is suitable for the purpose intended having regard to its location in the yacht, the area of operation and the weather conditions which may be encountered.

When equipment manufactured in accordance with a recognized national or international standard is required by the Code, the Administration may accept existing equipment, provided it can be shown that the specification or technical description of the equipment provides, in use, equivalent levels of safety, suitability and fitness for purpose and does not constitute a risk to the yacht or its crew and passengers. Such equipment, when replaced, should be to the standard required by the Code.

Compliance with the Code in no way obviates the need for yachts and/or Masters to comply with local authority licensing, permit or regulatory requirements where applicable.

This Code has been updated by the Administration’s Yacht Appointed Representatives Consultative Committee (YARCC) with the additional assistance of other prominent members of the Yachting Industry.

1.2 Registration Documentation

Commercial yachts are registered under the Laws of the Republic in the same manner as any other vessel engaged in foreign trade. The standard application requirements outlined in the publication Vessel Registration and Mortgage Recordation (MI-100) apply, except for classification as indicated in Paragraph D below and registration fees as listed in Paragraph M below.

1.3 Application

To the Administration, any pleasure yacht engaged in trade, commerce, on charter or carrying passengers for consideration in any form is a commercial yacht. The registration of commercial yachts is limited to those of 24 meters or more in length. The Maritime Administrator may, however, consider waiving the minimum size limitation and other requirements for commercial yachts less than 24 meters in length given the necessary justification.

1.4 Ownership

A Marshall Islands citizen or national or a qualified foreign maritime entity must own the vessel. The term “citizen” or “national” includes Marshall Islands corporations, limited liability companies, partnerships, limited partnerships and associations of individuals.

1.5 Insurance

It is important to stress that, while all reasonable measures have been taken to develop standards in the Code that will result in the production of safe yachts, total safety at sea can never be guaranteed. As a consequence, the owner or managing agent of a yacht should take out a policy of insurance for hull and machinery and for third party liability and all persons who are part of the yacht’s complement from time to time. Such insurance should provide cover that is reasonable for claims that may arise. Commercial yacht owners or managing agents must comply with Marshall Islands Maritime Regulations 2.23.2, 7.48 and 7.50. A copy of the certificate of insurance should be either displayed or available for inspection by persons on board the yacht. Evidence of such insurance will also be required at registration.

1.6 Home Port

An Owner may select Jaluit or Bikini, Republic of the Marshall Islands, as the home port for commercial yachts.

1.7 Issuance of Certificates of Registry

.1 Commercial Yacht Certificate of Registry: Issuance of a Commercial Yacht Certificate of Registry is subject to the satisfaction of documentation requirements outlined in the publication Vessel Registration and Mortgage Recordation (MI-100), as modified above.

.2 Revalidation: Although issued without an expiration date, the Commercial Yacht Permanent Certificate of Registry is subject to annual revalidation. The continued validity of the Commercial Yacht Permanent Certificate of Registry is contingent upon the following requirements being met by the yacht owner or operator:

(a) maintaining good standing of the owning entity in the Marshall Islands;

(b) paying annual tonnage taxes and all other fees or assessments when due;

(c) retaining current classification status and valid Convention certificates or National Document of Compliance, as applicable;

(d) submitting to the Maritime Administrator each year a satisfactory Report, or Statement of Compliance.

.3 A current tonnage tax receipt must be maintained with the Commercial Yacht Permanent Certificate of Registry for the certificate to be considered valid.

2.0 DEFINITIONS

The following terms are used in the Code for which these definitions apply:

“Administration” with regard to this Code and the flag the yacht is entitled to fly, means the Republic of the Marshall Islands, Office of the Maritime Administrator, Reston, Virginia, USA, or an Agent formally authorized or appointed by the Maritime Administrator to represent or act on its behalf;

“Annual Survey” means a general or partial examination of the yacht, its machinery, fittings and equipment, as far as can readily be seen, to ascertain that it has been satisfactorily maintained as required by the Code and that the arrangements, fittings and equipment provided are as documented in the yacht’s Document of Compliance;

“Approved” in respect to materials or equipment means approved by the Administration or approved by another administration or an organization that is formally recognized by the Administration as its appointed representative in accordance with Marshall Islands Marine Notice 2-011-5;
“Appointed Representative” means a Recognized Organization or other entity accepted by the Administration to represent or act on its behalf with regard to the conduct of specified reviews, surveys, audits, and/or issue of certification in accordance with the guidelines of IMO Resolution A739(18) (see Section 28.0);
“Authorized Surveyor” means an independent surveyor who by reason of professional qualifications, practical experience and expertise is authorized by the Administration or Appointed Representative to carry out surveys required for yachts under Section 29.0+ of this Code;

“Bareboat or Demise Charter” means a charter under which the charterer provides the Master and the crew and assumes full responsibility for the operational management and control of the yacht;

“BS” means British Standard;

“Cargo” means all items of value that are carried from one place and discharged at another place and for which either a charge or no charge is made and is not for use exclusively onboard or with the yacht;

“Charter” means an agreement between the owner or managing agent and another party that allows that party, referred to as the “charterer”, to use the yacht;

“Classification Society” or “Class” means a ship Classification Society, which the Administration has accepted as a Recognized Organization for the survey and certification of yachts in accordance with the guidelines of IMO Resolution A.739(18);

“CEN” means European Committee for Standardization;

“Code” means the Republic of the Marshall Islands Commercial Yacht Code (MI-103);

“Commercial yacht” means a pleasure yacht engaged in trade, commerce, on charter or carrying up to 12 passengers for hire that is registered under Chapter 2, Part I, of the Marshall Islands Maritime Act 1990, as amended, and is described in the register and on the Certificate of Registry as a commercial yacht and is not a private yacht;

“Compartment” means all living and working spaces within the watertight or fire-resisting boundaries on any one level that have inter-communicating access;

“Compliance Survey” means an examination by an Appointed Representative, to ascertain that the yacht’s structure, machinery, equipment and fittings are in compliance with the requirements of the Code that shall result in the issuance and/or endorsement of statutory certificates on behalf of the Administration.

“Control stations” mean a conning position that is continuously manned while the yacht is under way and those spaces in which the yacht’s radio or main navigating equipment or the emergency source of power is located or where the fire recording or fire control equipment is centralized;

“Crew” means a person employed or engaged in any capacity on board a yacht on the business of the yacht;

“Date of expiry” in relation to pyrotechnics and self-activating smoke signals means a date within three (3) years from the date of manufacture of that product;

“Daylight” means one (1) hour before sunrise until one (1) hour after sunset;

“Decked yacht” means a yacht with a continuous watertight weather deck that extends from stem to stern and has positive freeboard throughout in any condition of loading;

“Declared Area(s) of Operation” are those areas designated by the owner or managing agent to which the yacht would be limited for registration and safety certification purposes;

“Downflooding Angle” is the angle of heel, at which openings in the hull, superstructure, or deckhouses, which cannot be, closed weathertight immerse. In applying this criterion, small openings through which progressive flooding cannot take place need not be considered as open.

“Efficient” in relation to a fitting, piece of equipment or material means that all reasonable and practicable measures have been taken to ensure that it is suitable for the purpose for which it is intended to be used;

“Emergency condition” is a condition under which any services needed for normal operational and habitable conditions are not in working order due to failure of the main source of electrical power;

“Emergency source of electrical power” is a source of electrical power, intended to supply the emergency switchboard in the event of failure of the supply from the main source of electrical power;

“Emergency switchboard” is a switchboard that in the event of failure of the main electrical power supply system is directly supplied by the emergency source of electrical power or the transitional source of emergency power and is intended to distribute electrical energy to the emergency services;

“EN” means European Standard;

“EPIRB” means a satellite emergency position-indicating radio beacon, being an earth station in the mobile-satellite service, the emissions of which are intended to facilitate search and rescue operations, complying with performance standards adopted by the IMO, and is capable of:

(a) floating free and automatically activating if the yacht sinks;
(b) being manually activated; and
(c) being carried by one (1) person;

“Existing commercial yacht” means any yacht which is registered under Chapter 2, Part I, of the Marshall Islands Maritime Act 1990, as amended, and is described in the register and on the Certificate of Registry as a commercial yacht, the keel of which was laid or the construction or lay up was started before this revised edition of the Code was put into force;

“Excursion” means a trip of limited duration operating in a restricted area within close proximity to shore originating from the nominated departure point, in favorable weather conditions and subject to sufficient life saving appliances being provided. No passengers would be berthed on board during this time.

“Favorable weather” means wind, sea and visibility, having given due regard to official weather forecasts for the service area of the yacht, or any other conditions existing throughout a voyage or excursion in which the effects of either individually or in combination of swells, height of waves, strength of wind and visibility are deemed by the Master to be safe for a yacht to operate within the limits applied to it;

“Float-free launching” means that method of launching a life raft or EPIRB whereby the life raft or EPIRB is automatically released from a sinking yacht and is ready for use or activated;

“Freeboard” has the meaning given in Annex I of the ILLC viz. The freeboard assigned is the distance measured vertically downwards amidships from the lowest point of the upper edge of the weather deck line to the upper edge of the related load line or the waterline in still water;

“Freeboard deck” has the meaning given in Annex I of the ILLC viz. In general, the freeboard deck is normally the uppermost complete deck exposed to the weather and sea, which has permanent means of closing all openings in the weather part thereof, and below which all openings in the sides of the yacht are fitted with permanent means of watertight closing.

“Garbage” means all kinds of victual, domestic and operational waste excluding fresh fish and parts thereof and sewage, generated during the normal operation of the yacht and liable to be disposed of continuously or periodically originating from yachts;

“Helicopter Deck (Helideck)” means a purpose built helicopter landing area on a yacht including all structure, fire fighting appliances and other equipment necessary for the safe operations of helicopters.

“Helicopter Facility” means a helideck including any refueling and hanger facility.

“IEC” means International Electrotechnical Commission;

“ILLC” means the International Convention on Load Lines, 1996, as amended;

“Immediate Family” means, in relation to an individual, the spouse of that individual, a relative of that individual and a relative of the spouse of that individual;

“IMO” means the International Maritime Organization (www.imo.org), a specialized agency of the United Nations devoted to maritime affairs;

“Inflated boat” means a boat complying with the requirements of Section 13.2.3 and suitable for rescuing persons in distress and for marshalling life rafts;

“Instructions for on-board maintenance” means the instructions complying with the requirements of Section 22.9;

“ISO” means International Organization for Standardization (www.iso.org/iso/);

“Launching appliance” means a provision for safely transferring a lifeboat, rescue boat, life raft or inflated boat respectively, from its stowed position to the water and recovery where applicable;

“Lifeboat” means a lifeboat complying with the requirements of the LSA Code;

“Life buoy” means a life buoy complying with the requirements of the LSA Code;

“Life jacket” means a life jacket complying with the requirements of the LSA Code;

“Life raft” means a life raft complying with the requirements of the LSA Code;

“Line throwing appliance” means an appliance complying with the requirements of the LSA Code;

“Load Line Length” means 96% of the total length on the waterline of a yacht at 85% of the least molded depth measured from the top of the keel, or the length from the fore-side of the stem to the axis of the rudder stock on that waterline, if that be greater. In yachts designed with a rake of keel, the waterline on which this is measured shall be parallel to the designed waterline;

“Low flame spread” means that the surface thus described will adequately restrict the spread of flame, this being determined to the satisfaction of an Appointed Representative of the Administration by an established procedure;

“LSA Code” means the IMO International Life-Saving Appliances Code;

“Machinery spaces” are all machinery spaces of Category A and all other spaces containing propelling machinery, boilers, oil fuel units, steam and internal combustion engines, generators and major electrical machinery, oil filling stations, refrigerating, stabilizing, ventilation and air conditioning machinery, and similar spaces, and trunks to such spaces;

“Machinery spaces of Category A” are those spaces and trunks to such spaces that contain:

(a) internal combustion machinery used for main propulsion; or

(b) internal combustion machinery used for purposes other than main propulsion where such machinery has in the aggregate a total power output of not less than 375 kW; or

(c) any oil fuel unit;

“Main generating station” is the space in which the main source of electrical power is situated;

“Main source of electrical power” is a source intended to supply electrical power to the main switchboard for distribution to all services necessary for maintaining the yacht in normal operational and habitable condition;

“Main steering gear” is the machinery, rudder actuators, steering gear power units, if any, and ancillary equipment and the means of applying torque to the rudder stock (e.g. tiller or quadrant) necessary for effecting movement of the rudder for the purpose of steering the yacht under normal service conditions;

“Main switchboard” is a switchboard that is directly supplied by the main source of electrical power and is intended to distribute electrical energy to the yacht’s services;

“Main vertical zone” means those sections into which the hull, superstructure and deckhouses are divided by “A” class divisions, the mean length of which on any deck does not normally exceed 40 meters;

“Maritime Administrator” means the Republic of the Marshall Islands Maritime Administrator, which is appointed by the Cabinet of the Republic of the Marshall Islands. The Maritime Administrator administers to all matters pertaining to vessels of the Republic engaged in foreign trade and/or that are subject to the provisions of the Marshall Islands Maritime Act 1990, as amended, and is empowered to promulgate Rules and Regulations to carry out the provisions of the Maritime Act and to ensure the seaworthiness of ships of the Republic and proper manning conditions on board;

“MARPOL” means the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, 1973, as amended;

“Maximum ahead service speed” for the purpose of steering gear and rudder stock and pintle design, is the maximum contractual speed of the yacht, in knots;

“Maritime Regulations” means the Marshall Islands Maritime Regulations (MI-108), a publication promulgated by the Office of the Maritime Administrator;

“Mile” means a nautical mile of 1852 meters;

“Motor yacht” means a pleasure yacht which is described in the register and on the Certificate of Registry as such, and which has as a sole means of propulsion either one (1) or more power units;

“Multihull yacht” means any yacht that in any normally achievable operating trim or heel angle has a rigid hull structure, which penetrates the surface of the sea over more than one (1) separate or discrete area;

“New yacht” means a yacht to which this Code applies, the keel of which was laid or the construction or lay up was started on or after this revised edition of the Code was put into force;

“Not readily ignitable” means that the surface thus described will not continue to bum for more than 20 seconds after removal of a suitable impinging test flame;

“Operated on a commercial basis” means persons or a company other than the owner, or the immediate family of the owner that is financing the operation of the yacht either wholly or in part;

“Owner(s) or managing agent(s)” means the registered owner(s) or the managing agent(s) of the registered owner(s) as the case may be;

“Passenger” (See Section 27.2, Definitions);

“Passenger ship” means a vessel carrying more than 12 passengers;

“Person” means a person over the age of one (1) year;
“Private Yacht” means any pleasure yacht not on charter or carrying passengers for hire, not engaged in trade or commerce, and being used solely for the pleasure or recreational purposes of its owner. More specifically, to be considered a private yacht, the yacht is:

(a) in the case of a yacht owned by a corporate entity, one on which the persons on the yacht are employees, officers or shareholders (including beneficial owners) of the corporate entity, or their immediate family or friends; or

(b) in the case of other ownership arrangements one on which the persons on board the yacht are beneficiaries under the trust or beneficial owners of the ownership arrangement, or their immediate family or friends; or

(b) one on which persons other than those referenced in (a) or (b) above are specifically authorized by the owner to use the yacht for specified periods of time; and

(c) in private use;

“Private Use” means that the yacht is used on a private voyage or excursion, and during such use is not engaged in trade by transporting merchandise or carrying passengers for reward or remuneration (other than as a contribution to the actual cost of the yacht or its operation for the period of the voyage or excursion) or gain, and is not offered for commercial charter operations or for public use. See Annex 12 for specifics on the “Statement of Private Use”;

“Location 1” means upon exposed freeboard and raised quarter decks and upon exposed superstructure decks situated forward of a point located a quarter of the yacht’s length from the forward perpendicular;

“Location 2” means upon exposed superstructure decks situated abaft a quarter of the yacht’s length from the forward perpendicular;

“Power actuating system” is the hydraulic equipment provided for supplying power to turn the rudder stock, comprising a steering gear power unit or units, together with the associated pipes and fittings, and a rudder actuator. The power actuating systems may share common mechanical components, i.e., tiller, quadrant and rudder stock, or components serving the same purpose;

“Radar transponder” means a radio responding device designed for use in survival craft to facilitate location of survival craft in search and rescue operations;

“Recess” means an indentation or depression in a deck and which is surrounded by the deck and has no boundary common with the shell of the yacht, e.g. a hot tub or spa;

“Recognized Organization” means Classification Society, which the Administration has accepted as being compliant with the guidelines of IMO Resolution A.739(18) (see Section 28.0);

“Regulations” means the Marshall Islands Maritime Regulations (MI-108), as promulgated by the Maritime Administrator;

“Republic” means the Republic of the Marshall Islands;

“Rescue boat” means a boat complying with the requirements of Section 13.2.3 and designed to rescue persons in distress and for marshalling life rafts;

“Retro-reflective material” means a material that reflects in the opposite direction a beam of light directed on it and which complies with the specification laid down in Section 13.1.4;

“Safe haven” means a harbor or shelter of any kind that affords entry, subject to prudence in the weather conditions prevailing, and protection from the force of the weather;

“Sailing yacht” means a pleasure yacht designed to carry sail, whether as a sole means of propulsion or as a supplementary means;

“Sail training yacht” means a sailing yacht that at the time it is being used is being used either:

(a) to provide instruction in the principles of responsibility, resourcefulness, loyalty and team endeavor and to advance education in the art of seamanship; or

(b) to provide instruction in navigation and seamanship for yachtsmen;

“Side scuttle” means an ISO standardized type of an opening hinged or non-opening round ship’s window with or without deadlight (ISO 6345:1990);

“SOLAS” means the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, and the 1988 Protocol, as amended;

“SOLAS A emergency pack” means a life raft emergency pack complying with requirements of Table 3, paragraph 13.2.2.9 (see Section 13.2.2, Life rafts);

“SOLAS B emergency pack” means a life raft emergency pack complying with the requirements of Table 3, paragraph 13.2.2.9 (see Section 13.2.2, Life rafts);

“Standards” such as the BS, EN, CEN, IEC, ISO and USCG identified in the Code should include any standards that amend or replace them;

“Steering gear control system” is the equipment by which orders are transmitted from the navigating bridge to the steering gear power units. Steering gear control systems comprise transmitters, receivers, hydraulic control pumps and their associated motors, motor controllers, piping and cables;

“Steering gear power unit” is:

(a) in the case of electric steering gear, an electric motor and its associated electrical equipment;

(b) in the case of electrohydraulic steering gear, an electric motor and its associated electrical equipment and connected pump;

(c) in the case of other hydraulic steering gear, a driving engine and connected pump;

“Survival craft” means a craft capable of sustaining the lives of persons in distress from the time of abandoning the yacht; “Training Manual” with regard to life-saving appliances means a manual complying with the requirements of Section 22.7;

“Two-way VHF radiotelephone set” means a portable or a fixed VHF installation for survival craft complying with the performance adopted by the IMO;

“To sea” means beyond any partially smooth waters, or smooth waters limits that may have been designated by the Authority in which the yacht is operating. In the event that no such areas have been designated, then it means that the yacht is considered to have proceeded to sea upon leaving the immediate confined designated harbor;

“Void space” means any space having no practical function on board the yacht and incapable of readily collecting water under normal operating circumstances;

“Voyage” includes an excursion;

“Waterproofed” means protected as far as is practicable from the ingress of water;
“Watertight” means capable of preventing the passage of water in any direction;
“Weather deck” means the uppermost complete weathertight deck fitted as an integral part of the yacht’s structure and which is exposed to the sea and weather;

“Weathertight” has the meaning given in Annex I of ILLC viz. Weathertight means that in any sea conditions water will not penetrate into the yacht;

“Wheelhouse” means the control station occupied by the officer of the watch who is responsible for the safe navigation of the yacht;

“Window” means a ship’s window, being any window, regardless of shape, suitable for installation aboard yachts (ISO 6345:1990); and

“YARCC” (Yacht Appointed Representatives Consultative Committee.) means a group of individuals made up of members of the yachting industry, appointed representatives and officials of the Yacht Registry of the Marshall Islands Maritime Administration.

“Yachttec@register-iri.com” means the email address for the technical group supporting, and providing advice on interpretations or equivalencies within the Commercial Yacht Code.

3.0 APPLICATION and INTERPRETATION

3.1 Application

3.1.1 Effective date

The effective date of entry into force of this Code shall be the date of the revision as stated in the Issue and Revision History.

3.1.2 Large Commercial Yachts

.1 The Code applies to a motor or sailing yacht of 24 meters in load line length and over which, at the time it is registered, is in commercial use for sport or pleasure and carries no cargo and up to no more than 12 passengers, provided that it is not a vessel to which either the International Code of Safety for High-Speed Craft or the Code of Safety for Dynamically Supported Craft is applicable.

.2 To the Administration, any pleasure yacht engaged in trade, commerce, on charter or carrying passengers for consideration of whatsoever nature is a commercial yacht. Registration of commercial yachts is limited to those of 24 meters or more in load line length.

.3 The Marshall Islands is signatory to the major international shipping conventions, and, as vessels engaged in trade, commercial yachts are thus subject to the tonnage thresholds identified in SOLAS, Load Line, MARPOL and STCW Convention requirements. Furthermore, under SOLAS, any vessel carrying more than 12 passengers for hire on board is considered to be a passenger vessel, subject to the passenger ship rules, regardless of tonnage and irrespective of whether or not it is being presented as a commercial yacht and as such would not be considered for registration as a yacht, but as a passenger ship.

.4 Since SOLAS defines a cargo ship as any ship within the Convention that is not a passenger ship, a commercial yacht of 500 gross tons or more that carries 12 passengers or less for consideration must be Classed, as required by the Marshall Islands Maritime Regulations, by an organization recognized by the Maritime Administrator and certified as a cargo ship under the Convention utilizing this Commercial Yacht Code (MI-103) for equivalents that address the special circumstances of yacht design and operation.

.5 The Administration would prefer those commercial yachts of 24 meters or more in load line length but less than 500 gross tons be Classed by an organization recognized by the Maritime Administrator in order to facilitate satisfying the suitability requirements for registration. Although the Administration does not require that commercial yachts in this category be Classed, the technical reviews and surveys necessary to establish and maintain compliance with certain convention requirements will still more likely than not be performed by one (1) of the Administration’s recognized organizations that maintain rules for the construction of yachts. For this reason, and because classification standards are generally linked to statutory requirements, it is strongly recommended that these commercial yachts be retained in class.

.6 The Code has been adapted from prominent existing mega yacht codes with the express intention of setting minimum safety, security and pollution prevention standards that are consistent and appropriate to the size of the yacht and identify with the specific needs of yachts in commercial and private use for sport and pleasure. The standards applied are either set by the relevant international conventions or are equivalent standards where it is not reasonable, practicable or, in the case of non-convention vessels, a requirement to comply with the international conventions. The standards adopted are judged to be at least equivalent in their effect to those required by the international conventions for the maintenance of safety, security and pollution prevention.

.7 Compliance with the minimum standards required by the Code will entitle a yacht to be issued the certification applicable to the service and size of the yacht, upon satisfactory completion of the corresponding surveys and inspections. The certificates demanded by the international conventions that apply to commercial yachts covered by the Code are summarized in Section 29.0.

.8 Annex 1 lists the documents to which the Code refers for the application of specific safety, security and pollution prevention standards.

.9 Compliance with the Code satisfies the requirements of the Marshall Islands Maritime Regulations (MI-108), Section 2.11, as amended.

3.1.3 Large Private Yachts

The Code is also intended to serve as a guideline for private yachts 24 meters in load line length and over. It is recommended that private yachts as defined in the Marshall Islands Maritime Regulations (MI-108), Section 1.12, Definitions, shall conform to the standards of the Code as far as is practicable and reasonable to assure their safe operation.

Private yachts wishing to enjoy the 84 day chartering privilege allowed by the Administration shall comply with the lifesaving and firefighting equipment requirements of this Code. Please see Section 13.1, Table 2.

All private yachts of 80 gross tons or greater, or 24 meters or greater in length, and engaged in chartering, must apply for, and operate under, a Minimum Safe Manning Certificate,
MI-282-10 (see Annexes 4 and 12).

3.1.4 Hull types

The Code applies to monohull and multihull yachts.

3.1.5 Responsibility

It is the responsibility of the owner or managing agent to ensure that a yacht is properly maintained, inspected, surveyed and certified in accordance with the Code.

3.2 Operational Limitations

.1 Subject to the size, suitability for intended use and degree of compliance with the Code, a yacht may be considered for the issuance of a Certificate of Registry allowing it to operate under one (1) of the following limiting Categories:

Category 2 - up to 60 miles from a safe haven;

Category 1 - up to 150 miles from a safe haven; or

Category 0 - unrestricted service.

.2 Depending on the nature of the yacht and its intended use, it may be restricted to less than the above specified limits. All limitations or restrictions will be recorded on the Document of Compliance and the Certificate of Registry of the yacht, and Minimum Safe Manning Certificate.

.3 To be issued with a Certificate of Registry for a particular Category, a yacht should comply with all the requirements agreed to for that Category, to the satisfaction of an Appointed Representative of the Administration. In no case, however, should a yacht be allowed to exceed the operational limitations which may be set by the Appointed Representative.

3.3 Equivalent Standards, Exemptions and Existing Yachts

3.3.1 Equivalent standards

The Administration may consider a specific alternative equivalent standard to any standard required by the Code, provided that the proposed standard, code of practice, such as the MCA LY2, specification or technical description provides, in use, equivalent levels of safety, suitability and fitness for purpose. Annex 1 provides guidelines on the assessment of variations to the standards applied by the Code. Proposals for the application of alternative standards considered to be at least equivalent to the requirements of the Code should be submitted to an Appointed Representative for review, approval and forwarding with recommendations to the Administration for consideration. Equivalence may be achieved by incorporating increased requirements, such as declared areas of operation, to balance deficiencies and thereby achieve the overall safety standard desired.

3.3.2 Exemptions

.1 Exemptions are authorized and issued only by the Administration.

.2 Applications for exemption should be made to the Administration via its Appointed Representatives and be supported by justification for the exemption.

.3 The granting of exemptions will be limited by the extent to which international conventions allow and should be regarded as the exception and not the rule.

3.3.3 Existing yachts

.1 In the case of an existing yacht which does not comply fully with the Code safety standards but for which the Code standards are reasonable and practicable, the Administration may give consideration to a proposal from the owner(s) or managing agent(s) to phase in requirements within an agreed time frame.

.2 When an existing yacht does not meet the Code safety standard for a particular feature and it can be demonstrated that compliance is neither reasonable nor practicable, proposals for alternative arrangements should be submitted to an Appointed Representative for review, approval and forwarding with recommendation to the Administration for consideration. In considering individual cases, the Administration will take into account the yacht’s service history and any other factors that are judged to be relevant to the safety standard which can be achieved.

.3 Generally, repairs, alterations and refurbishments should comply with the standards applicable to a new yacht.

3.4 Interpretation and Appeal Process

3.4.1 Interpretation

Where a question of interpretation of any part of this Code arises which cannot be resolved by an Authorized Representative or a Recognized Organization and the owner(s)/managing agent(s) for a vessel, a decision on interpretation may be obtained on written application to the Administration.

3.4.2 Appeal Process

Where a question of application of any part of this Code arises which cannot be resolved by the Classification Society, Appointed Representative or other Appointed Representative and the owner or managing agent for a yacht, a decision may be obtained upon written request to the Office of the Maritime Administrator:

Marshall Islands Maritime and Corporate Administrators, Inc.
Technical Services
11495 Commerce Park Drive
Reston, Virginia 20191-1507 USA
Facsimile: +1-703-476-8522; Email: yachttec@register-iri.com

3.5 Review and Revision of the Code

The requirements of the Code will be reviewed and revised when necessary by the Maritime Administrator, and all interested parties will be advised. The latest revision will always be available on the Administration’s website, http://www.register-iri.com. Questions, comments and observations should be addressed to the Office of the Maritime Administrator at the address above.

3.6 Tonnage Measurement

.1 A tonnage measurement must be performed and a tonnage certificate issued and presented to the Office of the Maritime Administrator within 90 days of initial registration.

.2 Compliance with the International Convention on Tonnage Measurement of Ships, 1969, is required for yachts 24 meters in load line length or more. An Appointed Representative or Recognized Organization, as appropriate, should perform the admeasurement and certification.

.3 Yachts operating exclusively in the domestic waters of the Marshall Islands will not require an international tonnage certificate regardless of size.

3.7 Simplified Tonnage Measurement Method

A simplified method of measurement provided in Annex 2 may be used, if necessary, for private yachts that are not required to and do not have their tonnage calculated in accordance with the International Tonnage Convention, 1969. The simplified tonnage assignment criterion is applicable to vessels under 24 meters in Load Line length for monohull and multihull yachts of normal proportions and form. An Appointed Representative should perform the admeasurement and certification.

4.0 CONSTRUCTION and STRENGTH

4.1 General Requirements

.1 All commercial yachts of 500 gross tons or more must be Classed by one (1) of the organizations recognized by the Maritime Administrator listed in Section 28.1.

.2 All yachts should have a freeboard deck.

.3 All yachts should be fitted with a weathertight weather deck for the length of the yacht and be of adequate strength to withstand the sea and weather conditions likely to be encountered in the declared area(s) of operation.

.4 The declared area(s) of operation and any other conditions, which restrict the use of the yacht at sea, must be recorded on the Document of Compliance and the Certificate of Registry and Minimum Safe Manning Certificate issued to the yacht.

.5 The choice of hull construction material affects fire protection requirements, for which reference should be made to Section 14.0.

4.2 Structural Strength

4.2.1 New yachts

.1 New yachts will be considered to be of adequate strength if built under survey and are certificated to be in accordance with applicable yacht construction rules set by any of the Administration’s Recognized Classification Societies.

A Confirmation of Classification Certificate should be provided.

.2 New yachts Classed by one (1) of the Classification Societies listed in Section 28.1 after construction has been completed in accordance with the standards of the Society, will be accepted as being of adequate strength for the service conditions covered by the classification notation.

A Confirmation of Classification Certificate should be provided.

.3 New yachts not built in accordance with paragraph 4.2.1.1 may be specially considered provided full information, including calculations, drawings and details of materials prepared by the yacht designer is provided to an Appointed Representative for review and satisfactory survey before acceptance by the Administration.

(a) The submission of calculations for scantlings is particularly important for high-speed craft.

(b) A Statement of Compliance should be provided.

(c) See Section 28.0 regarding Recognized Organizations and survey during construction.

4.2.2 Existing yachts

Existing yachts will be considered to be of adequate structural strength if they are in good repair and were:

.1 Built to the standards defined by paragraph 4.2.1.1 for new yachts and remain in class; or

.2 Built to the standards defined by paragraph 4.2.1.1 for new yachts and, where no longer in class, are subjected to a full structural survey by an Appointed Representative to determine that the hull is substantially in as-built condition and records indicate satisfactory engine and electrical maintenance. A Statement of Compliance should be provided; or

.3 Not built in accordance with paragraph 4.2.2.1 but where full information, including calculations, drawings and details of materials have been provided and reviewed by an Appointed Representative of the Administration, and the yacht subjected to a satisfactory survey by the Appointed Representative. A Statement of Compliance should be provided.

4.3 Recesses

Any recess in the weather deck should be of weathertight construction and should be self-draining under all normal conditions of heel and trim of the yacht.

4.4 Watertight Bulkheads

4.4.1 New yachts

.1 The strength of watertight bulkheads should be in accordance with the requirements of one of the Classification Societies listed in Section 28.1.

.2 Generally, openings in required watertight bulkheads should have an efficient means of closure that will maintain the watertight integrity of the bulkhead, similar to the standards required of passenger vessels as defined in SOLAS Chapter II-1, Regulation 15 (Openings in watertight bulkheads in passenger ships).

.3 Watertight doors should normally be closed, unless frequent access to living and working spaces through sliding watertight doors is necessary. When access to a compartment is unlikely for lengthy periods, the sliding doors or approved hinged doors should be closed.

.4 Hinged watertight doors in lieu of those required by SOLAS Chapter II-1, Regulation 15, are considered acceptable for yachts less than 50 meters in load line length or under 500 gross tons. Such doors should be fitted with indicators in the wheelhouse and remain shut at sea, except at the Master’s discretion, or in accordance with operational procedures. This is based on the subdivision being an alternative to load line conditions of assignment and not a SOLAS subdivision standard, which applies to vessels over 80 meters in load line length.

.5 Procedures for the operation of watertight doors should be established and posted in suitable locations.

4.4.2 Existing yachts

.1 Watertight bulkheads in existing yachts should comply with the requirements of Section 4.4.1 as far as it is reasonable and practicable to do so.

.2 In individual cases when an Appointed Representative considers that the requirements of Section 4.4.1 cannot be met, the Administration may consider a justification for exemption from the specified requirements.

.3 In considering an individual case, the Administration will take into account the yacht’s past performance in service and the declared area(s) of operation and any other conditions that restrict the use of the yacht at sea, which will be recorded on the Document of Compliance and Certificate of Registry, and Minimum Safe Manning Certificate issued to the yacht (see Section 4.1).

4.5 Enclosed Compartments within the Hull and below the Freeboard Deck provided with Access through Openings in the Hull

.1 Compartment(s) below the freeboard deck, provided for recreational purposes, oil fuelling/fresh water reception or other purposes to do with the business of the vessel and having access openings in the hull, should be bounded by watertight divisions without any opening (i.e. doors, manholes, ventilation ducts or any other opening) separating the compartment(s) from any other compartment below the freeboard deck, unless provided with sliding watertight doors.

.2 For vessel’s less than 500 GRT, approved hinged watertight door may be accepted, provided the following conditions are met:

(a) The lower edge of the shell opening shall not be below a line drawn parallel to the freeboard deck at side, which is at its lowest point at least 230 mm above the upper edge of the uppermost load line.

(b) A leakage detection device shall be provided in the compartment between the two doors. With visual and audible warnings on the bridge.

(c) The sill of the inner door is above the sill of the shell opening.

or

(d) After flooding of the space containing the shell opening, the resultant waterline is below the sill of the internal openings in that space.

.3 Openings in the hull should comply with SOLAS Regulation II-1/25-10 – External openings in cargo ships. Provision should be made to ensure that doors may be manually closed and locked in the event of power or hydraulic failure.

4.6 Sailing Yacht Rigging

4.6.1 General Maintenance

.1 The condition of the rig should be monitored in accordance with a planned maintenance schedule. The schedule should include, in particular, regular monitoring of all the gear associated with safe work aloft and on the bowsprit (see Section 22.3, Safe Work Aloft and on the Bowsprit of Sailing Yachts).

.2 The overall sail area and spar weights and dimensions should be as documented in the yacht’s stability information book. Modifications that increase sail area and/or weights and dimensions must be reflected in an approved updating of the stability information booklet.

4.6.2 Masts and spars

.1 Dimensions and construction materials of masts and spars should be in accordance with the recommendations of one of the Classification Societies listed in Section 28.1 or a recognized international standard.

.2 The associated structure for masts and spars (including fittings, decks and floors) should be constructed to absorb the forces involved.

4.6.3 Running and standing rigging

.1 Wire rope used for standing rigging (stays or shrouds) should not be flexible wire rope (fiber rope core).

.2 The strength of all blocks, shackles, rigging screws, cleats and associated fittings and attachment points should exceed the breaking strength of the associated running or standing rigging.

.3 Chainplates for standing rigging should be constructed to support and absorb the forces involved. Only one (1) shroud or stay should load an individual attachment point, unless the design specifically allows for more.

4.6.4 Sails

.1 Adequate means of reefing or shortening sail should be provided.

.2 Category 0 and Category 1 yachts should either be provided with separate storm sails or have specific sails designated and constructed to act as storm canvas.

5.0 WEATHERTIGHT INTEGRITY

For new yachts and existing yachts, the standards for achieving weathertight integrity should comply with or be equivalent to the ILLC as far as it is reasonable and practicable.

In individual cases, when an Appointed Representative considers that the requirements of ILLC or the Code cannot be met, the Appointed Representative may consider and propose to the Administration alternative arrangements to achieve adequate safety standards, such as, operational limitations.

For an existing yacht, the yacht’s past performance in service and the declared area(s) of operation and any other conditions will be taken into account. Conditions that restrict the use of the yacht at sea should be recorded on the Document of Compliance and the Certificate of Registry and Minimum Safe Manning Certificate issued to the yacht. (See Section 4.1)

The minimum acceptable standards for the weathertight integrity of hatches, skylights and doors that should be applied are as follows:

5.1 Hatchways and Skylight Hatches
5.1.1 General requirements
.1 All openings leading to spaces below the weather deck not capable of being closed weathertight, must be enclosed within either an enclosed superstructure or a weathertight deckhouse of adequate strength.

.2 All exposed hatchways which give access to spaces below the weathertight weather deck are to be of substantial weathertight construction and provided with efficient means of closure. Weathertight hatch covers should be permanently attached to the yacht and provided with adequate arrangements for securing the hatch closed.

.3 Hatches that are to be used for escape purposes should be provided with covers that are capable of being opened from both sides. An escape hatch should be readily identified and easy and safe to use, having due regard to its position and access to and from the hatch.

.4 Flush deck hatches are acceptable for escape hatches and lockers on deck if constructed to Class requirements. Wells for rescue boats with flush hatches are acceptable provided they meet the requirements for wells.

5.1.2 Hatchways that are open at sea

In general, hatches should be kept closed at sea. However, hatchways that may be kept open for access at sea for lengthy periods are to be kept as small as practicable (a maximum of one (1) square meter in clear area), located on the centerline of the yacht, and fitted with coamings of at least 300mm in height in Location 1 and 150mm in height in Location 2 (refer to Section 2.0, Definitions). Covers of hatchways are to be permanently attached to the hatch coamings and, where hinged, the hinges are to be located on the forward side.

5.2 Doorways and Companionways

5.2.1 Doorways located above the weather deck

5.2.1.1 Exposed doors in deckhouses and superstructures that give access to spaces below the weather deck are to be weathertight, and door openings should have coaming heights of not less than:

.1 600mm when the door is in the forward quarter length of the yacht and used when the yacht is at sea;

.2 300mm when the door is in an exposed forward facing location aft of the forward quarter length; or

.3 150mm above the surface of the deck when the door is in a protected location aft of the forward quarter length.

Assuming these minimums are maintained, the Administration will consider an exemption for the purposes of issuing an International Load Line Certificate, when required.

Location Unrestricted Yachts Category 1 & 2
1 600mm 300mm
2 300mm 150mm
3 150mm 75mm

5.2.1.2 Weathertight doors should be arranged to open outwards and when located in a house side, be hinged at the forward edge. Alternative closing arrangements will be considered providing it can be demonstrated that the efficiency of the closing arrangements and their ability to prevent the ingress of water will not impair the safety of the yacht.

5.2.1.3 An access door leading directly to the engine room from the weather deck should be fitted with a coaming height of 600mm if in Position 1 and 380mm if in Position 2 (see Definitions, Section 2.0).

Location Unrestricted Yachts Category 1 & 2
1 600mm 450mm
2 380mm 200mm

5.2.1.4 Coaming height, construction and securing standards for weathertight doors that are provided for use only when the yacht is in port or at anchor in calm sheltered waters and are locked closed when the yacht is at sea, may be considered individually.

5.2.2 Companion hatch openings

.1 Companionway hatch openings that give access to spaces below the weather deck should be fitted with a coaming the top of which is at least 300mm above the deck.

.2 Washboards may be used to close the vertical opening. When washboards are used, they should be so arranged and fitted that they will not be dislodged readily. Provisions are to be made to ensure that they are stowed in a secure location when not in use.

.3 The maximum breadth of an opening in a companion hatch should not exceed one (1) meter.

5.3 Skylights

.1 All skylights should be of efficient weathertight construction complying with a recognized standard, provided with a portable cover and should be located on or as near to the centerline of the yacht as practicable.

.2 If they are of the opening type, they should be provided with efficient means whereby they can be secured in the closed position.

.3 Skylights that are provided as a means of escape should be operable from both sides. An escape skylight should be readily identified and easy and safe to use, having due regard to its position and access to and from the skylight.

.4 The skylight glazing material and its method of securing within the frame should meet the appropriate marine standards defined in equivalent BS, EN, national or international standards.

A minimum of one (1) portable cover for each size of glazed opening should be provided which can be accessed rapidly and efficiently secured in the event of a breakage of the skylight.

5.4 Side Scuttles

.1 Side scuttles should be of an approved type. Oval portholes can be accepted on the basis of equivalent area (0.16 m2) and similar scantlings to round portholes. They should be of strength appropriate to location in the yacht and meet appropriate recognized international marine standards. With regard to structural fire protection in new yachts, the requirements for the construction of certain side scuttles should meet the requirements of Section 14.3.3.10.

.2 In general, all side scuttles fitted in locations protecting openings to spaces below the weather deck or fitted in the hull of the yacht should be provided with a deadlight which is to be permanently attached and is capable of securing the opening watertight in the event of a breakage of the scuttle glazing. Proposals to fit side scuttles with portable deadlights will be subject to special consideration and approval by an Appointed Representative, having regard for the location of the side scuttles and ready availability of deadlights to be fitted. Consideration should be given to the provision of operational instructions to the Master as to when deadlights must be applied to side scuttles.

.3 Side scuttles fitted in the hull of the yacht below the level of the freeboard deck should be either non-opening or of a non readily opening type, have a glazed diameter of not more than 450mm and be in accordance with a standard recognized by an Appointed Representative. The sill height of the side scuttles should be at least 500mm or 2.5% of the breadth of the yacht, whichever is the greater, above the all seasons load line assigned to the yacht. Scuttles of the non-readily opening type must be secured closed when the yacht is in navigation.

.4 Side scuttles should not be fitted in the hull in way of the machinery space.

5.5 Windows

.1 Windows should be of an approved type. They should be of strength appropriate to location in the yacht and meet appropriate marine standards defined in equivalent BS, EN, national or international standards. Where windows are not to Code (ISO 6345:1990) requirements, they may be accepted subject to review and approval by an Appointed Representative. With regard to structural fire protection in new yachts, the requirements for the construction of certain windows should meet the requirements of Section 14.3.3.10.

.2 In general, windows fitted in superstructures or weathertight deckhouses are to be substantially framed and efficiently secured to the structure. The glass is to be of the toughened safety glass type that breaks into small sized particles. The glass may be laminated or monolithic, but lamination alone is not acceptable if the glass breaks into dangerous fragments that are assumed to detach from the plastic layers. Polycarbonate windows are accepted provided they meet the standards for unrestricted sea-going commercial service. Small bonded windows may be accepted on a case-by-case basis.

Safety standards relating to the provision of large glass doors or windows fitted in the aft end of a superstructure or weathertight deckhouse will be considered on an individual basis by an Appointed Representative.

.3 In general, windows should not be fitted in the main hull below the level of the freeboard deck. Proposals to fit windows in the main hull below the level of the freeboard deck will be subject to special consideration and approval by an Appointed Representative, having regard for the location and strength of the windows and their supporting structure and, the availability of strong protective covers for the windows. One item of special consideration should be operational instructions to the Master as to when the strong protective covers must be applied to windows.

.4 For Category 0 yachts, unrestricted service, storm shutters are required for all windows in the front and sides of first tier and front windows of the second tier of superstructures or weathertight deckhouses above the freeboard deck. Where windows are of sandwich construction and their equivalent toughened safety glass thickness exceeds the requirements by not less than 30%, they are acceptable without storm shutters, but a blanking plate is to be provided for each size window. When storm shutters are interchangeable port and starboard, a minimum of 50% of each size should be provided.

.5 Windows to the navigating position should not be of either polarized or tinted glass. (See paragraph 18.2.2.)

5.6 Ventilators and Exhausts

.1 Adequate natural and/or mechanical ventilation is to be provided throughout the yacht. The accommodation spaces are to be protected from the entry of gas and/or vapor fumes from galley, machinery, exhaust and fuel systems.

.2 Ventilators in exposed locations are to be of efficient construction and provided with permanently attached means of weathertight closure. Generally, ventilators serving any space below the freeboard deck or an enclosed superstructure should have coamings of minimum heights as specified in the table below.

Location Unrestricted Yachts Category 1 & 2
Forward Quarter Length 900mm 450mm
Elsewhere 760mm 380mm

.3 Ventilators should be kept as far inboard as practicable and the height above the deck of the ventilator opening should be sufficient to prevent the ingress of water when the yacht heels.

.4 The ventilation of spaces, such as the machinery space, that must remain open requires special attention with regard to the location and height of the ventilation openings above the deck taking into account the effect of downflooding angle on stability standard.

.5 The means of closure of ventilators serving the machinery space should be selected with regard to the fire protection and extinguishing arrangements provided in the machinery space.

.6 Engine exhaust outlets that penetrate the hull below the freeboard deck should be provided with means to prevent backflooding into the hull through a damaged exhaust system. At a minimum, vessels should have well constructed anti-siphon loops on all exhaust lines at a minimum height of one (1) meter above the waterline or a satisfactory waterbreak system.

5.7 Air Pipes

.1 Air pipes serving fuel and other tanks should be of efficient construction and provided with permanently attached means of weathertight closure. Means of closure may be omitted if it can be shown that the open end of an air pipe is protected by other structures that will prevent the ingress of water.

.2 Where located on the weather deck, air pipes should be kept as far inboard as practicable and be fitted with a coaming of sufficient height to prevent inadvertent flooding. Generally, air pipes to tanks should have coamings of minimum heights as specified in the table below.

Location Unrestricted Yachts Category 1 & 2
On Weather Deck 760mm 380mm
Elsewhere 450mm 225mm

.3 Air pipes to fuel tanks should terminate at a height of not less than 760mm above either the top of the filler pipe for a gravity filling tank or the top of the overflow tank for a pressure filling tank.

5.8 Scuppers, Sea Inlets and Discharges

The standards of the ILLC should be applied to every discharge led through the shell of the yacht as far as it is reasonable and practicable to do so, and in any case, all sea inlet and overboard discharges should be provided with efficient shut-off valves arranged in positions where they are readily accessible at all times.

5.9 Materials for Valves and Associated Piping

.1 Valves that are fitted below the waterline should be of steel, bronze or other material having a similar resistance to impact and fire.

.2 The associated piping should, in areas as indicated above, be of steel, bronze, copper or other equivalent material that is considered of equal or greater strength than the hull.

.3 Where the use of plastic piping is proposed, it will be considered on an individual basis and full details of the type of piping, its intended location and use, should be submitted to an Appointed Representative for review and submission with recommendation to the Administration for consideration of approval. The Administration may require tests to be carried out on the plastic piping, as necessary, to give approval to its use.

.4 The use of flexible piping in any situation should be kept to a minimum compatible with the essential reason for its use. An Appointed Representative should approve flexible piping and the means of joining it to its associated hard piping system as fit for the purpose.

5.10 General Equivalence.

Where vessels cannot comply with the requirements of this section, equivalent arrangements may be considered by the Administration. Such proposals should take into account the following non -exhaustive list:

(a) Closure at sea;
(b) Enhanced bilge pumping capacity and bilge alarms;
(c) Full compliance with damage stability;
(d) Provision of dorade boxes or baffle systems to prevent direct water ingress;
(e) Alternative ventilation for use in bad weather;
(f) Excess freeboard – greater than one standard superstructure height;
(g) Consideration of risk of downflooding angle and height due to position;
(h) Consideration of risk of green sea loads;
(i) Enhanced survey inspection regime;
(j) Operational limitations.

6.0 WATER FREEING ARRANGEMENTS

.1 For new yachts and existing yachts, the standards for water freeing arrangements should comply with the ILLC as far as it is reasonable and practicable to do so. In any case, the intention should be to achieve a standard of safety that is at least equivalent to the standard of the ILLC.

.2 In individual cases, when an Appointed Representative considers that the requirements of the ILLC cannot be met, the Appointed Representative may propose alternative arrangements to achieve adequate safety standards for the Administration’s consideration.

.3 In considering an individual case, the Appointed Representative may take into account the yacht’s past performance in service and the declared area(s) of operation and any other conditions that restrict the use of the yacht at sea that will be recorded on the Document of Compliance and Certificate of Registry and Minimum Safe Manning Certificate issued to the yacht. (See Section 4.1.)

.4 Section 4.3 sets requirements specific to the drainage of recesses.

7.0 MACHINERY

7.1 Yachts of less than 500 GT.

7.1.1 General Requirements

.1 The machinery and its installation should, in general, meet with the requirements of one of the Classification Societies named in Section 28.1 and if Classed, a Certificate of Class issued and forwarded to the Administration on completion of survey.

Where the yacht is Unclassed, the Appointed Representative will confirm compliance as part of the Document of Compliance.

For existing and new yachts that operate with periodically unattended machinery spaces, the machinery and its installation should meet the standards of SOLAS Chapter II-1/
Part E – Additional Requirements for Periodically Unattended Machinery Spaces, so far as it is reasonable and practicable to do so.

Plastic piping may be accepted where the piping and the arrangements for its use meet the requirements of the IMO Fire Test Procedures Code.

.2 For Unclassed vessels, the machinery should be built to equivalent requirements such as to a survey procedure adopted by a Class Society which is based upon an approved quality assurance scheme to ISO 9000 (or equivalent), or type approval.

.3 On all sailing yachts, the survey of the shafting and propulsion machinery should be included in the survey. On Classed vessels this should also be included in the class notation.

.4 With regard to UMS requirements for new yachts of less than 500 gross tons and existing yachts of 500 gross tons and over, in practice, most such yachts will operate with UMS, and appropriate Class standards should be used for alarms, remote shut downs, etc., as far as reasonable and practicable. Alarms should be repeated in the wheelhouse and engineers/crews area. Class may have some minimum standards for lube oil pressure and cooling water temperature. It is also appropriate to allow that on some yachts the distance from the wheelhouse to engines is similar to that from the machinery control room to the engines on a large yacht.

.5 Periodical survey requirements of machinery and electrical arrangements should be similar to those of Class. Where not Classed, the machinery survey shall include engine maintenance report and steering gear service report. Shafts need not be drawn if readings of aft bearings are within manufacturer’s accepted tolerances.

.6 The requirements for main propulsion are based upon the installation of diesel powered units, burning distillate fuels which do not require to be heated. When other types of main propulsion systems are proposed, the arrangements and installation should be specially considered.

.7 Notwithstanding the requirements of paragraph 7.1.1.1, in a fuel supply system to an engine unit, when a flexible section of piping is introduced, connections should be of a screw type or equivalent approved type. Flexible pipes should be fire resistant/metal reinforced or otherwise protected from fire. Materials and fittings should be of a suitable recognized national or international standard that provides for a fire rating of at least 800 deg/30 minutes. Glass or plastic filter bowls are not acceptable and should be replaced with steel bowls, even on existing yachts. In the case of an existing yacht fitted with a diesel engine in which the installation of a flexible section of piping does not immediately meet the requirements, the requirements should be met when existing fittings in the fuel supply system are replaced.

7.1.2 Installation

.1 Notwithstanding the requirements referred to in Section 7.1.1, the machinery, fuel tanks and associated piping systems and fittings should be of a design and construction adequate for the service for which they are intended, and should be so installed and protected as to reduce to a minimum any danger to persons during normal movement about the yacht, due regard being made to moving parts, hot surfaces, and other hazards.

.2 Means should be provided to isolate any source of fuel that may feed a fire in an engine space. A fuel shut-off valve(s) should be provided which is capable of being closed from a position outside the engine space. The valve(s) should be fitted as close as possible to the fuel tank(s).

.3 When a glass fuel level gauge is fitted, it should be of the “flat glass” type with self-closing valves between the gauge and the tank.

7.2 Yachts of 500 GT and over

.1 For existing and new yachts, the machinery and its installation shall meet the requirements of one of the Classification Societies named in Section 28.1 and the standards of SOLAS Chapter II-1/Part C – Machinery installations and II-1/part E – Additional requirements for periodically unattended machinery spaces (when appropriate).

.2 For sailing yachts with mechanical propulsion, this should be included in the survey and reflected in the Class notation.

.3 In any case, the intention should be to achieve a standard of safety, which is at least equivalent to the standard of SOLAS. Equivalence may be achieved by incorporating increased requirements to balance deficiencies and thereby achieve the required overall standard.

.4 Where gas turbines are to be fitted, attention should be paid to the guidance contained within the IMO High Speed Craft Code with installation to be to the satisfaction of the Administration or its Appointed Representative.

8.0 ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS

8.1 Yachts of less than 500 GT

8.1.1 General Requirements

.1 The electrical equipment and its installation should, in general, meet with the requirements of one of the Classification Societies named in Section 28.1, and if Classed, a Certificate of Class issued and forwarded to the Administration on completion of survey. For Unclassed vessels the Appointed Representative will confirm compliance as part of the Document of Compliance.

Where the yacht is Unclassed, the survey should ensure that the electrical systems are to accepted marine standards, with an insulation resistance test carried out to the extent determined by the Appointed Representative

.2 For sailing yachts, the electrical arrangements should also be surveyed to a degree necessary to ensure safety of the yacht including the control of the sails.

8.1.2 Installation

.1 Particular attention should be paid to the provision of overload and short circuit protection of all circuits, except engine starting circuits supplied from batteries.

.2 Electrical devices working in potentially hazardous areas into which petroleum vapor or other hydrocarbon gas may leak, should be provided with protection against the risk of igniting the gas.

8.1.3 Emergency Lighting

.1 Lighting circuits, including those of emergency lighting, should be distributed through the spaces so that a total blackout cannot occur due to failure of a single protective device. This paragraph has general application and is not confined to emergency circuits.

.2 An emergency source of lighting should be provided which should be independent of the general lighting system and sufficient to enable persons to make their way up to the open deck from the accommodations or working spaces and evacuate the yacht if necessary. This lighting, supplemented by torches, should also be sufficient to permit emergency repairs to machinery, etc.

.3 Emergency power should be sufficient to provide power for three (3) hours duration at maximum output.

8.1.4 Batteries

Batteries of a type suitable for marine use and not liable to leakage should be used.

8.1.5 Battery Storage

Areas where unsealed batteries are stored should be provided with adequate ventilation to prevent an accumulation of gas that is emitted from batteries of all types.

8.1.6 Flammable Gases

The installation of gas requires a detection system with a suitable certified safe unit as per Section 14.1.1. It is normal that such arrangements provide a shutdown of the gas supply upon detection.

8.2 Yachts of 500 GT and over

8.2.1 General Requirements

.1 The electrical equipment and its installation shall meet with the requirements of one of the Classification Societies named in Section 28.1, and a Certificate of Class issued and forwarded to the Administration on completion of survey. For existing and new yachts, the electrical equipment and its installation shall meet the standards of SOLAS Chapter II-1/Part D – Electrical installations and II-1/Part E – Additional requirements for periodically unattended machinery spaces (when appropriate), so far as it is reasonable and practicable to do so.

.2 For sailing yachts, the electrical arrangements should be surveyed to a degree necessary to ensure safety of the yacht including the control of the sails.

.3 In any case, the intention should be to achieve a standard of safety that is at least equivalent to the standard of SOLAS. Equivalence may be achieved by incorporating increased requirements to balance deficiencies and thereby achieve the required overall standard.

8.2.2 Emergency Power Source

Emergency power sources independent of the main power supply should, where possible, be located external to the engine room. It should have its own distribution system independent of the main generators and main switchboard by a division capable of ensuring its continued operation.

Emergency power sources may be below the uppermost continuous deck provided that the arrangements permit equivalent safety from fire and flooding and ready access from the open deck.

The emergency power source should be sufficient for up to 18 hours duration.

8.2.3 Flammable Gases

Refer to Section 14.1.1.

9.0 STEERING GEAR

9.1 Yachts of less than 500 GT

9.1.1 General Requirements

The machinery and its installation should, in general, meet with the requirements of one of the Classification Societies named in Section 28.1, and if Classed, a Certificate of Class issued and forwarded to the Administration on completion of survey. Where the yacht is Unclassed, a. Document of Compliance issued by an Appointed Representative should be provided to the Administration.

In the event that the above requirements cannot be met on an existing yacht, the Administration may be requested to consider and approve alternative arrangements to achieve adequate safety standards.

9.1.2 Rudder Steering Systems

For rudder steering systems, the steering gear should be capable of turning the rudder from 35 on one side to 35 on the other side at the maximum ahead service speed of the yacht. When appropriate to the safe steering of the yacht, the steering gear should be power operated.

9.1.3 Emergency Steering

When the steering gear is fitted with remote control, arrangements should be made for emergency steering in the event of a failure of such control.

9.2 Yachts of 500 GT and over

9.2.1 General Requirements

.1 The machinery and its installation should meet with the requirements of one of the Classification Societies named in Section 28.1, and a Certificate of Class issued and forwarded to the Administration on completion of survey. For existing and new yachts, the steering gear and its installation shall meet the standards of SOLAS Chapter II-1/Part C – Machinery installations, so far as it is reasonable and practicable to do so.

.2 In any case, the intention should be to achieve a standard of safety that is at least equivalent to the standard of SOLAS. Equivalence may be achieved considering the yacht handling capabilities using twin screw propulsion or by incorporating increased requirements to balance deficiencies and thereby achieve the required overall standard.

9.2.2 Emergency Steering

An arrangement for emergency steering in the event of the failure of the primary system should be fitted.

10.0 BILGE PUMPING

10.1 Yachts of less than 500 GT

10.1.1 General Requirements

.1 The bilge pumping equipment and its installation should, in general, meet with the requirements of one of the Classification Societies named in Section 28.1, and a Certificate of Class issued and forwarded to the Administration on completion of survey. If the yacht is Unclassed, a statement of compliance issued by an Appointed Representative should be provided to the Administration.

.2 In the event that the above requirements cannot be met on an existing yacht, the Administration, through its Appointed Representative, may be requested to consider alternative arrangements to achieve adequate safety standards.

10.1.2 Pumps

.1 All yachts should be provided with at least two (2) fixed and independently powered pumps, with suction pipes so arranged that any compartment can be effectively drained when the yacht is heeled to an angle of 10.

.2 The location of pumps, their individual power supplies and controls, including those for bilge valves, should be such that in the event of any one compartment being flooded another pump is available to control progressive flooding to other compartments.

.3 Each bilge pump suction line other than the emergency suction line, should be fitted with an efficient strum box.

.4 Portable semi-submersible bilge pumps, preferably diesel driven, may be considered as an alternative to one of the two required pumps on existing yachts.

10.1.3 Unmanned Machinery Spaces

In the case of a yacht where the propulsion machinery space may be unmanned at any time, a bilge level alarm should be fitted. The alarm should provide an audible and visual warning in the crew mess and in the wheelhouse. The audible and visual alarm may be accepted elsewhere if it is considered that such a location may be more appropriate.

10.1.4 Pumping and Piping Arrangements

.1 Pumping and piping arrangements for bilges into which fuel or other oils of similar or higher fire risk could collect, under either normal or fault conditions, should be kept clear of accommodation spaces and separate from accommodation bilge systems. Bilge level alarms meeting the requirements of Section 10.1.3 should be fitted to all such bilges in spaces that are unmanned at any time.

.2 Approved plastic bilge piping may be accepted outside the engine room. The materials used for bilge piping in the engine room must have fire resistant qualities to the satisfaction of the Appointed Representative.

.3 It should be part of Class survey, notwithstanding Class Rules, to ensure that satisfactory emergency bilge pumping as per this Code standard (independent of the main bilge pumps) is provided. The requirements of this Code must be met as well as Class requirements.

10.2 Yachts of 500 GT and over

.1 The machinery and its installation should meet with the requirements of one of the Classification Societies named in Section 28.1, and a Certificate of Class issued and forwarded to the Administration on completion of survey. For existing and new yachts, the bilge pumping and its installation should meet the passenger vessel standards of SOLAS Chapter II-1/Part B – Subdivision and stability, so far as it is reasonable and practicable to do so.

.2 In any case, the intention should be to achieve a standard of safety that is at least equivalent to the standard of SOLAS. Equivalence may be achieved by incorporating increased requirements to balance deficiencies and thereby achieve the required overall standard.

.3 A minimum of two (2) fixed pumps should be provided. The capacity of the pumps and the size of the bilge main branches should meet the requirements for passenger ships contained in SOLAS. In addition, the requirements for yachts of less than 500 gross tons contained in Section 10.1 above should be met.

11.0 STABILITY – Intact and Damaged

11.1 General

.1 This Section addresses the standards that should be met for both intact and damaged stability.

.2 An intact stability standard proposed for assessment of a yacht type, which is not covered by the standards defined in the Code, should be submitted to an Appointed Representative for review and forwarding with recommendation to the Administration for consideration of approval at the earliest opportunity.

.3 If used, permanent ballast should be located in accordance with a plan approved by an Appointed Representative and in a manner that prevents shifting of position. Permanent ballast should not be added or removed from the yacht without the approval of the Appointed Representative. Permanent ballast particulars should be noted in the yacht’s stability information booklet. The Appointed Representative should consider the strength considerations.

.4 The buoyancy of superstructures, deckhouses, etc which may be taken into account shall be in accordance with Section 3.6.2 of the IMO Resolution A.749(18) for intact and damage stability.

11.2 Intact Stability

11.2.1 New motor yachts

.1 Vessels operating as category 0, 1, or 2 (See Section 3.2)

In accordance with IMO Resolution A.749(18), the curves of static stability for seagoing conditions should meet the following criteria:

(a) The area under the righting lever curve (GZ curve) should not be less than 0.055 meter-radians up to a 30 angle of heel and not less than 0.09 meter-radians up to a 40 angle of heel, or the angle of down flooding, if this angle is less than 40 degrees.

(b) The area under the GZ curve between the angles of heel of 30 and 40 or between 30 and the angle of down flooding if this is less than 40, should not be less than 0.03 meter-radians;

(c) The righting lever (GZ) should be at least 0.20 meters at an angle of heel equal to or greater than 30;

(d) The maximum GZ should occur at an angle of heel preferably exceeding 30 but not less than 25;

(e) After correction for free surface effects, the initial metacentric height (GM) should not be less than 0.15 meters; and

.2 For vessels operating as category 0, 1, or 2 (See Section 3.2) where compliance with 11.2.1.1 cannot be achieved, the curves of statical stability for seagoing conditions should meet the following criteria:

(a) The area under the righting lever curve (GZ curve) should not be less than 0.075 meter-radians up to an angle of 20 when the maximum righting lever (GZ) occurs at 20, and not less than 0.055 meter-radians up to an angle of 30 when the maximum righting lever (GZ) occurs at 30 or above. When the maximum righting lever (GZ) occurs at angles between 20 and 30, the corresponding requisite area under the righting lever curve (GZ curve) should be determined by linear interpolation by the formula:

Area to maximum righting lever, at  = 0.055 + 0.002(30 – max) meter radians;

Where Ө max is the angle of heel in degrees where the GZ curve reaches its maximum

(b) The area under the GZ curve between the angles of heel of 30 and 40 or between 30 and the angle of downflooding if this is less than 40, should not be less than 0.03 meter-radians;

(c) The righting lever (GZ) should be at least 0.20 meters at an angle of heel where it reaches its maximum;

(d) The maximum GZ should occur at an angle of heel not less than 20;

(e) After correction for free surface effects, the initial metacentric height (GM) should not be less than 0.15 meters; and

(f) If the maximum righting lever (GZ) occurs at an angle of less than 20, approval of the stability should be considered by the Administration as a special case.

.3 For vessels operating as category 1 or 2 (See Section 3.2) where compliance with 11.2.1.1 or 11.2.1.2 cannot be achieved, the curves of statical stability for seagoing conditions should meet the following criteria:

(a) the area under the righting lever curve (GZ curve) should not be less than 0.07 metre-radians up to 15o angle of heel, when maximum GZ occurs at 15°, and 0.055 metre-radians up to 30o angle of heel, when maximum GZ occurs at 30° or above. Where the maximum GZ occurs at angles of between 15° and 30°, the corresponding area under the GZ curve, Areq should be taken as follows:-

Areq = 0.055 +0.001(30° – max) metre-radians

Where max is the angle of heel in degrees where the GZ curve reaches its maximum.

(b) the area under the GZ curve between the angles of heel of 30o and 40o or between 30o and the angle of downflooding if this is less than 40o, should not be less than 0.03 metre-radians;

(d) the righting lever (GZ) should be at least 0.20 metres at an angle of heel equal to or greater than 30o;

(e) the maximum GZ should occur at an angle of heel not less than 15°;

(f) after correction for free surface effects, the initial metacentric height (GM) should not be less than 0.15 metres.

11.2.2 Existing motor yachts

.1 The standard of stability required to be achieved by an existing yacht is generally to be as required for a new yacht.

.2 Unless a yacht is provided with stability information that is approved to a standard recognized by the Administration and relevant to the yacht in its present condition, the yacht should be treated as if it is a new yacht.

.3 When an existing yacht either fails to meet the stability standards applied to a new yacht or has up-to-date stability information which complies with a different but defined standard, an Appointed Representative will consider the stability standard of the yacht as a special case and take into account its recorded history of safe operation.

11.2.3 New sailing yachts

.1 Monohulls

Requirements for a new sailing yacht are:

(a) Curves of static stability (GZ curves) for at least the Loaded Departure with 100% consumables and the Loaded Arrival with 10% consumables should be produced.

(b) Generally, the GZ curve required by .1 should have a positive range of not less than 90. A positive range of less than 90 may be considered but subject to the imposition of operational limitations.

(c) In addition to the requirements of .2, the angle of steady heel should be greater than 15 (see figure). The angle of steady heel is obtained from the intersection of a “derived wind heeling lever” (dwhl) curve with the GZ curve required by (a).

In figure 1:

dwhl = the “derived wind heeling lever” at any angle .
= 0.5 x WLO x Cos1.3
where WLO = GZf
Cos1.3f
Figure 1

Noting that:

WLO is the magnitude of the actual wind heeling lever at 0 which would cause the yacht to heel to the ‘down flooding angle’ (f) or 60 whichever is least.

Gzf is the lever of the yacht’s GZ at the ‘down flooding angle’(f) or 60 whichever is least.

d is the angle at which the “derived wind heeling lever” curve intersects the GZ curve. (If d is less than 15, the yacht will be considered as having insufficient stability for the purpose of the Code.)

f the ‘down-flooding angle’ is deemed to occur when openings having an aggregate area, in square meters, greater than:

yacht displacement in tons,
1500

are immersed.

Moreover, it is the angle at which the lower edge of the actual opening that results in critical flooding becomes immersed. All regularly used openings for access and for ventilation should be considered when determining the down flooding angle. No opening regardless of size that may lead to progressive flooding should be immersed at an angle of heel of less than 40. Air pipes to tanks can, however, be disregarded.

If, as a result of immersion of openings in a deckhouse, a yacht cannot meet the required standard, those deckhouse openings may be ignored and the openings in the weather deck used instead to determine f. In such cases, the GZ curve should be derived without the benefit of the buoyancy of the deckhouse.

It might be noted that provided the yacht complies with the requirements of paragraphs 11.2.3.1(a), 11.2.3.1(b) and 11.2.3.1(c) and it is sailed with an angle of heel which is no greater than the ‘derived angle of heel’, it should be capable of withstanding a wind gust equal to 1.4 times the actual wind velocity (i.e., twice the actual wind pressure) without immersing the ‘down flooding openings’, or heeling to an angle greater than 60.

.2 Multihulls

.1 Reference should be made to paragraph 11.1.2 when new multihull sailing yachts are to be certificated in accordance with this Code. Intact stability for catamarans is not defined. It would be appropriate for the owner to demonstrate that their proposals achieve an equivalent level of safety to that required by the Code, i.e., a “safety case.” Such yachts would then be treated as novel vessels in terms of the ILLC.

.2 Intact stability for catamarans of 24 meters in length and over is not defined due to their rarity. It would be appropriate for the owner to demonstrate that their proposals achieve an equivalent level of safety to that required by the Code, i.e., a “safety case.” Such yachts would then be treated as “novel vessels” in terms of the ILLC.

11.2.4 Existing sailing yachts

.1 Existing monohull sailing yachts:

When an Appointed Representative or other Administration recognized authority has approved existing valid stability information, this will continue to be acceptable subject to the following:

.1 verifiable evidence is available which proves that the approved stability information is valid; or

.2 the owner or managing agent elects to re-submit a yacht for stability approval based on the new criteria.

.2 An existing monohull sailing yacht that does not comply with paragraph 11.2.4.1 should comply with paragraph 11.2.3.1 for a new monohull sailing yacht.

11.3 Damaged Stability

11.3.1 General

.1 This Section deals with the standards that should be met for damaged stability.

.2 It should be noted that Damage Stability is applied as part of the Code as an equivalency for non-compliance with full Load Line Conditions of Assignment for vessels less than 80 m in length.

.3 Therefore, it should be noted that compliance with damage stability criteria is not required for vessels less then 80 m in length that obtain full compliance with the ILLC conditions of assignment.

.4 Damage Stability need not be assessed by calculation for yachts of less than 500 GRT which are limited to Category 2, on the basis that the freeboard is greater than the required minimum and the yacht’s restricted service.

11.3.2 New yachts

.1 The watertight bulkheads of the yacht should be so arranged that minor hull damage that results in the free flooding of any one compartment, will cause the yacht to float at a waterline which is not less than 75mm below the weather deck at any point.

.2 Minor damage should be assumed to occur anywhere in the length of the yacht, but not on a watertight bulkhead (transverse or longitudinal). Further, no internal boundaries, decks or flats are assumed to have been breached.

.3 Standard permeabilities should be used in this assessment, as follows in Table 1.

Table 1
Space Percentage Permeability
Stores 60
Stores but not a substantial quantity thereof 95
Accommodation 95
Machinery 85
Liquids 95 or 0 whichever results in the more onerous requirements.

.4 In the damaged condition, considered in paragraph 11.3.1.1, the residual stability should be such that any angle of equilibrium does not exceed 7 from the upright, the resulting righting lever curve has a range to the down flooding angle of at least 15 beyond any angle of equilibrium, the maximum righting lever within that range is not less than 100mm and the area under the curve is not less than 0.015 meter radians.

.5 Progressive flooding between compartments via open stairwells in enclosed superstructures above the margin line need not be considered as long as the margin line is not submerged.

.6 A yacht of 80 meters and above to is subject to damage stability per SOLAS. For vessel’s the keel of which was laid prior to 1 January 2009 compliance with either passenger ship or dry cargo ship standards is required. For vessels the keel of which was laid after 1 January 2009, compliance with the harmonized standards is required as for any cargo ship (See IMO Resolution MSC.194(80)).

11.3.3 Existing yachts

.1 An existing yacht should be assessed according to the requirements of Section 11.3.1 for a new yacht. A summary of the findings should be submitted to an Appointed Representative of the Administration. Where a yacht by reason of age is entitled to use 1959 Load Line Rules, full compliance with 1959 conditions of assignment would exempt the yacht from damage stability requirements provided no major modifications have been made.

.2 When an existing yacht does not meet a standard that is required for a new yacht, the summary of findings should include a review of the consequences of overcoming the deficiency, including compensatory measures that exist or are proposed. Options may include:

.1 operational restrictions on consumables; e.g., such as that the yacht retains on board specified weights in the arrival condition;

.2 full compliance with the ILLC may be examined as an equivalent to the Code damage stability standards for existing motor yachts under 80 meters in load line length given that the damage stability is there as an equivalent to load line conditions of assignment. Note that subdivision is an inherent part of sailing yacht stability.

.3 Pre 1968 yachts built to the 1959 Load Line Rules that allowed for different door arrangements may be taken into consideration; and

.4 geographic restriction to 60 nautical miles from a safe haven (category 2).

.3 Submergence of the weather deck after damage may be accepted provided that:

.1 the yacht retains adequate transverse and longitudinal stability, i.e., complies with paragraph 11.3.1.4 of the Code and has a positive longitudinal GM;

.2 there will be no progressive flooding to spaces assumed intact, i.e., weather tight openings remain above the waterline and are able to be secured weather tight after damage;

.3 if the yacht relies on the buoyancy of an enclosed superstructure or deckhouse to remain afloat, that this structure is efficiently constructed and secured weather tight;

.4 bulkheads limiting the extent of flooding are able to withstand the head of water;

.5 escape routes from compartments assumed intact are not submerged; and

.6 survival craft stowage or boarding points are not submerged.

.4 Inflatable seals in void space between shipside linings and outer shell (where watertight bulkheads are fitted only from shipside lining to shipside lining) are not acceptable as a WT closure.

11.4 Elements of Stability

.1 The lightship weight, vertical center of gravity (KG) and longitudinal center of gravity (LCG) of a yacht should be determined from the results of an inclining experiment.

.2 An inclining experiment should be conducted in accordance with a detailed standard as well as a specific test procedure that is approved on behalf of the Administration. Further, the experiment shall be conducted in the presence of an Authorized Surveyor.

.3 The report of the inclining experiment and the lightship particulars derived should be approved by an Appointed Representative of the Administration.

.1 At the discretion of the owner(s) or managing agent(s) and prior to approval of the light ship particulars by an Appointed Representative of the Administration, a margin for safety may be applied to the light ship weight and KG calculated after the inclining experiment.

.2 Such a margin should be clearly identified and recorded in the stability booklet.

.3 A formal record should be kept in the stability booklet of alterations or modifications to the yacht for which the effects on lightship weight and vertical centers of gravity offset against the margin.

.4 When sister yachts are built at the same shipyard, an Appointed Representative of the Administration may accept lightweight check on subsequent yachts to corroborate the results of the inclining experiment conducted on the lead yacht of the class.

11.5 Stability Documents

.1 A yacht should be provided with a stability information booklet for the Master that is approved by an Appointed Representative of the Administration.

.2 The content, form and presentation of information contained in the stability information booklet should be based on a standard model booklet for the yacht type (motor or sailing) that is acceptable to the Administration.

.3. The standard conditions of loading to be examined shall include the following:

.1 Yacht in the fully loaded departure condition (to the Loadline marks) with full stores, fuel, and potable freshwater and with the full number of crew and other persons with their luggage.

.2 Yacht in the fully loaded arrival condition with the full number of crew and other persons and their luggage, but with only 10 percent stores and fuel remaining.

.4. For all loading conditions, the initial metacentric height and the righting levers curves should be corrected for the effects on free surfaces of liquids in tanks. The correction to initial metacentric height and to the righting arms should be addressed separately in accordance with Section 3.3.7 of the IMO Resolution A.749(18).

.1 Tanks which are taken into consideration when determining the surface correction may be in one of two categories:

.2 Tanks with filling levels fixed (e.g. liquid cargo, water ballast). The free surface correction should be defined for the actual filling level used in each tank.

.3 Tanks with filling levels variable (e.g. consumable liquids such as fuel oil, diesel oil and freshwater). In calculating the free surface in tanks containing consumable liquids, it should be assumed that for each type of liquid at least one transverse pair or single centerline tank has a free surface and the tank or combination of tanks taken into account should be those where the effect of free surface is the greatest.

.5 Sailing yachts should have a copy of the “Curves of Maximum Steady Heel Angle to Prevent Downflooding in Squalls” placed in a suitable position for the ready reference of the crew. This should be a direct copy taken from that contained in the approved stability booklet.

.6 For yacht where the damage stability has not been assessed, the following note should be added o the approved stability booklet:

“This vessel has not been assessed for damage stability, and therefore might not remain afloat in the event of damage or flooding.”

11.6 Major Refit or Alterations

.1 A yacht with previously approved stability information, which undergoes a major refit or alterations, should be subjected to a complete reassessment of stability and provided with newly approved stability information.

.2 A major refit or major alteration is one which results in either a change in the lightship weight of 2% and above and/or the longitudinal center of gravity of 1% and above (measured from the aft perpendicular) and/or the calculated vertical center of gravity rises by 0.25% and above (measured from the keel).

.3 Changes in a yacht’s buoyancy (such as a stern extension) which results in a calculated change in displaced volume of more then 2%, shall require a complete reassessment of stability and newly approved stability information booklets.

.4 Reconfiguration of the vessel’s tank arrangement shall require revision of the vessel stability booklets.

.5 At periodical interval not exceeding five years, a lightweight survey shall be carried out on all yachts to verify any changes in lightship weight and longitudinal center of gravity. The yacht shall be re-inclined whenever, in comparison with the approved stability information, a deviation from the lightship weight exceeding 2% or a deviation of the longitudinal center of gravity exceeding 1% is found or anticipated.

12.0 FREEBOARD

12.1 General

.1 Compliance with the International Load Line Convention, 1966 (ILLC ‘66), is mandatory for all new commercial yachts of 24 meters or more in load line length and existing commercial yachts of 150 gross tons or more as defined in accordance with ILLC ‘66. Private yachts are exempt.

.2 For existing commercial yachts where full compliance with the ILLC cannot be attained, the Administration may consider exemptions in accordance with Article 6 of the Convention.

.3 The freeboard for the yacht and its marking should be approved by an Appointed Representative for the assignment of freeboard and issue of the International Load Line Certificate (1966).

.4 Yachts should comply with the ILLC for the assignment of a greater than minimum freeboard mark which corresponds to the deepest loading condition included in the stability information booklet for the yacht.

.5 The assigned freeboard should reflect damage as well as intact stability, geometry and strength. Any duplicating load line mark should be painted out. The assigned freeboard should ensure compliance with minimum bow height.

.6 The freeboard assigned should be compatible with the strength of hull structure and fittings, intact and damage stability requirements for the yacht.

.7 The Appointed Representative should provide the owner(s) or managing agent(s) of the yacht with a copy of the particulars of the freeboard assigned and a copy of the record of particulars relating to the conditions of assignment.

12.2 Freeboard Mark and Loading

.1 The freeboard mark applied should be an all seasons mark positioned port and starboard at amidships in the load line length. The mark should be permanent and easily seen by raising the mark or using a contrasting color to the hull of the yacht in way of the mark.

.2 The fresh water freeboard allowance should be obtained by deducting from the all seasons freeboard assigned:

Δ/4T millimeters

where Δ = displacement in salt water in tons at the all seasons load waterline, and
T = tons per centimeter immersion in salt water at the all seasons load waterline.

Alternatively, the deduction may be taken as 1/48th of the all seasons draft of the yacht at amidships.

.3 Marking of the fresh water allowance is optional.

.4 A yacht should not operate in any condition that will result in its appropriate freeboard marks being submerged when it is at rest and upright in calm water.

12.3 Draft Marks

.1 Draft marks should be provided at the bow and stem, port and starboard, and be adequate in number for assessing the condition and trim of the yacht. A draft mark may be a single datum line.

.2 Draft marks should be permanent and easily read but need not be of contrasting color to the hull. The marks need not be at more than one (1) draft at each position but should be above and within 1000mm of the deepest load waterline. The paint line of the boot topping may be used if this has permanent marks indented in the hull.

.3 The draft to which marks relate should be indicated either above the mark on the hull and/or in a record on the docking plan for the yacht.

12.4 Docking Plan

The yacht should be provided with a docking plan, a copy of which should be maintained on board.

13.0 LIFE-SAVING APPLIANCES

13.1 General Requirements

13.1.1 Life-Saving Appliances

.1 Vessels of less than 500 GT, should be provided in accordance with the following Table 2, Life-Saving Appliances.

.2 Vessels of 500 GT and over should, in addition to the requirements Table 2 comply with the requirements of SOLAS.

.3 All vessels should be provided with a Life Saving Appliances general arrangement plan (normally combined with the fire control general arrangement plan). Symbols used on the plans should comply with IMO Resolution A.654(16), as may be amended from time to time.

13.1.2 All equipment fitted should be of a type that has been approved in accordance with Marshall Islands Marine Notice 2-011-5, as amended. Unless expressly provided otherwise, all life-saving appliances should comply with SOLAS Chapter III and the LSA Code.

13.1.3 Additional life-saving equipment that may be provided should meet the requirements of Section 13.1.2.

When personal safety equipment is provided for use in water sports activities, arrangements for its stowage should ensure that it will not be used mistakenly as life-saving equipment in an emergency situation.

13.1.4 All life-saving equipment carried should be fitted with retro-reflective material in accordance with the recommendations of IMO Resolution A.658(16). Retro-reflective material already fitted on existing life-saving appliances in accordance with IMO Resolution A.274(III) will continue to be acceptable until it has to be replaced as a result of deterioration or damage. White lifebuoys are not acceptable for yachts of Category 1 or 0. They should be either orange or red and white quartered.

13.1.5 Life raft embarkation arrangements should comply with the following:

.1 Where the distance between the embarkation deck and the top of the life raft buoyancy tube exceeds one (1) meter with the yacht in its lightest condition, an embarkation or rope ladder is to be provided.

.2 Where the distance between the embarkation deck and the top of the life raft buoyancy tube exceeds 4.5 meters with the yacht in its lightest condition, at least one (1) launching appliance for launching a davit launched life raft is to be provided on each side of the yacht.

13.1.6 Cranes

.1 Any inspection, servicing, and repair of cranes, wires, and associated parts should be carried out according to the system for inspection and services developed by the manufacturer. At intervals not exceeding 12 months, the inspection of these items should be performed by the ship’s crew in the presence of the manufacturer’s representative or a person appropriately trained. Records of inspections and routine maintenance carried out by the ship’s crew and the applicable certificates for the launching appliances and equipment should be available. Repairs and replacement of parts should be carried out in accordance with the manufacturer’s requirements and standards.
.2 Cranes used for launching a life-saving appliance must be inspected annually by the manufacturer or a certified crane inspector for safe operation including an inspection of the full length of the falls.

13.1.7 Every inflatable or rigid inflatable rescue boat, inflatable boat, life raft, inflatable and hydrostatic release unit should be serviced, at intervals not exceeding 12 months, at a service station approved by the manufacturer. Hydrostatic release units which have been approved for a service life of more than one year and which should be replaced at the end of their life, need not be serviced.

13.1.8 Maintenance of equipment should be carried out in accordance with the instructions for onboard maintenance. See Section 22.9.

13.1.9 The stowage and installation of all life-saving appliances is to be to the satisfaction of the Appointed Representative.

13.1.10 All life-saving appliances should be in working order and be ready for immediate use before any voyage is commenced and at all times during the voyage.

13.1.11 For a yacht equipped with stabilizer fins or having other projections at the sides of the hull, special consideration should be given and provisions made as necessary to avoid possible interference with the safe evacuation of the yacht in an emergency.

13.1.12 Means should be provided to prevent overboard discharge of water into survival craft during abandonment.

Table 2
LIFE-SAVING APPLIANCES
(see Section 13.1)

Yacht’s Area of Operation Yachts Less Than 500 GT
Category 2 1 0
Life Rafts (see 13.2.2)*
Yes Yes Yes
Rescue Boat (see 13.2.3)
0 0 0
Inflatable Boat (see 13.2.3)
1 1 1
Lifejackets (see 13.2.4)*
To include the 10% spare 100% capacity 100% capacity 100% capacity
Immersion Suits (see 13.2.5)
100% capacity 100% capacity 100% capacity
Thermal Protective Aids (see 13.2.6)
100% capacity 100% capacity 100% capacity
Life Buoys (Total) (see 13.2.7)
4 4 6
Life Buoys with Light and Smoke; or SOLAS-approved strobe 2 2 2
Life Buoys with Buoyant Line 2 2 2
Line Throwing Appliance with spare charge(s) (see 13.2.8)
1 1 1
Rocket Parachute Flares 4 4 6
Red Hand Flares 6 6 12
Smoke Signals 2 2 2
Portable VHF 2 3 3
EPIRBS (see 13.2.9)
1 1 1
SARTS (see 13.2.10)
1 1 2
General Alarm (see 13.2.11)
1 1 1
Posters and Signs Showing Survival Craft and Equipment Operating Instructions Yes Yes Yes
Training Manual (see 22.7)
Yes Yes Yes
Documented Safety Management System (see Annex 13)
Yes Yes Yes
Lifesaving Signals and Rescue Poster (see 13.2.13)
Yes Yes Yes
MOB Recovery System (see 22.4)
1 1 1

13.2 Equipment Carriage Requirements

13.2.1 Lifeboats

.1 When lifeboats are required to be carried their acceptance is conditional upon the provision of suitable stowage and launching arrangements.

.2 When lifeboats are provided on each side of the yacht, the lifeboats on each side should be of sufficient capacity to accommodate the total number of persons onboard.

.3 Where it is impractical to carry lifeboats on a yacht, alternative arrangements may be considered as indicated in paragraphs 13.2.1.4 and 13.2.2.5.

.4 For yachts of 85m in load line length and over, when it is impractical to carry lifeboats on each side of the yacht, alternative arrangements will be considered provided the required subdivision index meets the requirements of paragraph 11.3.2.6.

.5 A lifeboat will also be acceptable as a rescue boat provided it meets the requirements for an approved rescue boat as indicated in Section 13.2.3.

13.2.2 Life rafts

.1 The life rafts carried are to be stowed in GRP containers and must contain the necessary “emergency pack”, the contents of which are dependent upon the yacht’s limiting Category (see paragraph 13.2.2.9).

.2 Life rafts carried should be of equal, or as near equal, capacity as possible.

.3 Life raft approval includes approval of their stowage, launching and float-free arrangements.

.4 A yacht should be provided with life rafts of such number and capacity that, in the event of any one (1) life raft being lost or rendered unserviceable, there is sufficient capacity remaining for all on board.

.5 For a yacht of less than 85m in load line length, one (1) or more life rafts are to be provided on each side of the yacht of sufficient aggregate capacity to accommodate the total number of persons onboard. Life rafts are to be readily transferable for launching on either side of the yacht.

If life rafts are not readily transferable, additional life rafts should be fitted so that life rafts having a total capacity of 150% of the yacht’s complement are provided on each side of the yacht.

.6 For a sailing yacht, when it is impractical to stow the life rafts required by paragraph 13.2.2.5 at the yacht’s side, alternative arrangements could be accepted to provide life rafts having a capacity of 150% of the yacht’s complement stowed on the centerline, subject to their being readily transferable to either side of the yacht.

.7 When lifeboats are provided in accordance with paragraph 13.2.1.2, sufficient life rafts are to be fitted on each side of the yacht capable of accommodating 50% of the total number of persons onboard. Life rafts are to be readily transferable for launching on either side of the yacht.

If life rafts are not readily transferable, additional life rafts having a total capacity of 100% of the yacht’s complement should be provided on each side of the yacht.

.8 GRP containers containing life rafts should be stowed on the weather deck or in an open space and fitted with hydrostatic release units so that the life rafts will float free of the yacht and automatically inflate.

.9 For a yacht that operates beyond 60 miles from land, all the life rafts provided should be equipped with a “SOLAS A PACK”. For yachts that always operate within 60 miles from land, the pack can be a “SOLAS B PACK.

Table 3

LIFE RAFT EQUIPMENT (SOLAS) A PACK B PACK
1 one (1) buoyant rescue quoit, attached to not less than 30 meters of buoyant line with a breaking strength of at least 1.0 kilo Newton; X X
2 one (1) safety knife of the non-folding type having a buoyant handle and stowed in a pocket on the upper buoyancy tube near the entrance adjacent to the painter and secured to the life raft by a light line of sufficient length to enable the painter to be readily cut. In addition, a life raft that is permitted to accommodate 13 persons or more shall be provided with a second safety knife that need not be of the non-folding type. The stowage position of the knife shall be highlighted; X X
3 for a life raft which is permitted to accommodate not more than 12 persons, one (1) buoyant bailer; for a life raft permitted to accommodate 13 persons or more, two (2) buoyant bailers; X X
4 two (2) sponges; X X
5 two (2) sea-anchors, one (1) being spare and the other permanently attached to the life raft in such a way as to be readily deployable when the life raft inflates to enable the life raft to lie oriented to the wind in the most stable manner; X X
6 two (2) buoyant paddles; X X
7 three (3) tin openers; and a pair of safety scissors. Safety knives containing special tin opener blades are satisfactory for this equipment; X
8 one (1) first-aid outfit; X X
9 one (1) whistle or equivalent sound signal; X X
10 four (4) rocket parachute flares; X ½
11 six (6) hand flares; X ½
12 two (2) buoyant smoke signals; X ½
13 one (1) waterproof flashlight suitable for Morse signaling together with a spare set of batteries and a spare bulb in a waterproof container; X X
14 An efficient radar reflector unless a radar transponder is stowed in the life raft; X X
15 One (1) daylight signaling mirror with instructions on its use; X X
16 one (1) copy of rescue signal tables; X X
17 one (1) set of fishing tackle; X
18 food rations totaling not less than 10,000 calories for each person the life raft is permitted to accommodate; stowed in a watertight container; X
19 watertight receptacles containing a total of 1.5 liters of fresh water for each person the life raft is permitted to accommodate, of which 0.5 liters per person may be replaced by a de-salting apparatus capable of producing an equal amount of fresh water in two (2) days or one (1) liter per person may be replaced by a manually powered reverse osmosis desalinator capable of producing an equal amount of fresh water in two (2) days; X
20 one (1) rust-proof drinking cup graduated in milliliters; X
21 six (6) doses of anti-seasickness medicine and one (1) seasickness bag for each person the life raft is permitted to accommodate; X X
22 instructions printed in English on how to survive; X X
23 instructions for immediate action; X X
24 thermal protective aids sufficient for 10% of the number of persons the life raft is permitted to accommodate, or two (2), whichever is the greater; X X
25 one (1) repair kit for repairing punctures in buoyancy compartments; X X
26 one (1) topping-up pump or bellows. X X

13.2.3 Rescue boats

.1 General

All rescue boats covered in this section are to be equipped in accordance with the IMO Lifesaving Appliances Code Chapter V/5.1.2. Reference is also made to paragraph 22.4.

.2 Yachts of 500 GT and over

(a) A rescue boat meeting SOLAS requirements should be provided. The approved rescue boat should have a capacity for not less than six (6) persons. A rigid inflatable boat (RIB) or tender may be accepted subject to paragraph 13.2.3.2.

(b) The acceptance of an approved rescue boat is conditional upon the provision of suitable stowage and launching arrangements. The launching arrangements should be of an approved type and/or acceptable to the Administration. When a power-operated crane is used as a launching device, it should be capable of operation by hand in the event of a power failure. A secondary power source, e.g., emergency generator power, battery or hydraulic pump, is acceptable in lieu of emergency hand operation of the rescue boat crane. It should be possible to launch the boat within five (5) minutes.

.3 Yachts of less than 500 GT

When a SOLAS approved rescue boat is not carried on board, alternative arrangements may be considered. These include:

(a) a rescue boat of a SOLAS approved type which is towed by the main yacht; or

(b) a boat that is suitable for rescue purposes carried on board but which is of a non-SOLAS approved type. The boat should have a capacity for not less than four (4) persons and may be a rigid, rigid inflatable or inflatable tender. Tubes of a non-SOLAS inflatable boat should have a minimum of three (3) buoyancy compartments built in; and

(c) the ability to efficiently use the yacht itself to recover an unconscious person from the water.

.4 A white boat instead of orange may be used provided it has high visibility panels and is properly equipped.

.5 Launching rescue boats on the fore deck is accepted as a practical necessity, since it would normally be possible to maneuver the yacht to provide a lee position for the rescue boat. The ability to launch the rescue boat from either side of the yacht is not a requirement.

.6 For yachts of less than 500 gross tons, there shall be no requirement to recover the rescue boat if the casualty can be recovered on board from the rescue boat while still in the water.

.7 Launching appliances see paragraph 13.2.3.2.

13.2.4 Lifejackets

.1 One (1) adult SOLAS lifejacket should be provided for each person on board plus spare adult lifejackets sufficient for at least 10% of the total number of persons on board or two (2), whichever is the greater. Each lifejacket should be fitted with a light and whistle.

.2 There should be at least two (2) SOLAS inflatable lifejackets included in the above number of lifejackets for use of the crew of any rescue boat or inflatable boat carried on board.

.3 In addition to the adult lifejackets, a sufficient number of children’s lifejackets should be provided for children carried on the yacht.

13.2.5 Immersion suits

.1 One immersion suit complying with the requirements of Section 13.1.2 should be provided for each person onboard. However, these need not be provided if:

.1 totally enclosed or partially enclosed lifeboats are fitted; or

.2 davit launched life rafts are provided; or

.3 the yacht operates all year round on voyages between the parallels of latitude 30 North and 30 South or exempted under paragraph 13.2.5.2.

In the case of a yacht that is provided with means for dry-shod emergency evacuation covered by .1 or .2, at least two (2) immersion suits should be provided for use by the crew of the rescue boat (see Section 13.2.3).

.2 Owners or managing agents of yachts which operate outside of the parallels of latitude 30 North and 30 South but in areas where the sea water temperature at the time of operation is known and considered to be high enough for dispensation from the safety provision of immersion suits, should apply to the Administration for exemption from the requirements. Full details of the proposed location, period of operation and established temperature data from recognized authorities should be provided. Immersion suits shall always be provided for the rescue boat crew and for the crew on repositioning voyages.

13.2.6 Thermal protective aids

One (1) thermal protective aid complying with the requirements of Section 13.1.2 should be provided for each person onboard. However, where immersion suits are provided for all persons on board per section 13.2.5, then thermal protective aids need not be provided.

In no case shall thermal protective aids be considered equivalent to the requirement for the carriage of immersion suits.

13.2.7 Life buoys

.1 Life buoys port and starboard provided with combined light and smoke signals should be capable of quick release from the navigating bridge. When this is impractical, they may be stowed at the side of the yacht and provided with conventional release arrangements.

.2 The attached buoyant line required on each of two (2) of the life buoys is to have a minimum length of 30 meters.

.3 For yachts of less than 500 GT, the Light and Smoke MOB signal may be replaced by a SOLAS approved marker strobe light.

.4 Each lifebuoy should be marked with vessel’s name and Port of Registry.

13.2.8 Line Throwing Appliance

For vessels in Category 2, appliances capable of firing two shots of line are required, for all other categories four shots of line capability is required.

13.2.9 EPIRB

The 406MHz EPIRB should be installed in an easily accessible position ready to be manually released, capable of being placed in a survival craft or floating free if the yacht sinks.

13.2.10 Radar transponders (SART)

The SART is to be stowed in an easily accessible position so that it can be rapidly placed in any survival craft. Means to be provided in order that it can be mounted in the survival craft at a height of at least 1 meter above sea level.

13.2.11 General alarm

.1 For a yacht of less than 500 GT, this alarm may consist of the yacht’s whistle or siren.

.2 For a yacht of 500 GT and above, the requirements of Section 13.2.9 are to be supplemented by an electrically operated bell or Klaxon system, which is to be powered from the yacht’s main supply and also the emergency source of power (see Section 8.0).

.3 For a yacht of 85m in load line length and above, in addition to the requirements of Section 13.2.9, a public address system or other suitable means of communication should be provided.

13.2.12 Lighting

.1 Alleyways, internal and external stairways and exits giving access to and including the muster and embarkation stations should be adequately lighted. For a yacht of 500 GT and above, the lighting should be supplied from the emergency source of power (see Section 8.0).

.2 Adequate lighting is to be provided in the vicinity of survival craft, launching appliance(s) (when provided) and the overside area of sea in way of the launching position(s). The lighting should be supplied from the emergency source of power.

13.2.13 Life-Saving signals and rescue poster

When display space in the wheelhouse is restricted, the two (2) sides of a SOLAS No. 2 poster (as contained in life raft equipment packs) may be displayed in lieu of a SOLAS No. 1 poster. Symbols used should conform to IMO Resolution A.760(18), as amended.

14.0 FIRE SAFETY AND STRUCTURAL FIRE PROTECTION

14.1 Fire Safety

14.1.1 Stowage of Gasoline and other highly flammable liquids

.1 Special consideration should be given to safe conditions of carriage of gasoline and other highly flammable liquids either in hand portable containers/tanks or in the tanks of vehicles (such as personal water craft, automobiles and helicopter) which may be transported from time to time. Alternatives to consider may be:

.1 recessed stowage with overboard chutes;

.2 lockers on deck, fully ventilated and with fixed fire suppression system; or

.3 internal lockers with fixed fire suppression system.

.2 The quantity of gasoline and/or other highly flammable liquids carried should be kept to a minimum, generally up to 150 liters maximum.

.3 Containers used for the carriage of flammable liquids should be constructed to a recognized standard appropriate to the contents and each container clearly marked to indicate its contents.

.4 Enclosed spaces designated for the safe carriage of gasoline or vehicles with gasoline in their tanks should be fitted with:

.1 a fixed fire detection and fire alarm system complying with the requirements of SOLAS;

.2 a manually activated deluge water spray system of capacity to cover the total area of deck and container/vehicle support platform(s) (if any) at a rate of 3.5 liters/m² per minute, or

For a space in which the provision of a deluge system would be inappropriate/ impractical, alternative provisions should be made to the satisfaction of the Administration. (Consideration should be given to the provision of a water spray from at least one (1) fire hose fitted with a jet/spray nozzle being brought to bear on any part of the gasoline stowage from the entrance(s) to the space.);

.3 adequate provisions for drainage of water introduced to the space by paragraph 14.1.1.4.2. Drainage should not lead to machinery or other spaces where a source of ignition may exist; and

.4 a ducted mechanical continuous supply of air ventilation, which is isolated from other ventilated spaces, to provide at least six (6) air changes per hour (based on the empty space) and for which reduction of the airflow should be signaled by an audible and visual alarm on the navigating bridge and at the “in port” control station(s). The ventilation system should be capable of rapid shut down and effective closure in event of fire.

.5 Electrical equipments should be located well clear of those areas where flammable gases are likely to accumulate within the space and be so constructed as to prevent the escape of sparks. Electrical equipments not so located or constructed should each be provided with an easily accessible and identified means of double pole isolation outside the space, with a fixed flammable gas detector/detectors fitted in the compartment and comprising alarm features on the navigating bridge and elsewhere in the accommodation in accordance with paragraph 14.3.3.14.2. Where any of these requirements are not practical, then the electrical arrangements should be installed to a suitably certified standard, i.e., flameproof, intrinsically safe, etc.

.6 The location of gasoline storage, quantities of gasoline and procedures to be followed in an emergency should be approved and recorded on the fire safety plan and/or safety manual, as appropriate.

.7 Reference should be made to Section 24.2 if there is a requirement to provide for helicopter operations to/from the yacht.

14.1.2 Fire Control Plans

.1 A fire control (general arrangement) plan should be permanently exhibited for the guidance of the Master and crew of the yacht. The content of the plan should adequately show and describe (in English) the principal fire prevention and protection equipment and materials. As far as practicable, symbols used on the plan should comply with the recognized international standard provided in IMO Resolution A.654(16) as may be amended from time to time.

For each deck, the plan should show the position of control stations; sections of the yacht which are enclosed respectively by “A” class divisions and “B” class divisions; location of flammable liquid storage (see Section 14.1); particulars of and locations of fire alarms, fire detection systems, sprinkler installations, fixed and portable fire extinguishing appliances; fireman’s outfit(s); means of access and emergency escapes for compartments and decks; and locations and means of control of systems and openings which should be closed down in a fire emergency.

.2 The plan required by paragraph 14.1.2.1 should be kept up to date. Up-dating alterations should be applied to all copies of the plan without delay. Each plan should include a list of alterations and the date on which each alteration was applied.

.3 A duplicate set of the plan should be permanently stored in a prominently marked weathertight enclosure readily accessible to assist non-vessel fire-fighting personnel who may board the yacht in a fire emergency.

.4 Instructions valid to the maintenance and operation of all the equipment and installations onboard for the fighting and containment of fire should be kept in one (1) document holder, readily available in an accessible location.

14.2 Structural fire protection for yachts of less than 500 GT

14.2.1 Boundaries

.1 The boundaries of a space containing internal combustion propulsion machinery on a new yacht should be:

.1 gas tight;

.2 capable of preventing the passage of smoke and flame to the end of the 60 minute standard fire test; and

.3 so insulated where necessary with a suitable non-combustible material, that if the division is exposed to a standard fire test, the average temperature on the unexposed side of the division should not increase by more than 139˚C above the initial temperature within a period of 30 minutes.

.2 When boundaries are constructed of materials other than steel or aluminum, calculation methods may be used where appropriate to determine compliance with .2 and .3 above.

.3 Galleys should be enclosed wherever possible.

.4 Application to existing yachts should be as far as practicable to the standard for new yachts, it being understood that structural alterations will generally not be practicable.

14.2.2 Fuel tanks/systems

.1 See paragraph 7.1.2.2.

.2 Fuel tanks and associated pipes and fittings should be located to reduce to a minimum the risk of fire or explosion.

.3 Spaces containing such items should be provided with an adequate and efficient ventilation system.

14.2.3 Ventilation

.1 In a yacht provided with a gas extinguishing system within an enclosed machinery space, arrangements should be provided for the closure of all openings to the machinery space that can admit air. Additionally, means should be provided for stopping all ventilation fans supplying the machinery space along with the means to cut off the supply of fuel to the engine(s) and any auxiliaries in the event of a fire within the machinery space.

.2 The above arrangements should be capable of being operated from outside the machinery space.

14.2.4 Means of Escape

.1 The arrangement of the hull should be such that all underdeck compartments are provided with a satisfactory means of escape. In the case of the under deck and above deck accommodations and engine room spaces, two (2) means of escape from every restricted space or group of spaces should be provided. Only in an exceptional case should one (1) means of escape be accepted, and then only if the means of escape provided does not require passage through a hazardous area, e.g., a galley or engine room, leads directly to the open air and it can be demonstrated that the provision or retrofitting of a second means of escape would be impractical or detrimental to the overall safety of the yacht. No escape route should be obstructed by furniture or fittings.

.2 Where a second means of escape is via a sealed window, then breakable glass, not polycarbonate or laminated glass, which can be readily broken with a conveniently located crash hammer, may be accepted. Weatherdeck flush hatches may be used as passenger or crew area secondary escapes, but as they are more prone to leakage and more difficult to use, their fitting should be avoided if possible.

.3 All doors in escape routes are to be able to be opened from either side. In the direction of escape they are to be able to open without the use of a key. All handles on the inside of weathertight doors and hatches are to be non removable.

14.2.5 Passage of Flame

When a yacht is not Classed by a Classification Society recognized by the Administration and the hull, bulkheads, and main deck are constructed of materials other than steel, evidence of precautions taken to reduce the passage of flame should be submitted to the Appointed Representative for approval.

14.2.6 Thermal or Acoustic Insulation

Thermal or acoustic insulation fitted should be of a type that is not readily ignitable and, where fitted within a machinery space that does not contain either internal combustion propulsion machinery or oil-fired boilers, the surface of the insulation is to be impervious to oil and oil vapor. Insulation provided within a machinery space that contains either internal combustion propulsion machinery or oil-fired boilers must be of a non-combustible type as defined by SOLAS and the surface of the insulation is also to be impervious to oil and oil vapor. A period of grace not to exceed one (1) year may be given for compliance with this requirement.

14.2.7 Paints, Varnishes and Other Finishes

Paints, varnishes and other finishes which offer an undue fire hazard, should not be used in the engine room or galley or in other areas of high fire risk. Elsewhere such finishes should be kept to a minimum.

14.2.8 Upholstery Composites

Upholstery composites (fabric in association with any backing or padding material) used throughout the yacht should satisfy fire test procedures of IMO Resolution MSC.61(67), Annex 1, Part 8, as amended, or an equivalent standard.

.1 Organic foams used in upholstered furniture and mattresses should be of the combustion-modified type satisfying the fire test procedures of IMO Resolution MSC.61(67), Annex 1, Part 9, or an equivalent standard.

.2 Suspended textile materials such as curtains or drapes should satisfy the fire test procedures of IMO Resolution MSC.61(67), Annex 1, Part 7, or be of equivalent standard.

14.2.9 Open Flame Gas Appliances

.1 An open flame gas appliance provided for cooking, heating or any other purpose should comply with the requirements of ISO 10239 or equivalent.

.2 The installation of an open flame gas appliance should comply with the appropriate provisions of Annex 3.

14.2.10 Fire Detection and Fire Alarm System

.1 A fire detection and fire alarm system should be fitted. It should be provided with a control panel located within the wheelhouse, and with audible alarms provided in locations where they are most likely to be heard. The system should be comprised of smoke, heat or other suitable detectors fitted in the machinery space and galley as a minimum; and in yachts of 30 meters in load line length and over, suitable detectors should be fitted in all enclosed spaces except those that afford no substantial fire risk.

.2 In the exceptional case of a space or compartment having only one (1) means of escape (Section 14.2.4), the integrity of the escape route should be protected by the installation of smoke detectors that should give instantaneous early warning of danger by means of audible and visible alarms in the space or compartment, audible throughout the yacht.

14.2.11 Ventilation Trunking

.1 Ventilation trunking emanating from either a machinery space or a galley should not, in general, pass through the accommodation spaces. Where this is unavoidable, the trunking should be constructed to the satisfaction of one (1) of the recognized Classification Societies listed in Section 28.1. The trunking within the accommodation should be fitted with:

(a) fire insulation to “A-60” standard to a point at least five (5) meters from the machinery space or galley; and

(b) automatic fire dampers located in the deck or bulkhead within the accommodation where the trunking passes from the machinery space or galley into the accommodation.

.2 Where trunking arrangements in the galley do not meet these standards, a properly installed fire suppression system over the cooking range and over any deep fat fryer, must be fitted.

14.3 Structural fire protection for yachts of 500 GT and over

14.3.1 Definitions

Terms used in this section should have the same meaning as defined in SOLAS, except as follows:

“Low flame spread” means that the surface thus described will adequately restrict the spread of flame, this being determined to the satisfaction of an Appointed Representative of the Administration by an established procedure;

“Main vertical zone” means those sections into which the hull, superstructure and deckhouses are divided by A class divisions, the mean length of which on any deck does not normally exceed 40 meters; and

“Not readily ignitable” means that the surface thus described will not continue to burn for more than 20 seconds after removal of a suitable impinging test flame.

14.3.2 Existing Yachts

The requirements for yachts of less than 500 GT, should be complied with and, in addition:

.1 Evidence of precautions taken to reduce the passage of flame throughout accommodation and service spaces should be submitted to an Appointed Representative for approval. Such precautions may include the enclosure of stairways and appropriate protection of escape routes.

.2 A fixed fire detection system and fire alarm system of an approved type and complying with the requirements of SOLAS Chapter II-2/Part A should be so installed and arranged to detect the presence of fire in all accommodation and service spaces, except spaces which afford no substantial fire risk.

.3 A yacht at all times when at sea, or in port (except when out of service), should be manned or equipped to ensure that any initial fire alarm is immediately received by a responsible member of the crew.

.4 Furniture in corridors and escape routes should be of a type and quantity not likely to obstruct escape.

14.3.3 New Yachts

New yachts should have a level of fire protection per the requirements of SOLAS Chapter II-2/Part A and comply with the following:

14.3.3.1 Ventilation systems

.1 Ventilation ducts should be of non-combustible material. Short ducts, however, not generally exceeding 2m in length and with a cross-section not exceeding 0.02m2 need not be non-combustible, subject to the following conditions:

(a) they should be of a suitable material having regard to the risk of fire;

(b) they should be used only at the end of the ventilation device; and

(c) they should not be situated less than 600mm, measured along the duct, from an opening in an “A” or “B” class division including continuous “B” class ceilings.

.2 Where ventilation ducts with a free cross-sectional area exceeding 0.02m2 pass through class “A” bulkheads or decks, the opening should be lined with a steel sheet sleeve unless the ducts passing through the bulkheads or decks are of steel in the vicinity of passage through the deck or bulkhead and the ducts and sleeves should comply in this part with the following:

(a) Sleeves should have a thickness of at least 3mm and a length of at least 900mm. When passing through bulkheads, this length should be divided preferably into 450mm on each side of the bulkhead. The ducts, or sleeves lining such ducts, should be provided with fire insulation. The insulation should have at least the same fire integrity as the bulkhead or deck through which the duct passes.

(b) Ducts with a free cross-sectional area exceeding 0.075m2 should be fitted with fire dampers in addition to the requirements of .1 above. The fire damper should operate automatically but should also be capable of being closed manually from both sides of the bulkhead or deck. The damper should be provided with an indicator that shows whether the damper is open or closed. Fire dampers are not required, however, where ducts pass through spaces surrounded by “A” class divisions, without serving those spaces, provided those ducts have the same fire integrity as the divisions that they pierce.

.3 Ducts provided for the ventilation of a machinery space of Category A or a galley, should not pass through accommodation spaces, service spaces or control stations unless they comply with the conditions specified in paragraphs (a) to (d) or (e) and (f) below:

(a) they are constructed of steel having a thickness of at least 3mm and 5mm for duct widths or diameters of up to and including 300mm and 760mm and over respectively and, in the case of ducts with widths or diameters between 300mm and 760mm thickness should be obtained by interpolation;

(b) they are suitably supported and stiffened;

(c) they are fitted with automatic fire dampers close to the boundaries penetrated; and

(d) they are insulated to “A-60” standard from a machinery space or galley to a point at least 5m beyond each fire damper; or

(e) they are constructed of steel in accordance with (a) and (b) above; and

(f) they are insulated to “A-60” standard throughout accommodation spaces, service spaces or control stations;
except that penetrations of main zone divisions should also comply with the requirements of paragraph 14.3.3.1.8 below.

.4 Ducts provided for ventilation to accommodation spaces, service spaces or control stations should not pass through a machinery space of Category A or a galley unless they comply with the conditions specified in paragraphs (a) to (c) or (d) and (e) below:

(a) where they pass through a machinery space of Category A or galley, ducts are constructed of steel in accordance with paragraphs 14.3.3.1.3(a) & (b) above;

(b) automatic fire dampers are fitted close to the boundaries penetrated; and

(c) the integrity of the machinery space or galley boundaries is maintained at penetrations; or

(d) where they pass through a machinery space of Category A or galley, ducts are constructed of steel in accordance with paragraphs 14.3.3.1.3(a) & (b) above; and

(e) within a machinery space or galley, ducts are insulated to “A-60” standard;

except that penetrations of main zone divisions should also comply with the requirements of paragraph 14.3.3.1.8 below.

.5 Ventilation ducts with a free cross-sectional area exceeding 0.02m2 passing through “B” class bulkheads should be lined with steel sheet sleeves of 900mm in length divided preferably into 450mm on each side of the bulkheads, unless the duct is of steel for this length.

.6 For a control station outside machinery spaces, practical measures should be taken to ensure that ventilation, visibility and freedom from smoke are maintained so that, in the event of fire, the machinery and equipment contained in the control station may be supervised and continue to function effectively. Alternative and separate means of air supply should be provided; air inlets of the two (2) sources of supply should be so disposed that the risk of both inlets drawing in smoke simultaneously is minimized. These requirements need not apply to control stations situated on, and opening on to, an open deck, or where local closing arrangements would be equally effective.

.7 Exhaust duct(s) from a galley range should be constructed of “A-60” class divisions where it passes through accommodation spaces and/or spaces containing combustible materials. An exhaust duct should be fitted with:

(a) a grease trap readily removable for cleaning;

(b) a fire damper located in the lower end of the duct;

(c) arrangements for shutting off the exhaust fans, operable from within the galley; and

(d) fixed means for extinguishing a fire within the duct.

.8 When it is necessary for a ventilation duct to pass through a main vertical zone division, a fail-safe automatic closing fire damper should be fitted adjacent to the division. The damper should also be capable of being manually closed from each side of the division. The operating position should be readily accessible and be marked in red light-reflecting color. The duct between the division and the damper should be of steel or other equivalent material and, if necessary, insulated to comply with the requirements of SOLAS Chapter II-2/18.1.1. The damper should be fitted on at least one (1) side of the division with a visible indicator showing whether the damper is in the open position.

.9 Inlets and outlets of ventilation systems should be capable of being closed from outside the space being ventilated.

.10 Power ventilation of accommodation spaces, service spaces, control stations and machinery spaces should be capable of being stopped from an easily accessible position outside the space being served. This position should not be readily cut off in the event of a fire in the spaces served. The means provided for stopping the power ventilation of a machinery space should be entirely separate from the means provided for stopping ventilation of other spaces.

14.3.3.2 Structure

.1 The hull, superstructures, structural bulkheads, decks and deckhouses should be constructed of steel or other equivalent material.

.2 However, in cases where any part of the structure is of aluminum alloy, the following should apply:

(a) Insulation of aluminum alloy components of “A” or “B” class divisions, except structure that, in the opinion of the Appointed Representative, is non-load-bearing, should be such that the temperature of the structural core does not rise more than 200C above the ambient temperature at any time during the applicable fire exposure to the standard fire test.

(b) Special attention should be given to the insulation of aluminum alloy components of columns, stanchions and other structural members required to support lifeboat and life raft stowage, launching and embarkation areas, and “A” and “B” class divisions to ensure that for members:

(1) supporting lifeboat and life raft areas and “A” class divisions, the temperature rise limitation specified in .1 above should apply at the end of one (1) hour; and

(2) supporting “B” class divisions, the temperature rise limitation specified in .1 above should apply at the end of half an hour.

.3 Crowns and casings of a machinery space of Category A should be of steel construction adequately insulated and openings therein, if any, should be suitably arranged and protected to prevent the spread of fire.

.4 In a yacht of less than 1000 GT, crowns and casings of a machinery space of Category A need not be of steel provided they are “A-60” divisions and provision is made for boundary cooling through two (2) fire hoses supplied simultaneously from the emergency fire pump with drainage of cooling water overside through scuppers of suitable capacity.

14.3.3.3 Main vertical zones and horizontal zones

.1 Hull superstructure and deckhouses in way of accommodation and service spaces should be subdivided into main vertical zones by “A” class divisions. These divisions should have insulation values in accordance with Tables 3 and 4 below.

.2 As far as practicable, the bulkheads forming the boundaries of the main vertical zones should be in line with watertight subdivision bulkheads.

.3 Such bulkheads should extend from deck to deck and to the shell or other boundaries.

.4 When a main vertical zone is subdivided by “A” class divisions for the purpose of providing an appropriate barrier between sprinklered and non-sprinklered spaces, the divisions should be insulated in accordance with the fire insulation and integrity values given in Tables 3 and 4 below.

14.3.3.4 Bulkheads within a main vertical zone

.1 All bulkheads within accommodation and service spaces which are not required to “A” class divisions should be at least “B” class or “C” class divisions as prescribed in the Tables 3 and 4 below.

.2 All such divisions may be faced with combustible materials in accordance with the provisions of Section 14.3.3.11 below.

.3 All corridor bulkheads where not required to be “A” class should be “B” class divisions which should extend from deck to deck except:

(a) when continuous “B” class ceilings or linings are fitted on both sides of the bulkhead, the portion of the bulkhead behind the continuous ceilings or linings should be of material which, in thickness and composition, is acceptable in the construction of “B” class divisions but which should be required to meet “B” class integrity standards only in so far as is reasonable and practical in the opinion of the Appointed Representative;

(b) throughout spaces protected by an automatic sprinkler, fire detection and fire alarm system complying with the provisions of paragraph 14.3.3.13.1(a), the corridor bulkheads of “B” class materials may terminate at a ceiling in the corridor provided such a ceiling is of material which, in thickness and composition, is acceptable in the construction of “B” class divisions. Notwithstanding the requirements of Section 14.3.3.5, such bulkheads and ceilings should be required to meet “B” class integrity standards only in so far as is reasonable and practicable. All doors and frames in such bulkheads should be so constructed and erected to provide substantial fire resistance.

.4 All bulkheads required to be “B” class divisions, except corridor bulkheads, should extend from deck to deck and to the shell or other boundaries unless continuous “B” class ceilings or linings are fitted on both sides of the bulkhead, in which case the bulkhead may terminate at the continuous ceiling or lining.

14.3.3.5 Fire integrity of bulkheads and decks

.1 In addition to complying with the specific provisions for fire integrity of bulkheads and decks mentioned elsewhere in this section, the minimum fire integrity of bulkheads and decks should be as prescribed in Tables 3 and 4 below.

.2 The following requirements should govern application of the Tables:

(a) Tables 3 and 4 below should apply respectively to the bulkheads and decks separating adjacent spaces.

(b) For determining the appropriate fire integrity standards to be applied to divisions between adjacent spaces, such spaces are classified according to their fire risk as shown in categories (1) to (9) below. The title of each Category is intended to be typical rather than restrictive. The number in parentheses preceding each Category refers to the applicable column or row in the Tables.

(1) Control stations Spaces containing emergency sources of power and lighting.
Wheelhouse and chartroom. Spaces containing the yacht’s radio equipment.
Fire-extinguishing rooms, fire control rooms and fire-recording stations.
Control room for propulsion machinery when located outside the machinery space.
Spaces containing centralized fire alarm equipment.

(2) Corridors and lobbies

(3) Accommodation spaces

Spaces so defined, excluding corridors.

(4) Stairways

Interior stairways, lifts and escalators (other than those wholly contained within the machinery space(s)) and enclosures thereto.

In this connection, a stairway that is enclosed only at one (1) level should be regarded as part of the space from which it is not separated by a fire door.

(5) Service spaces (low risk)

Lockers and storerooms not having provisions for the storage of flammable liquids and having areas less than 4M² and drying rooms and laundries.

(6) Machinery spaces of Category A

Spaces so defined.

(7) Other machinery spaces

Spaces so defined, excluding machinery spaces of Category A.

(8) Service spaces (high risk)

Galleys, pantries containing cooking appliances, paint and lamp rooms, lockers and store-rooms having areas of 4m2 or more, spaces for the storage of flammable liquids, and workshops other than those forming part of the machinery spaces.

(9) Open decks

Open deck spaces and enclosed promenades having no fire risk. Air spaces (the space outside superstructures and deckhouses).

(c) In determining the applicable fire integrity standard of a boundary between two (2) spaces within a main vertical zone or horizontal zone which is not protected by a sprinkler system complying with the provisions of paragraph 14.3.3.13.1(b) below or between such zones neither of which is so protected, the higher of the two (2) values given in Tables 3 and 4 should apply.

(d) In determining the applicable fire integrity standard of a boundary between two (2) spaces within a main vertical zone or horizontal zone which is protected by a sprinkler system complying with the provisions of paragraph 14.3.3.13.1(b) below or between such zones both of which are so protected, the lesser of the two (2) values given in the Tables should apply. Where a sprinklered zone and a non-sprinklered zone meet within accommodation and service spaces, the higher of the two (2) values given in Tables 3 and 4 should apply to the division between the zones.

Table 3
Fire integrity of bulkheads separating adjacent spaces
Spaces (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)
Control stations
(1) A-0c A-0 A-60 A-0 A-15 A-60 A-15 A-60 *
Corridors and lobbies
(2) Cc B-0c A-0a
B-0c B-0c A-60 A-0 A-15
A-0d *
Accommodation spaces
(3) Cc A-0a
B-0c B-0c A-60 A-0 A-15
A-0d *
Stairways
(4) A-0a
B-0c A-0a
B-0c A-60 A-0 A-15
A-0d *
Service spaces (low risk)
(5) Cc A-60 A-0 A-0 *
Machinery spaces of Category A
(6) A-0 A-60 *
Other machinery spaces
(7) A-0b A-0 *
Service spaces (high risk)
(8) A-0b *
Open decks
(9)

Table 4
Fire integrity of decks separating adjacent spaces
Spaces above
Spaces below (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)
Control stations
(1) A-0 A-0 A-0 A-0 A-0 A-60 A-0 A-0 *
Corridors and lobbies
(2) A-0 * * A-0 * A-60 A-0 A-0 *
Accommodation spaces
(3) A-60 A-0 * A-0 * A-60 A-0 A-0 *
Stairways
(4) A-0 A-0 A-0 * A-0 A-60 A-0 A-0 *
Service spaces (low risk)
(5) A-15 A-0 A-0 A-0 * A-60 A-0 A-0 *
Machinery spaces of Category A
(6) A-60 A-60 A-60 A-60 A-60 * A-60f A-60 *
Other machinery spaces
(7) A-15 A-0 A-0 A-0 A-0 A-0 * A-0 *
Service spaces (high risk)
(8) A-60 A-30
A-0d A-30
A-0d A-30
A-0d A-0 A-60 A-0 A-0 *
Open decks
(9) * * * * * * * * -

Notes: (to be applied to both Tables 3 and 4, as appropriate)

a. For clarification on which applies, see Sections 14.3.3.4 above and 14.3.3.7 below.

b. Where spaces are of the same numerical Category and subscript b appears, a bulkhead or deck of the rating shown in the Tables is only required when the adjacent spaces are for a different purpose, e.g., in Category (9), a galley next to a galley does not require a bulkhead but a galley next to a paint room requires an “A-0” bulkhead.

c. Bulkheads separating the wheelhouse and chartroom from each other may be “B-0” rating.

d. See paragraphs 14.3.3.5.2(c) and 14.3.3.5.2(d) above.

e. For the application of paragraph 14.3.3.3.1 above, “B-0” and “C”, where appearing in Table 3, should be read as “A-0.”

f. Fire insulation need not be fitted if the machinery space in Category (7), in the opinion of the Appointed Representative, has little or no fire risk.

* Where an asterisk appears in the Tables, the division is required to be of steel or other equivalent material but is not required to be of “A” class standard.

For the application of paragraph 14.3.3.3.1 above an asterisk, where appearing in Table 4, except for Category (9), should be read as “A-0.”

.3 Continuous “B” class ceilings or linings, in association with the relevant decks or bulkheads, may be accepted as contributing wholly or in part to the required insulation and integrity of a division.

.4 External boundaries, which are required to be of steel or other equivalent material, may be pierced for the fitting of windows and side scuttles provided that there is no requirement for such boundaries to have “A” class integrity elsewhere in this section. Similarly, in such boundaries, which are not required to have “A” class integrity, doors may be of combustible materials, substantially constructed.

14.3.3.6 Means of escape

.1 Stairways and ladders should be arranged to provide ready means of escape to the lifeboat and life raft embarkation deck from all accommodation and service spaces other than machinery spaces. In particular, the following provisions should be complied with:

(a) Below the lowest open deck two (2) means of escape, at least one (1) of which should be independent of watertight doors, should be provided from each watertight compartment, main vertical zone or similarly restricted group of spaces. Exceptionally one (1) of the means of escape may be dispensed with, due regard being paid to the nature and location of spaces and to the number of persons who might normally be accommodated or employed there.

(b) Above the lowest open deck there should be at least two (2) means of escape from each main vertical zone or similarly restricted group of spaces.

(c) Within each main vertical zone there should be at least one (1) readily accessible enclosed stairway providing continuous fire shelter, where practicable at all levels up to the appropriate lifeboat and life raft embarkation decks or the highest level served by the stairway, whichever level is the highest. The width, number and continuity of the stairways should be satisfactory for the number of persons likely to use them.

(d) Access from the stairway enclosures to the lifeboat and life raft embarkation areas should avoid high fire risk areas.

(e) Stairways serving only a space and a balcony in that space should not be considered as forming one (1) of the required means of escape.

(f) If a radio room or wheelhouse has no direct access to the open deck, two (2) means of escape should be provided, one (1) of which may be a window of sufficient size or another means.

(g) Where a second means of escape is via a sealed window, then breakable glass, not polycarbonate or laminated glass, which can be readily broken with a conveniently located crash hammer, may be accepted. Such windows should be suitably placed as to permit escape through it.

.2 Two (2) means of escape should be provided from each machinery space. In particular, the following provisions should be complied with:

(a) The two (2) means of escape should consist of either:

(1) two (2) sets of steel ladders as widely separated as possible, leading to doors in the upper part of the space similarly separated and from which access is provided to the appropriate lifeboat and life raft embarkation decks. One (1) of these ladders should provide continuous fire shelter from the lower part of the space to a safe position outside the space; or

(2) one (1) steel ladder leading to a door in the upper part of the space from which access is provided to the embarkation deck and additionally, in the lower part of the space and in a position well separated from the ladder referred to, a steel door capable of being operated from each side and which provides access to a safe escape route from the lower part of the space to the embarkation deck.

(b) One (1) of the means of escape may be dispensed with, due regard being paid to the width and disposition of the upper part of the space.

(c) Two (2) means of escape should be provided from a machinery control room located within a machinery space, at least one (1) of which should provide continuous fire shelter to a safe position outside the machinery space.

.3 In no case should lifts be considered as forming one of the required means of escape.

14.3.3.7 Protection of stairways and lifts in accommodation and service spaces

.1 A stairway should be of steel frame construction except where the Appointed Representative sanctions the use of other equivalent material, and should be within enclosures formed of “A” class divisions, with positive means of closure at all openings, except that:

(a) a stairway which penetrates a single deck only may be protected at one (1) level only by at least “B” class divisions and self-closing door(s); and

(b) stairways may be fitted in the open in a public space, provided they lie wholly within such public space.

.2 A stairway enclosure should have direct communication with the corridors and be of sufficient area to prevent congestion, having in view the number of persons likely to use them in an emergency. In so far as is practicable, stairway enclosures should not give direct access to cabins, service lockers, or other enclosed spaces containing combustibles in which a fire is likely to originate.

.3 A lift trunk should be so fitted to prevent the passage of flame from one (1) ’tween-deck to another and should be provided with means of closing to permit the control of draft and smoke.

14.3.3.8 Openings in “A” class divisions

.1 Except for hatches between store and baggage spaces, and between such spaces and the weather decks, all openings should be provided with permanently attached means of closing which should be at least as effective for resisting fires as the divisions in which they are fitted.

.2 The construction of all doors and door frames in “A” class divisions, with the means of securing them when closed, should provide resistance to fire as well as the passage of smoke and flame, as far as practicable, equivalent to that of the bulkheads in which the doors are situated. Such doors and door frames should be constructed of steel or other equivalent material. Watertight doors need not be insulated.

.3 It should be possible for each door to be opened and closed from each side of the bulkhead by one (1) person only.

.4 Fire doors in main vertical zone bulkheads and stairway enclosures, other than power-operated watertight doors and those which are normally locked, should be of the self-closing type capable of closing against an inclination of 3.5 opposing closure. The speed of door closure should, if necessary, be controlled to prevent undue danger to persons. All such doors, except those that are normally closed, should all be capable of release from a control station, either simultaneously or in groups, and also individually from a position at the door. The release mechanism should be so designed that the door will automatically close in the event of disruption of the control system; however, approved power-operated watertight doors will be considered acceptable for this purpose. Hold-back hooks not subject to control station release should not be permitted. When double swing doors are permitted, they should have a latch arrangement that is automatically engaged by the operation of the door release system.

.5 When a space is protected by an automatic sprinkler system complying with the provisions of paragraph 14.3.3.13.1(b) or fitted with a continuous “B” class ceiling, openings in decks not forming steps in main vertical zones nor bounding horizontal zones should be closed reasonably tight and such decks should meet the “A” class integrity requirements in so far as is reasonable and practicable.

14.3.3.9 Openings in “B” class divisions
.1 Doors and door frames in “B” class divisions and means of securing them should provide a method of closure which should have resistance to fire as far as practicable equivalent to that of the divisions except that a ventilation opening may be permitted in the lower portion of such doors. When such an opening is in or under a door the total net area of the opening(s) should not exceed 0.05m2. When such an opening is cut in a door it should be fitted with a grill made of non-combustible material. Doors should be non-combustible or of substantial construction.

.2 When a sprinkler system complying with the provisions of paragraph 14.3.3.13.1(b) below is fitted:

(a) openings in decks not forming steps in main vertical zones nor bounding horizontal zones should be closed reasonably tight and such decks should meet the “B” class integrity requirements in so far as is reasonable and practicable in the opinion of the Appointed Representative; and

(b) openings in corridor bulkheads of “B” class materials should be protected in accordance with the provisions of Section 14.3.3.4 above.

14.3.3.10 Windows and side scuttles (Also see Sections 5.4 and 5.5)

.1 All windows and side scuttles in bulkheads within accommodation, service spaces and control stations should be so constructed to preserve the integrity requirements of the type of bulkheads in which they are fitted.

.2 Notwithstanding the requirements of Tables 3 and 4 above all windows and side scuttles in bulkheads separating accommodation and service spaces and control stations from weather should be constructed with frames of steel or other suitable material. A metal glazing bead or angle should retain the glass.

14.3.3.11 Restricted use of combustible materials

.1 Except in baggage rooms, or refrigerated compartments of service spaces, all linings, grounds, draught stops, ceilings and insulations should be of non-combustible materials.

.2 Vapor barriers and adhesives used in conjunction with insulation, as well as insulation of pipe fittings, for cold service systems need not be non-combustible, but they should be kept to the minimum quantity practicable and their exposed surfaces should be low flame spread.

.3 The following surfaces should be low flame spread:

(a) exposed surfaces in corridors and stairway enclosures, and of bulkheads, wall and ceiling linings in all service spaces and control stations;

(b) concealed or inaccessible spaces in accommodation, service spaces and control stations; and

(c) exposed surfaces of bulkheads, wall and ceiling linings in accommodation spaces not protected by a system complying with paragraph 14.3.3.13.1(b) or 14.3.3.13.1(c) below.

.4 The total volume of combustible facings, moldings, decorations and veneers in any accommodation and service space not protected by a system complying with paragraph 14.3.3.13.1(b) or 14.3.3.13.1(c), should not exceed a volume equivalent to 2.5mm veneer on the combined area of the walls and ceilings.

.5 Veneers used on surfaces and linings covered by the requirements of paragraph 14.3.3.11(c) above should have a calorific value not, exceeding 45MJ/m2 of the area for the thickness used.

.6 Furniture in the corridors and escape routes should be of a type and quantity not likely to obstruct access.
.7 Primary deck coverings, if applied within accommodation and service spaces and control stations, should be of material that will not readily ignite.

.8 Upholstery composites (fabric in association with any backing or padding material) used throughout the yacht should satisfy fire test procedures of IMO Resolution MSC.61(67), Annex 1, Part 8, or an equivalent standard; and

(a) Organic foams used in upholstered furniture and mattresses should be of the combustion modified type satisfying the fire test procedures of IMO Resolution MSC.61(67), Annex 1, Part 9, or an equivalent standard; and

(b) Suspended textile materials such as curtains and drapes should satisfy the fire test procedures of IMO Resolution MSC.61(67), Annex 1, Part 7, or be of equivalent standard.

14.3.3.12 Details of construction

.1 In accommodation and service spaces, control stations, corridors and stairways:

(a) air spaces enclosed behind ceilings, paneling or linings should be suitably divided by close-fitting draught stops not more than 7m apart; and

(b) in the vertical direction, enclosed air spaces, including those behind linings of stairways, trunks, etc. should be closed at each deck.

.2 Without impairing the efficiency of the fire protection, the construction of ceilings and bulkheads should allow a fire patrol to detect any smoke originating in concealed and inaccessible places, except where there is no risk of fire originating in such places.

.3 When gaseous fuel is used for domestic purposes, the arrangements for the storage, distribution and utilization of the fuel should be such that, having regard to the hazards of fire and explosion which the use of such fuel may entail, the safety of the yacht and the persons onboard are preserved.

.4 In particular, open flame gas appliances provided for cooking, heating or any other purposes, should comply with the requirements of ISO 10239 or equivalent and, the installation of open flame gas appliances should comply with the appropriate provisions of Annex 3.

14.3.3.13 Fixed fire detection and fire alarm systems and automatic sprinkler, fire detection and fire alarm systems

.1 Each separate zone in all accommodation and service spaces, except spaces which afford no substantial fire risk such as void spaces, sanitary spaces, etc., and, having regard for paragraph 14.3.3.11.4 above, should be provided throughout with either:

(a) a fixed fire detection and fire alarm system of an approved type and complying with the requirements of SOLAS Regulation II-2/12, installed and arranged to detect the presence of fire in such spaces; or

(b) an automatic sprinkler, fire detection and fire alarm system of an approved type and complying with the requirements of SOLAS Regulation II-2/12 and installed and arranged to protect such spaces. Water-mist fire extinguishing systems complying with the guidelines provided in MSC/Circ.668 and 728 may be approved for use by the Administration in machinery spaces. In addition, a fixed fire detection and fire alarm system of an approved type complying with the requirements of SOLAS Regulation II-2/13 should be installed and arranged to provide smoke detection in corridors, stairways and escape routes within accommodation spaces; or

(c) a manual dry pipe sprinkler system of an approved type either complying with the requirements of IMO Resolution MSC.44(65) or, to the satisfaction of the Appointed Representative, an equivalent standard, which provides increased security against damage caused by accidental discharge from sprinklers. The system should be installed and arranged to protect such spaces. In addition, a fixed addressable fire detection and alarm system of an approved type complying with the requirements of SOLAS Chapter II-2 Regulation 13 should be installed and arranged to detect the presence of fire in such spaces.

14.3.3.14 Fire detection and alarms

.1 Manually operated call points complying with the requirements of SOLAS Regulation II-2/13 should be installed.

.2 At all times, yachts when at sea and in port (except when out of service) should be manned and/or equipped to ensure that any initial fire alarm is immediately received by a responsible member of the crew.

15.0 FIRE APPLIANCES

15.1 Yachts of less than 500 GT

15.1.1 General Requirements

Fire appliances of an approved type should be provided at least to the extent listed in Table 5 below and, in any case, to the satisfaction of the Appointed Representative and the specific requirements of Section 15.1.2 below.

Fire appliances provided in addition to those required by this section should be of an approved type.

The location, installation, testing and maintenance of all equipment should be to the satisfaction of the Appointed Representative.

Concealed fire appliances should be clearly marked; however the marking need not comply with IMO signs, but be suitable, taking into account décor.

15.1.2 Specific Requirements

15.1.2.1 Provision of water jet

At least one (1) jet of water should be able to reach any part of the yacht normally accessible to passengers or crew while the yacht is being navigated and, any storeroom and any part of a storage compartment when empty.

15.1.2.2 Fire pumps

.1 The power driven fire pump should have a capacity of -

2.5 x (1+0.066 x (L(B+D))0.5)2 m3/hour

where: L is the load line length;
B is the greatest molded breadth; and
D is the molded depth measured to the bulkhead deck at amidships.

When discharging at full capacity through two (2) adjacent fire hydrants, the pump should be capable of maintaining a water pressure of 0.2N/mm2 at any hydrant, provided the fire hose can be effectively controlled at this pressure.

.2 The second fire pump may be:

(a) a hand pump, sufficient to produce a throw of at least six (6) meters through a fire hose with a 10mm diameter nozzle and which can be directed on any part of the yacht; or

(b) a power driven pump, at least 80% of that required by 15.1.2.2.1 and be fitted with an input to the fire main; or

(c) a portable fire pump with a throw-overboard weighted sea suction is acceptable on existing yachts. For new yachts, a permanent sea connection external to the machinery space is recommended. The pump should be placed on deck and be capable of operating two (2) hoses. The hoses should be capable of reaching all points of the yacht. The junction should be long enough to allow for worst list conditions. The unit should be easily movable by the crew to all quarters of the yacht.

(d) Each centrifugal pump should be provided with a check valve in the connection to the firemain.

Table 5
Fire Appliances – Yachts of
Less than 500 GT (see 15.1.1)
1 PROVISION OF WATER JET – sufficient to reach any part of yacht 1
2 POWER DRIVEN FIRE PUMP – engine or independent drive 1
3 ADDITIONAL HAND OR INDEPENDENT POWER DRIVEN FIRE PUMP AND ITS SEA CONNECTION – not located in the same space as item 2 or a machinery space containing internal combustion type machinery 1
4 FIRE MAIN & HYDRANTS – to achieve item 1 with a single length of hose Sufficient
5 HOSES – with jet/spray nozzles each fitted with a shut-off facility 3
6 FIRE EXTINGUISHERS – portable, for use in accommodation and service spaces 3
7 FIRE EXTINGUISHERS – for a machinery space containing internal combustion type machinery – the options are:
(a) a fixed fire extinguishing system complying with SOLAS Regulation 11-2/Part A; and
(b) (i) one (1) portable extinguisher for oil fires for each 74.6kW power; or 7 (max)
(ii) two (2) portable extinguishers for oil fires together with either: 2 + 1
- one (1) foam extinguishers with total of 451 capacity; or
- one (1) CO2 extinguishers with total of 16kg capacity
8 FIREMANS OUTFIT – to include one (1) breathing apparatus 1
9 FIRE BLANKET – in galley 1

15.1.2.3 Fire main and hydrants

.1 A fire main, water service pipes and fire hydrants should be fitted.

.2 The fire main and water service pipe connections to the hydrants should be sized for the maximum discharge rate of the pump(s) connected to the main.

.3 The fire main, water service pipes and fire hydrants should be constructed such that they will:
(a) not be rendered ineffective by heat;

(b) not corrode; and

(c) be protected against freezing.

.4 When a fire main is supplied by two (2) pumps, one (1) in the machinery space and one (1) elsewhere, provision should be made for isolation of the fire main within the machinery space and for the second pump to supply the fire main and hydrants external to the machinery space.

The isolation valve(s) should be manually operated valves fitted outside the machinery space in a position easily accessible in the event of a fire.

.5 The fire main should have no connections other than those necessary for fire fighting or washing down.

.6 Fire hydrants should be located for easy attachment of fire hoses, protected from damage and distributed so that the fire hoses provided can reach any part of the yacht.

.7 Fire hydrants should be fitted with valves that allow a fire hose to be isolated and removed when a fire pump is working.

15.1.2.4 Fire hoses

.1 Fire hoses should not exceed 18 meters in length and, generally, the diameter of a lined hose for use with a powered pump should not be less than 45mm. Smaller diameter hoses may be accepted provided that two (2) such hoses of average length are capable of discharging the pump volumetric capacity in paragraph 15.1.2.2.1 above with adequate jets.

.2 Fire hoses and associated tools and fittings should be kept in readily accessible and known locations close to the hydrants or connections on which they will be used. Hoses supplied from a powered pump should have jet/spray nozzles (incorporating a shut-off facility) of diameter 19mm, 16mm or 12mm depending on fire fighting purposes. (For accommodation and service spaces, the diameter of nozzles need not exceed 12mm.)

.3 Hydrants or connections in interior locations on the yacht should have hoses connected at all times. For use within accommodation and service spaces proposals to provide smaller diameter of hoses and jet/spray nozzles will be considered.

.4 The number of fire hoses and nozzles provided should correspond to the functional fire safety requirements, but be at least three (3).

15.1.2.5 Portable fire extinguishers for use in accommodation and service spaces

.1 The number, location, fire extinguishing medium type and capacity should be selected according to the perceived fire risk but at least three (3) portable fire extinguishers should be provided. As far as practicable, the fire extinguishers provided should have a uniform method of operation.

.2 Portable fire extinguishers of carbon dioxide type should not be located or provided for use in accommodation spaces.

.3 Except for portable extinguishers provided in connection with a specific hazard within a space when it is manned (such as a galley), portable extinguishers generally should be located external to but adjacent to the entrance of the space(s) in which they will be used. Extinguishers should be stowed in readily accessible and marked locations.

.4 Spare charges should be provided onboard for at least 50% of each type and capacity of portable fire extinguisher onboard. When an extinguisher is not of a type that is rechargeable when the yacht is at sea, an additional portable fire extinguisher of the same type (or its equivalent) should be provided.

15.1.2.6 Fire extinguishing in machinery spaces

.1 In a machinery space containing internal combustion type machinery fire appliances should be provided at least to the extent listed in item 7 of Table 5 above – Fire Appliances.

.2 In a machinery space containing an oil fuel settling tank or oil fuel unit, a fixed fire extinguishing system complying with SOLAS Ch II-2/Part A should be installed.

.3 Portable fire extinguishers should be installed and the number, location, fire extinguishing medium type and capacity should be selected according to the perceived fire risk in the space. Spare charges or spare extinguishers should be provided per paragraph 15.1.2.5.4 above. In any case, at least two (2) portable fire extinguishers for extinguishing oil fires should be fitted in any space containing any part of an oil fuel installation.

15.2 Yachts 500 GT and over

Concealed fire appliances should be clearly marked; however the marking need not comply with IMO signs, but be suitable, taking into account the décor.

15.2.1 Existing Yachts

An existing yacht should comply with the requirements for a new yacht so far as it is reasonable and practicable to do so but, in any case, as a minimum it should comply with the requirements for a yacht of less than 500 GT.

15.2.2 New Yachts

A new yacht should comply with SOLAS Chapter II-2/Part A as appropriate to the yacht and its equipment. For the purpose of the SOLAS regulations the standards for a cargo ship apply.

In no case should the standards applied be less than those applied to a yacht of less than 500 GT.

16.0 RADIO

16.1 General

A Marshall Islands Ship Radio Station License is required on all yachts with a radio station on board. An appropriately certified radio operator must also be on board. A SOLAS Chapter IV Convention Safety Radio Certificate is required for all commercial yachts of 300 gross tons and over which will entail GMDSS compliance and SOLAS Chapter V AIS and LRIT compliance. All yachts regardless of size should comply with the requirements of this Section.

16.1.1 Global Marine Distress and Safety System (GMDSS)

.1 Functions

Each yacht should carry sufficient radio equipment to perform the following distress and safety communications functions throughout its intended voyage:

.1 transmitting ship to shore distress alerts by at least two (2) separate and independent means, each using a different radiocommunication service;

.2 receiving shore-to-ship distress alerts;

.3 transmitting and receiving ship-to-ship distress alerts;

.4 transmitting and receiving search and rescue coordinating communications;

.5 transmitting and receiving on-scene communications;

.6 transmitting and receiving signals for locating by radar;

.7 transmitting and receiving maritime safety information; and

.8 transmitting and receiving bridge-to-bridge communications.

16.1.2 Automatic Identification System (AIS)

All vessels of 300 GT and over shall be fitted with an approved automatic identification system in accordance with SOLAS Chapter V, Reg. 19.2.4. Please refer to Marshall Islands Marine Notice 2-011-17.

16.1.3 Long-Range Identification and Tracking (LRIT)

All vessels of 300 GT and over shall be capable of complying with the requirements of LRIT in accordance with SOLAS Chapter V, Reg. 19.1. Please refer to Marshall Islands Marine Notice 2-011-25.

16.2 Radio Station Equipment

16.2.1 Installations

.1 Table 6 illustrates the radio installations to be carried to fulfill the functional requirements sailing at different distances from a safe haven.

Table 6
Radio Equipment
Category 2 Category 1 Category 0
VHF Radiotelephone with Digital Selective Calling (DSC) One One One
MF/HF Radiotelephone with Digital Selective Calling (DSC) One1 One1 One1
INMARSAT Ship Earth Station None One1 One1
NAVTEX2 receiver None One One

Notes:

1. An INMARSAT ship earth station or an MF/HF radiotelephone with DSC may be fitted for operations over 60 miles from a safe haven. For yachts below 300 GT, a fixed and registered satellite telephone may be substituted for an INMARSAT-C.

2. If the yacht is sailing in an area where an international NAVTEX service is not provided then the NAVTEX receiver should be substituted by an INMARSAT enhanced group calling system.

.2 Example

As an illustration, the minimum equipment to be installed on a yacht engaged on world-wide operations south of 70 North and north of 70 South would be:

one (1) VHF radiotelephone with DSC;
one (1) INMARSAT-C ship earth station; and
one (1) NAVTEX receiver.

Note also the requirement for the carriage of two-way radiotelephone sets, EPIRBs and SARTs given in Section 13, Table 2.

16.2.2 Operational performance

All radiocommunications equipment should be of a type that is approved by the relevant authority.

16.2.3 Location, protection and markings

The radio station should:

.1 be so located to ensure the greatest possible degree of safety and operational availability;

.2 be protected against harmful effects of water, extremes of temperature and other adverse environmental conditions; and

.3 be clearly marked with the call sign, the yacht station identity and any other codes applicable to the use of the radio station installation.

16.2.4 Sources of energy

.1 There should be available at all times, while the yacht is at sea, a supply of electrical energy sufficient to operate the radio installations and to charge any batteries used as part of a reserve source or sources of energy for the radio installations.

.2 A reserve source of energy, independent of the propelling power of the yacht and its electrical system, should be provided for the purpose of conducting distress and safety radiocommunications for a minimum of one (1) hour in the event of failure of the yacht’s main and, if provided, emergency sources of electrical power.

.3 When a reserve source of energy consists of a rechargeable accumulator battery, a means of automatically charging such batteries should be provided which is capable of recharging them to minimum capacity requirements within 10 hours.

.4 The siting and installation of accumulator batteries should ensure the highest degree of service and safety.

16.3 Watches

A yacht, while at sea, should maintain a continuous watch:

.1 where practicable, on VHF Channel 16;

.2 where practicable, on VHF Channel 13;

.3 on VHF Digital Selective Calling (DSC) channel 70;

.4 on the distress and safety DSC frequency 2187.5kHz;

.5 for satellite shore-to-ship distress alerts if fitted with a radio facility for reception of maritime safety information by the INMARSAT enhanced group calling system; and

.6 for broadcasts of maritime safety information on the appropriate frequency or frequencies on which such information is broadcast for the area in which the yacht is navigating; normally using the International NAVTEX service or INMARSAT’s enhanced group calling facility.

16.4 Radio personnel

A yacht should carry at least one (1) person qualified for distress and safety radiocommunication purposes, who should hold a certificate of competence acceptable to the Maritime Administrator. Refer to the Marshall Islands publication MI-118 “Requirements for Merchant Marine Personnel Certification.”

17.0 NAVIGATION LIGHTS, SHAPES and SOUND SIGNALS

.1 Every yacht must comply with the requirements of the International Regulations For Preventing Collisions At Sea, 1972, as amended (COLREGS ‘72).

.2 Yacht designers and builders must ensure that the yacht’s navigation lights and associated fittings are correctly installed on new yachts and on yachts undergoing extensive alterations. It is also the responsibility of an owner or managing agent to ensure that a yacht being taken over, whether new or second-hand, is also in compliance with COLREGS ’72.

.3 The Maritime Administrator may, if deemed necessary, require the submission of detailed plans to the Appointed Representative showing the positioning and arrangements of navigation lights for examination prior to registration.

18.0 NAVIGATIONAL EQUIPMENT and WHEELHOUSE VISIBILITY

18.1 Navigational Equipment

18.1.1 A yacht should be fitted with an efficient magnetic compass complying with the following requirements, as appropriate:

.1 On a steel yacht it should be possible to correct the compass for coefficients B, C and D.

.2 The magnetic compass or a repeater should be so positioned as to be clearly readable by the helmsman at the main steering position. It should also be provided with an electric light, the electric power supply to be twin wire type.

.3 Means should be provided for taking bearings as near as practicable over an arc of the horizon of 360º. This requirement may be met by the fitting of a pelorus or, on a yacht other than a steel yacht, a hand held compass.

18.1.2 A yacht should be fitted with an echo sounder.

18.1.3 A yacht should be provided with, the following additional equipment:

.1 an electronic navigational positioning system appropriate to the area of operation;

.2 a gyro compass or spare magnetic compass bowl;

.3 a rudder angle indicator; and

.4 a 9 GHz radar.

18.2 Wheelhouse Visibility

.1 The normal conning position should permit a good all round view of the horizon. The sea surface should not be obscured for more than two (2) yacht lengths forward of the bow. Refer to SOLAS Chapter V, Regulation 22.

.2 Windows to the navigating position should not be of either polarized or tinted glass (see paragraph 5.5.5). Portable tinted screens may be provided for selected windows.

19.0 MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT

19.1 Publications

Every yacht should comply with Marshall Islands Marine Notice 1-000-3 which provides guidance in a concise form of the IMO requirements on the carriage of publications. The specific requirements for commercial yachts over 24 meters are as per Table 7, below.

Table 7.

NAVIGATION PUBLICATIONS FOR A COMMERCIAL YACHT ABOVE 24 METERS

COLREGS Convention on the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea
IAMSAR International Aeronautical and Maritime Search and Rescue Manual Vol. III
ICLL International Convention on Load Lines
ICS International Code of Signals
ISM International Management Code for the Safe Operation of Ships
ISPS International Ship and Port Facility Security Code
MARPOL International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships
MI-103 Marshall Islands’ Commercial Yacht Code
MI-300 Marshall Islands’ Combined Publication Folder
NAUTAL Nautical Almanac
NAUTCH-E Nautical Charts – Electronic
NAUTCH-P Nautical Charts – Paper
NAUTPUB-E Nautical Publications (Sailing Directions, Light List, Tide Tables, etc.)
NAUTPUB-P Nautical Publications (Sailing Directions, Light List, Tide Tables, etc.)
NTVRP Nontank Vessel Response Plan (when in US waters only)
SOLAS International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea
SOPEP Shipboard Oil Pollution Emergency Plan
STCW International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarer
STMAN Safety and Training Manual (aka SOLAS Training Manual)

Publication Yachts up to 299 GT Yachts from 300 GT up to 399 GT Yachts from 400 GT up to 499 GT Yachts greater than 500 GT
COLREGS ● ● ● ●
IAMSAR ● ● ● ●
ICLL ● ● ● ●
ICS ● ● ● ●
ISM ●
ISPS Recommended Recommended ●
MARPOL* ● ●
MI-103 ● ● ●
MI-300 ●
NAUTAL ● ● ● ●
NAUTCH-E ● ● ● ●
NAUTCH-P ● ● ● ●
NAUTPUB-E ● ● ● ●
NAUTPUB-P ● ● ● ●
NTVRP ● ●
SOLAS ● ● ●
SOPEP ● ●
STCW ● ● ● ●
STMAN ● ● ● ●

* Yachts certified to carry more than 15 people, regardless of tonnage, shall carry a copy of MARPOL.

19.2 Signaling Lamp

Every yacht should carry an approved signaling lamp and/or handheld searchlight.

19.3 Instruments

Every yacht should carry a barometer. Every sailing yacht should carry an anemometer and an inclinometer.

19.4 Searchlight

Every yacht should carry an efficient fixed or portable searchlight suitable for man-overboard search and rescue operations. This may be the approved signaling lamp required by Section 19.2.

20.0 ANCHORS, CABLES and TOWING ARRANGEMENTS

20.1 Equipment

.1 Yachts will be considered to have adequate equipment if fitted out in accordance with certification standards set by any of the Classification Societies listed in Section 28.1.

.2 Yachts not built in accordance with paragraph 20.1.1 may be specially considered by the Administration provided full information is submitted to an Appointed Representative for review and recommendation of approval.

20.2 Sailing Yachts

.1 The sizing of anchors and cables for sailing yachts should take into account the additional windage effect of the masts and rigging.

.2 For square rigged sailing yachts, experience based guidance on approximate increase in anchor mass and cable strength required is:

(a) for yachts up to 50 meters in load line length, typically 50% above the requirements for a typical motor yacht having the same total longitudinal profile area of hull and superstructure as the sailing yacht under consideration; and

(b) for yachts 100 meters in load line length and over, typically 30% above the requirements for a typical motor yacht having the same total longitudinal profile area of hull and superstructure as the sailing yacht under consideration.

For a square rigged sailing yacht of between 50 and 100 meters in load line length the increase should be obtained by linear interpolation.

20.3 Towing Arrangements
Accessible efficient strong securing points should be provided for the attachment of towlines for the yacht to tow and be towed.

21.0 ACCOMMODATIONS

21.1 General

An adequate standard of accommodation should be provided to ensure the comfort, recreation, health and safety of all persons on board.

Attention is drawn to the achievement of appropriate standards for means of access and escape, lighting, heating, food preparation and storage, safety of movement about the yacht, ventilation and water services.

Generally, accommodation standards for the crew should be at least equivalent to the standards set by the International Labor Organization conventions.

The following standards are described by general principles that need to be expanded to meet the requirements that relate to the use and areas of operation of a particular yacht.

21.2 Access/Escape Arrangements

See Sections 14.2.4 and 14.3.3.6.

21.3 Lighting

An electric lighting system should be installed which is capable of supplying adequate light to all enclosed accommodation and working spaces. The system should be designed and installed in accordance with Section 8.0.

21.4 Heating

As considered appropriate, an adequate heating installation should be provided.

21.5 Food Preparation and Storage

.1 The galley should be provided with a cooking stove fitted with fiddle bars and a sink, and have adequate working surface for the preparation of food.

.2 The galley floor should be provided with a non-slip surface and provide a good foothold.

.3 When a cooking appliance is gimbaled, a crash bar or other means to prevent personal injury should protect it. Means should be provided to lock the gimbaling mechanism.

.4 Means should be provided to allow the cook to be secured in position, with both hands free for working, when the yacht motions threaten safe working.

.5 Secure and hygienic storage for food should be provided.

21.6 Hand Holds and Grab Rails

There should be sufficient hand holds and grab rails within the accommodation to allow safe movement around the accommodation at all times.

21.7 Ventilation

.1 Effective means of ventilation should be provided to all enclosed spaces that are entered by personnel.

.2 Mechanical ventilation should be provided to all accommodation spaces on yachts that are intended to make long international voyages or operate in tropical waters.

.3 As a minimum, mechanical ventilation should be capable of providing six (6) changes of air per hour, when all access and other openings (other than ventilation intakes) to the spaces are closed.

21.8 Water Services

.1 An adequate supply of fresh filtered drinking water should be provided and piped to convenient positions throughout the accommodation spaces, especially the galley.

.2 In addition, an emergency reserve supply of drinking water should be carried, sufficient to provide at least two (2) liters per person.

.3 If a yacht cannot produce its own water supply, sterilization by UV is not acceptable on its own, but may be accepted as a secondary means.

21.9 Sleeping Accommodation

A bed (bunk or cot) should be provided for every person on board. Where considered appropriate, means for preventing the occupants from falling out should be provided.

21.10 Toilet Facilities

.1 Adequate sanitary toilet facilities should be provided on board. The facilities should be at least one (1) water closet, one (1) wash hand basin and one (1) shower for every four (4) persons or part thereof.

.2 In yachts where a sanitary system, including a holding tank, are provided, care should be taken to ensure that there is no possibility of fumes from the tank finding their way back to a toilet, should the water seal at the toilet be broken.

21.11 Stowage Facilities for Personal Effects

Adequate stowage facilities for clothing and personal effects should be provided for every person on board.

21.12 Securing of Heavy Equipment

.1 All heavy items of equipment such as ballast, batteries, cooking stove, etc, should be securely fastened in place.

.2 All stowage lockers containing heavy items should have lids or doors that are capable of being securely fastened.

21.13 Elevators (Lifts), Escalators and Other Accommodation Lifting Devices

.1 For new yachts, lifting devices must be designed and constructed to recognized international standards.

.2 Before a lifting device is put into service, it must be tested and examined by a competent person and a certificate issued to the yacht.

.3 For all commercial yachts, regular in service examination must be carried out by a competent person and this should be verified by the Appointed Representative as part of the annual safety inspection, to ensure continuing compliance.

22.0 PROTECTION OF PERSONNEL

22.1 Deckhouses and Superstructures

The structural strength of any deckhouse or superstructure should comply with the requirements of one of the Classification Societies listed in Section 28.1, as appropriate to the yacht and its areas of operation.

22.2 Bulwarks and Guard Rails

.1 Wherever reasonable and practicable, yachts should comply with ILLC requirements and the interpretation used by any of the Classification Societies listed in Section 28.1.

.2 When it can be justified that such standards cannot be complied with, compliance with the following guidelines will be considered by an Appointed Representative:

(a) Where the function of the yacht is not impeded and there are frequently people on the deck, bulwarks or three (3) courses of rail or taut wires should be fitted around the deck at a height of not less than 1000mm above the deck. They should be supported at intervals not exceeding 2.2 meters. Intermediate courses of rails or wires should be evenly spaced.

(b) Where the function of the yacht would be impeded by the provision of bulwarks and/or guard rails complying with Section 22.2, alternative proposals detailed to provide equivalent safety for persons on deck should be submitted to the Appointed Representative of the Administration for review and approval.

22.3 Safe Work Aloft and on the Bowsprit of Sailing Yachts

.1 When access to the rig is an operational necessity, provision should be made to enable people to work safely aloft and out on the bowsprit, to the satisfaction of the Appointed Representative.

.2 The arrangements provided should be based on established safe working practices for the type of yacht. The arrangements may include but not be limited to:

(a) Safety nets below the bowsprit.

(b) Safety grab-rails in wood (or jackstays in metal) fixed along the bowsprit to act as handholds and safety points for safety harnesses.

(c) Mandatory use of safety harnesses aloft and for work on the bowsprit.

(d) Sufficient footropes and horses in wire (or rope) permanently rigged to enable seamen to stand on them while working out on the yards or on the bowsprit.

(e) Safety jackstays (in metal) fixed along the top of the yards, to provide handholds and act as strong points for safety harnesses.

(f) Means of safely climbing aloft, such as:

(1) fixed metal steps or ladders attached to the mast; or

(2) traditional ratlines (rope) or, rattling bars (wood/steel), fixed across the shrouds to form a permanent ladder.

22.4 Recovery of Persons from the Sea
.1 Means should be provided for the recovery of a person from the sea to the yacht. The means should allow that the person is unconscious or unable to assist in the rescue. This may be satisfied by an inflatable boat or rescue boat provided with a suitable davit should it not be possible for the yacht itself to be used to recover persons from the sea.

.2 The means of recovery by whatever intended means should be demonstrated to the satisfaction of an Appointed Representative.

.3 If an over side boarding ladder or scrambling net is provided to assist in the recovery of an unconscious person from the water, the ladder or net should extend from the weather deck to at least 600mm below the lowest operational waterline.

22.5 Personal Clothing

It should be the responsibility of the owner or managing agent to ensure that the following requirements and recommendations for items of personal clothing are maintained:

.1 All persons on board should have suitable protective clothing and equipment appropriate to the prevailing air and sea temperatures and weather conditions.

.2 It is strongly recommended that all persons on board wear footwear provided with non-slip soles, particularly on the open deck.

22.6 Noise

.1 Attention is drawn to the IMO Code on Noise Levels on Board Ships – Resolution A.468(XII) (the Noise Code).

.2 New yachts covered by this Code should meet the recommendations of the Noise Code so far as reasonable and practicable.

.3 Existing yachts should be considered with particular regard to the recommendations of the Noise Code for protection of the crew from noise levels that may give rise to noise-induced hearing loss.

.4 The Administration recognizes that the scope for strict application of recommended noise levels on small yachts can be limited and will consider other means of protecting the seafarer from the risk of noise-induced hearing loss under conditions where, at the present time, it is not technically feasible to limit the noise to a level which is not potentially harmful.

.5 For safe navigation, so that sound signals and VHF communications can be heard, it is recommended that a noise level of 65dB(A) at the navigating position should not be exceeded.

.6 For machinery spaces, workshops and stores, which are manned either continuously or for lengthy periods, the recommended limits are 90dB(A) (see paragraph 22.6.7 below) for machinery spaces and 85dB(A) for workshops and stores. For any space which is required to be manned and in which the noise level exceeds 90dB(A), consideration should be given to providing a designated refuge area from noise.

(a) For machinery spaces, which are not intended to be continuously manned or are attended for short periods only, the recommended limit is 110dB(A) (see paragraph 22.6.7 below).

(b) The limits have been set from hearing damage risk considerations and the use of suitable ear protectors.

.7 To indicate the need to wear ear protectors in spaces in which the noise level exceeds 85dB(A), each entrance to the space should be provided with a warning notice comprising a symbol and supplementary sign stating: “High Noise Levels. Use Ear Protection.” Efficient ear protectors should be provided for use in such spaces.

22.7 Training Manual

22.7.1 The yacht’s training manual should include details of established safe working practices specific to the yacht, guidance on training for members of the crew, personal clothing and protection from injury, health and safety awareness, and prevention of pollution.

22.7.2 The training manual should contain instructions and information on the life-saving appliances provided in the yacht and on the best methods of survival in easily understood terms and illustrations where appropriate. Depending on the life-saving appliances provided, the following should be explained in reasonable detail:

.1 donning of lifejackets, immersion suits, and thermal protective aids, as appropriate;

.2 mustering at assigned stations;

.3 boarding, launching and clearing survival craft, rescue boats, fast rescue boats, free-fall boats and inflated boats;

.4 illumination in launching areas;

.5 location and use of pyrotechnics;

.6 use of all survival equipment;

.7 use of all detection equipment;

.8 with the use of illustrations, the use of radio life-saving appliances;

.9 use of sea anchors;

.10 use of engine and accessories;

.11 recovery of survival craft, rescue boats, fast rescue boats, free-fall boats and inflated boats including stowage and securing;

.12 hazards of exposure and the need for warm clothing;

.13 best use of the survival craft facilities in order to survive;

.14 methods of retrieval, including the use of helicopter rescue gear, breeches-buoy and shore life-saving apparatus and yacht’s line-throwing apparatus;

.15 all other functions contained in the muster list and emergency instructions;

.16 instructions for emergency repair of the life-saving appliances;

.17 means of rescue arrangements;

.18 marine evacuation systems; and

.19 helicopter landing and pick-up area operations.

22.7.3 In addition to the requirements of paragraph 22.7.2 above, the skipper should routinely drill the crew who will be sailing on the voyage regarding the following:

.1 location of life rafts and the method of launching;

.2 procedures for the recovery of a person from the sea;

.3 first aid;

.4 procedures and operation of radios carried on board;

.5 location of navigation and other light switches;

.6 location and use of firefighting equipment on various types of fires;

.7 method of starting, stopping, and controlling the main engine; and

.8 method of navigating to a suitable port of refuge.

22.8 Safety Briefing

Before the commencement of any voyage the Master should ensure that all persons on board are briefed on the stowage and use of personal safety equipment such as lifejackets, thermal protective aids and life buoys, and the procedures to be followed in cases of emergency.

22.9 Instructions for on-board maintenance

Instructions should be provided describing the maintenance procedures for all safety and firefighting appliances in easily understood terms and illustrated wherever possible. The instructions should include:

.1 a checklist for use when carrying out required inspections;

.2 maintenance and repair instructions;

.3 a schedule of periodic maintenance;

.4 a diagram of lubrication points with the recommended lubricants;

.5 a list of replacement parts;

.6 a list of sources of spare parts; and

.7 a record of inspection and maintenance.

22.10 Safety Management System

22.10.1 Yachts of less than 500 GT

For all commercially registered vessels of less than 500 GT, where full certification to the ISM Code is not currently required, it is strongly recommended that a safety management system (Annex 13), be implemented at the earliest opportunity, as this will become a mandatory requirement of this Administration as of 1 January 2010.

22.10.2 Yachts of 500 GT and over

All vessels of 500 GT and over must comply with the ISM Code. A safety management system should be in place to show that:

.1 A documented system exists to ensure that all safety and critical equipment are regularly checked and maintained and that this is recorded.

.2 The yacht has identified and prepared for known risks, such as fires, man overboard, grounding and heavy weather.

.3 There is a system of basic on-board training for the crew and the instruction of guests regarding actions to be taken in the event of an emergency.

22.11 Ship Security System

All SOLAS yachts must comply with the ISPS Code requirements. See also Section 29.1.1.5.

23.0 MEDICAL STORES

.1 A yacht should carry medical stores as outlined by the Marshall Islands Marine Guideline 7-42-1, Ship’s Medicine Chest, which provides details of medicines and medical stores to be carried or their suitable equivalent (see Annex 10).

.2 Medical training requirements for members of the complement of the yacht are given in Section 26 and Marshall Islands publication “Requirements for Merchant Marine Personnel Certification” (MI-118).

24.0 SHIP-SHORE TRANSFER of PERSONNEL

24.1 Tenders

.1 A rigid or inflatable tender carried on a yacht should be fit for its intended use.
(Such a tender would be in addition to any lifeboat, rescue boat or inflatable boat which may be carried in compliance with life-saving appliance requirements).

.2 Safety equipment should be provided in each tender as appropriate to its intended range and areas of operation.

.3 Tenders should be clearly marked with the number of persons (mass 75 kg) that they can safely carry, and the name of the parent yacht.

.4 Inflatable tenders should be of types which have a minimum of three (3) buoyancy compartments built into them, and should be maintained in a safe condition by the operator.

.5 In the case of gasoline engine powered tenders, see Section 14.1 for the safety requirements for the carriage of gasoline.

24.2 Helicopters

.1 When provision is made for helicopter operations to and from the yacht, the arrangements should comply with, as a minimum, the requirements of SOLAS Chapter II-2 Regulation 18 – specifically as regards compliance with the Helideck structure, firefighting, refueling, hanger facilities and operations, the provision of an operations manual and appropriate training.

.2 The structural strength of the helicopter landing area should be designed and constructed in accordance with a recognized Classification Society’s Rules on helicopter landing areas for vessels and a Certificate of Compliance issued.

.3 Compliance with the requirements of SOLAS should be confirmed by a Recognized Organization and a Certificate of Compliance issued to the Administration.

24.3 Harbor Pilots for Yachts

Boarding arrangements provided for pilots should have due regard for the international standards of safe practice for the boarding and landing of pilots by pilot boat as recommended in IMO Resolution A.889(21).

24.4 Gangways and Accommodation Ladders

.1 Gangways and accommodation ladders, when provided, should be manufactured to a recognized national or international standard and be clearly marked with the manufacturer’s name, the model number and the maximum design angle of use and the maximum safe loading by number of persons and by total weight.

.2 A gangway to international standards should be carried on a yacht of 30 meters in load line length and over.

.3 Accommodation ladders to international standards should be provided on a yacht of 120 meters in load line length and over.

.4 Access equipment and immediate approaches to it should be adequately illuminated.

25.0 POLLUTION PREVENTION

25.1 MARPOL.

Compliance with the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, 1973, as amended by the Protocol of 1978 (MARPOL), is required as follows:

25.1.1 Annex I – Oil

.1 Annex I applies to all yachts regardless of size unless expressly provided otherwise.

.2 All yachts are required to maintain an oil record book.

.3 All yachts of 400 gross tons or more are required to be issued and carry on board an International Oil Pollution Prevention Certificate (IOPPC) in accordance with Regulation 5 of Annex I.

25.1.2 Annex IV – Sanitation

Annex IV applies to all yachts certified to carry more than 15 persons on board and to all yachts of 400 gross tons or more regardless of the number of persons on board in accordance with Regulation 2, which must carry on board an International Sewage Pollution Prevention Certificate (ISPPC).

25.1.3 Annex V – Garbage

The provisions of this Annex applies to all yachts of 400 gross tons or more and/or certified to carry 15 persons or more. Such yachts shall also be required to carry a Garbage Management Plan, which should include written procedures for collecting, storing, processing and disposing of garbage, including the use of equipment on board. A Garbage Record Book should be provided to record all disposal and incineration operations.

25.1.4 Annex VI – Prevention of Air Pollution from Ships

The provisions of this Annex shall apply to all yachts 400 gross tons or more having diesel engines with an individual power output of more than 130 kW, except where expressly provided otherwise in regulations 3, 5, 6, 13, 15, and 18 of this Annex.

25.2 The International Convention on the Control of Harmful Anti-Fouling Systems on Ships

.1 The International Convention on the Control of Harmful Anti-fouling Systems on Ships prohibits the use of harmful organotins in anti-fouling paints used on vessels and establishes a mechanism to prevent the potential future use of other harmful substances in anti-fouling systems.

.2 Yachts of 400 gross tons or more and engaged in international voyages are be required to undergo an initial survey before the yacht is put into service or before the International Anti-fouling System Certificate is issued for the first time; and a survey when the anti-fouling systems are changed or replaced.

.3 Yachts of 24 meters or more in length but less than 400 gross tons engaged in international voyages are required to carry a Declaration on Anti-fouling Systems signed by the owner or authorized agent. The Declaration will have to be accompanied by appropriate documentation such as a paint receipt or contractor invoice.

25.3 Coastal State Regulations

Special local requirements may exist in national sea areas, ports and harbors. The attention of owners and managing agents is drawn to the need to comply with local requirements as appropriate.

26.0 MANNING AND CERTIFICATION

26.1 Owners Responsibility

It is the responsibility of the owners or managing agents of seagoing commercial yachts of 24 meters in load line length or over to ensure that they are safely manned. The master and, where necessary, other members of the crew of a yacht should have, in addition to the qualifications required in Annex 4, recent and relevant experience with the type and size of yacht and of the type of operation in which she is engaged. The Administration recommends that operators of private yachts be guided by these requirements as well.

26.2 Requirements
.1 In accordance with Marshall Islands Maritime Regulation 7.38.5, minimum safe manning levels will be established by the Office of the Maritime Administrator for every commercial yacht 24 meters and over, and/or 80 gross tons and over.

.2 Levels are determined by yacht size and propulsion power on either long or short international voyages and operating area Category.

.3 All seagoing commercial yachts of more than 24 meters load line length but less than 3000 gross tons should carry qualified Deck and Engineer Officers as required in Annex 4.

.4 All seagoing commercial yachts of more than 3000 gross tons should carry qualified Deck Officers as required by the Marshall Islands publication “Requirements for Merchant Marine Personnel Certification” (MI-118).

.5 All seagoing commercial yachts of 3000 gross tons and over should carry qualified Engineer Officers as required by the Marshall Islands publication “Requirements for Merchant Marine Personnel Certification” (MI-118).

.6 Officers who have qualifications issued by administrations and/or yachting associations that are recognized by this Administration will be considered by the Maritime Administrator on an individual basis.

.7 Personnel within the commercial yachting industry who wish to obtain any of the qualifications listed in Annex 4 should refer to the Marshall Islands publication “Requirements for Merchant Marine Personnel Certification” (MI-118).

.8 The Minimum Safe Manning Certificate should be kept on board the yacht at all times.

26.3 Radio Qualifications

Every yacht should carry, as a minimum, one (1) person who holds an appropriate radio operator’s certificate that is suitable for the radio installation and equipment on board, and reflects the operating area of the yacht. Refer to the Marshall Islands publication “Requirements for Merchant Marine Personnel Certification” (MI-118).

26.4 Medical Fitness Certificates

.1 All ratings and officers who are required to hold Marshall Islands Officer Certificates of Competency and/or Special Qualification Certificates, are required to hold current Marshall Islands Physical Examination Report/Certificates (form MI-105M) or similar form issued by a National Administration in compliance with the requirements of Article 2(a)(iii) of the convention concerning minimum standards in Merchant Ships, Convention 1976 (ILO No 147), under Regulations accepted as equivalent to Medical Examination (Seafarers) Convention 1946 (No 73).

.2 All seafarers are required to provide evidence of medical fitness. A registered medical practitioner should complete the Form MI-105M, or its equivalent in the certificate format specified at Annex 9. It is this certificate that needs to be produced by the seafarer concerned as evidence of medical fitness. The seafarer should retain a copy of the
MI-105M.

26.5 Basic Training Certification

.1 All members of the yacht’s crew must hold a Basic Training Certificate that is recognized by the Administration.

.2 Basic Training Certificates must show evidence of having received appropriate instruction in (a) personal survival techniques, (b) fire prevention and fire fighting, (c) elementary first aid, and (d) personal safety and social responsibilities.

26.6 First Aid Certification

.1 All officers on commercial yachts must hold a First Aid Certificate, which is acceptable to the Administration. Reference should be made to the “Requirements for Merchant Marine Personnel Certification”, Publication MI-118, as amended.

.2 All masters on commercial yachts operating more than 60 miles from a safe haven, or on commercial yachts which are operating in an area where no adequate medical facilities are available, must hold Medical Care Person In Charge Certification, which is acceptable to the Administration.

26.7 Fire Fighting Course

All officers should hold an Advanced Fire Fighting Course Certificate that is acceptable to the Administration.

26.8 Revalidation of Certificates and Licenses

.1 All Master of Yacht Certificates, Officer Certificates of Competency and Special Qualifications Certificates should be revalidated every five (5) years. To revalidate, a submitted applicant should prove at least one (1) year’s service on seagoing yachts of more than 24 meters Load Line length or of over 80 gross tons during the previous five (5) years and be in possession of a valid Medical Fitness Certificate.

.2 Applicants for revalidation who are not able to prove the requisite sea service but are able to demonstrate that during at least half of the five (5) year period they have been employed on duties closely associated with the management and operation of one (1) or more of the appropriate types of yachts, may have their Certificates considered for revalidation.

27.0 PASSENGERS

27.1 Limitations

.1 No yacht to which this Code applies shall carry more than 12 passengers on an international voyage. The limitation to 12 passengers is a statutory constraint and has no connection with the number of beds or berths provided for such persons. Yachts of any gross tonnage carrying more than 12 passengers for consideration will be considered passenger vessels that must be Classed as such and must meet SOLAS passenger ship requirements.

.2 Yachts to which this Code applies may apply to the Administration to carry more than twelve (12) passengers, as guests, on an excursion of very limited duration and range, during which no guest would be berthed on board for an overnight passage and subject to the provision of sufficient life saving appliances. The Owner/Master must provide the Administration with the full particulars of the excursion, full description of LSA, extraordinary safety precautions, local PSC approval, to the complete satisfaction of the Administration.

27.2 Definitions

.1 A passenger is any person, including a business guest, carried in a yacht except:

(a) a person employed or engaged in any capacity on board the yacht on the business of the yacht;

(b) a person on board the yacht either in pursuance of the obligation laid upon the Master to carry shipwrecked, distressed or other persons, or by reason of any circumstances that neither the master nor the owner nor the charterer (if any) could have prevented;

(c) a social guest; and

(d) a child under one (1) year of age.

.2 A person employed or engaged in any capacity on board the yacht on the business of the yacht may include:

(a) bona-fide members of the crew over the minimum age 16 years who are properly employed on the operation of the yacht;

(b) a person or persons employed by the owner in connection with business interests and providing a service available to all passengers; and

(c) a person or persons employed by the owner in relation to social activities on board and providing a service available to all passengers.

(d) The above persons should be included in the crew agreement required for the yacht, should have received on board familiarization training as required by STCW, and should not be assigned duties on the muster list.

27.3 Supernumeraries

Supernumeraries are to be treated as passengers with implications for the service classification of the yacht, unless such supernumeraries are employed by the owner/yacht, directly or indirectly, and have received basic safety training while on board.

28.0 RECOGNIZED ORGANIZATIONS

28.1 Recognized Classification Societies

.1 The organizations recognized by the Administration for the survey and certification of any size yacht are the following:

American Bureau of Shipping Korean Register of Shipping
Bureau Veritas Lloyd’s Register
China Classification Society Nippon Kaiji Kyokai
Det Norske Veritas Polski Rejestr Statkow
Germanischer Lloyd Registro Italiano Navale
Hellenic Registry of Shipping Russian Maritime Register of Shipping

.2 Recognized Classification Societies are aware of the extent to which responsibility has been delegated to issue Load Line Certificates and Cargo Ship Safety Construction Certificates. International Conventions give specific discretion to an Administration to either make exemptions or accept equivalent equipment or arrangements. The formal agreement between the Administration and a recognized Classification Society governs the relationship between the two (2) parties.

28.2 Classification Society Surveyor

.1 An exclusive surveyor from a recognized Classification Society appointed by the Society to make the visit necessary for a survey shall be considered acting on behalf of the Administration.

.2 When a Classification Society surveyor is so appointed, actions taken will be under direct instruction of the Classification Society. The Classification Society will provide the appointed surveyor with detailed guidance on the scope of survey and report required.

28.3 Appointed Representatives

.1 The organizations recognized by the Administration to perform plan review and approval, inspections and examinations and issuance of certain international convention certificates to private yachts of any size and commercial yachts of less than 500 gross tons are the following:

• International Yacht Bureau (www.yachtbureau.org)
• Regs4ships Ltd (www.regs4ships.com)

29.0 SURVEYS, CERTIFICATION, and INSPECTIONS

29.1 General

29.1.1 International Conventions

.1 All commercial yachts covered by this Code must be surveyed and certificated in accordance with the applicable provisions of the International Load Line Convention as modified by this Code.

.2 All commercial yachts greater than 24 meters load line length must be admeasured to the International Tonnage Convention.

.3 All commercial yachts of 500 gross tons and over are required to be surveyed and certificated under the construction and safety equipment requirements of the SOLAS Convention as modified by this Code.

.4 All yachts of 300 gross tons and over are required to be surveyed and certificated under the radio requirements of SOLAS Chapter IV as modified by this Code.

.5 All yachts of 300 gross tons and over are required to be surveyed and certificated under the LRIT requirements of SOLAS Chapter V, Regulation 19.1. Please refer to Republic of the Marshall Islands Marine Notice 2-011-25.

.6 All commercial yachts of 500 gross tons and over are required to be audited and certificated under the safety management requirements of SOLAS Chapter IX and the ISM Code.

.7 All commercial yachts of 500 gross tons and over are required to be audited and certificated under the security requirements of SOLAS Chapter XI-2 and the ISPS Code. For commercial yachts 300 GT and over but under 500 GT, voluntary compliance applies. Please see Marshall Islands Marine Notice 2-011-16.

.8 All yachts of 400 gross tons and over are required to be surveyed and certificated under the MARPOL Convention.

.9 All yachts of 400 gross tons and over and engaged in international voyages must be surveyed and certificated in accordance with the International Convention on the Control of Harmful Anti-fouling Systems on Ships.

.10 All yachts of 1000 gross tons and over are required to be insured and certificated under the Bunker Convention. Please refer to Marshall Islands Marine Notice 2-011-27.

.11 All commercial yachts of 80 gross tons and over shall have a Minimum Safe Manning Certificate.

.12 The Administration considers the Code and its application to commercial yachts to be an equivalent arrangement under the provisions of the applicable Conventions. Annex 5 is the list of certificates to be issued.

29.1.2 Survey Standards

The underlying principle is that for all vessels registered in the Marshall Islands, the same survey standards will apply. Therefore, it has been agreed that this statutory work may be undertaken by Appointed Representatives which are inspectors of the Administration, Authorized Surveyors appointed by the Administration, recognized Classification Society surveyors and, for safety radio, an appropriate service provider in relation to radio installations.

29.1.3 Survey Requests

All requests for survey and certification must be made to an appropriate Appointed Representative of the Administration to make the required arrangements at the required intervals.

29.2 Initial Survey (including newbuilding commercial yachts)

29.2.1 General

.1 Requests for survey and certification should be made by the owner or managing agent direct to the Administration for referral to an Appointed Representative or a recognized Classification Society.

.2 For new construction and existing yachts, Classification Society Surveyors or Authorized Surveyors will be appointed to undertake the day-to-day surveys required and to act as a focal point between the shipbuilders/ship repairers and the Administration.

.3 Fees for the surveys conducted by surveyors of the Administration and surveyors of other Appointed Representatives will be recovered directly from the owner or managing agent by the organization providing the service at its prevailing rates.

.4 Where a vessel is Classed, the Classification Society will normally issue the Statutory certificates. However, if for some reason this is not possible, then the Administration will agree to this being done by an Appointed Representative upon application from the owner.

29.2.2 Load Line Certificate

.1 When a commercial yacht is either in class or under survey to be Classed with a Classification Society, that Classification Society will be authorized to do the survey and the issuance of an International Load Line Certificate (1966).

.2 In any other case, the Administration will assist the owner where possible to arrange the survey by an Appointed Representative and issuance of an International Load Line Certificate (1966).

.3 Exemption from the requirements of the Code for load line marking, conditions of assignment and protection of the crew may be granted only by the Administrator, which is the sole authority for the issuance of a load line exemption certificate. It is not Administration policy to exercise this authority for commercial yachts, except for acceptable conditions within the scope of Article 8 of the ILLC cited as not in compliance with the ILLC in order to facilitate the issuance of an international load line certificate.

29.2.3 Document of Compliance (Yacht of less than 500 gross tons)

The Administration or its Appointed Representative will issue a Marshall Islands Document of Compliance with the Code. A sample of the certificate is in Annex 6.

29.2.4 Cargo Ship Safety Construction Certificate (Yacht of 500 gross tons and over)

Classification Societies recognized by the Administration will survey these yachts and issue Cargo Ship Safety Construction Certificates.

29.2.5 Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate (Yacht of 500 gross tons and over)

A surveyor of a Classification Society recognized by the Administration will carry out surveys and certification of safety equipment on these yachts.

29.2.6 Cargo Ship Safety Radio Certificate (Yacht of 300 gross tons and over)

The survey of radio equipment in accordance with the issuance of a Cargo Ship Safety Radio Certificate will be undertaken by a recognized Classification Society surveyor or an Authorized Surveyor considered by the Administration to be appropriate in relation to radio installations.

29.2.7 LRIT Conformance Test Report Certificate (Yachts of 300 gross tons and over)

The conformance test has been designed to demonstrate compliance of the shipborne equipment with the functional requirements of SOLAS V/19-1.5 and of section 4 of the Performance Standards. Pole Star and Transas Telematics Limited (Transas), both UK companies and leading providers of satellite tracking services, have been appointed to act on behalf of the Republic of the Marshall Islands and the Administration as authorized testing ASPs.

29.2.8 International Safety Management Certificates (Yacht of 500 gross tons and over)

The review and audit of safety management system in accordance with the issuance of a Company Document of Compliance (DOC) and Yacht Safety Management Certificate (SMC) will be undertaken by a recognized Classification Society surveyor or an Appointed Representative considered by the Administration to be appropriate.

29.2.9 International Ship and Port Facility Security Certificates (Yacht of 300 gross tons and over)

The review and audit of ship security system in accordance with the issuance of an International Ship Security Certificate (ISSC) will be undertaken by a recognized Classification Society surveyor or an Appointed Representative considered by the Administration to be appropriate. Commercial yachts, 300 or more but less than 500 gross tonnage (ITC 69), were requested by the IMO to participate in voluntary compliance as from 1 July 2006. The gross tonnage (ITC 69) threshold was reduced to 300 as of 1 July 2008 for certain vessels. While still voluntary for commercial yachts under 500 gross tonnage, mandatory compliance must be anticipated in the very near future. It is a requirement that the vessel’s IMO Identification number be conspicuously marked on a horizontal surface in such a way that allows it to be also read from above.

29.2.10 International Oil Pollution Prevention Certificate (Yacht of 400 gross tons and over)

A recognized Classification Society surveyor or an Authorized Surveyor appointed by the Administration will undertake the survey of yachts for issuance of the initial International Oil Pollution Prevention Certificate.

29.2.11 International Sewage Pollution Prevention Certificate

Annex IV, Regulation 2, applies to all yachts certified to carry more than 15 persons on board and to all yachts of 400 gross tons and over regardless of the number of persons on board. A recognized Classification Society surveyor or an Authorized Surveyor appointed by the Administration will undertake the survey of yachts for issuance of the initial International Sanitation Certificate.

29.2.12 Prevention of Air Pollution from Ships

Annex VI applies to commercial yachts of 400 gross tons or more with diesel engines having an individual power output of more than 130 kW installed. A recognized Classification Society or an Authorized Surveyor appointed by the Administration will undertake the survey of yachts for the issue of the International Air Pollution Prevention Certificate (IAPPC).

29.2.13 International Anti-Fouling Certificate

.1 The International Convention on the Control of Harmful Anti-fouling Systems on Ships prohibits the use of harmful organotins in anti-fouling paints used on vessels and establishes a mechanism to prevent the potential future use of other harmful substances in anti-fouling systems.

.2 Yachts of 400 gross tonnage and above engaged in international voyages are required to undergo an initial survey before the yacht is put into service or before the International Anti-fouling System Certificate is issued for the first time; and a survey when the anti-fouling systems are changed or replaced. A recognized Classification Society or an Authorized Surveyor appointed by the Administration will undertake the survey of yachts for the issue of the Certificate.
.3 Yachts of 24 meters or more in length but less than 400 gross tonnage engaged in international voyages will be required to carry a Declaration on Anti-fouling Systems signed by the owner or authorized agent. The Declaration will have to be accompanied by appropriate documentation such as a paint receipt or contractor invoice.

29.2.14 International Tonnage Certificate

.1 Compliance with the 1969 Tonnage Convention and the issuance of a 1969 Certificate of Tonnage Measurement is required for commercial yachts. A recognized Classification Society surveyor or an Authorized Surveyor appointed by the Administration may perform the admeasurements and certification.

.2 Private yachts and yachts operating exclusively in the domestic waters of the Marshall Islands will not require an international certificate of tonnage measurement regardless of size.

.3 For yachts of less than 24 meters, a National Tonnage Certificate may be issued based on using the simplified tonnage measurement method as detailed in Annex 2 subject to the restrictions in that Annex.

29.2.15 Crew accommodation

.1 The approval of crew accommodation will be undertaken by an Appointed Representative in compliance with the standards defined in Section 21.0.

.2 Any request for exemption from a specified standard should be made to the Administration via an Appointed Representative for a decision.

.3 No certificate is required, however, an optional Statement of Compliance will be provided by the Administration or the Appointed Representative upon request.

29.2.16 Exemption from certain safety regulations
If an owner or managing agent seeks an exemption from the application of specific safety regulations, formal application must be made via an Appointed Representative to the Office of the Maritime Administrator. The Office of the Maritime Administrator will issue an exemption if and when appropriate.

29.3 Periodic Surveys

29.3.1 Load Line Certificates, Cargo Ship Safety Construction Certificates and Documents of Compliance

.1 Annual, intermediate and renewal surveys with respect to the Load Line Certificates, the Cargo Ship Safety Construction Certificates and Documents of Compliance should be carried out to the satisfaction of an Appointed Representative.

.2 Valid for five (5) years in general. No extension is permitted to the five (5) year period of validity of these certificates.

29.3.2 Cargo Ship Safety Equipment and Safety Radio Certificates

.1 Safety Equipment Certificates and Safety Radio Certificates are valid for five (5) years. Annual and renewal surveys should be carried out by a Classification Society surveyor or by an appropriate Authorized Surveyor in relation to radio installations.

.2 An extension to the certificate will be agreed only in cases when it appears proper and reasonable.

29.3.3 Administration Safety Inspections and Document of Compliance

.1 Commercial Yachts of 400 gross tons and above are subject to an annual safety inspection performed by nautical inspectors assigned by the Office of the Maritime Administrator on or before the anniversary date of the issuance of the Commercial Yacht Permanent Certificate of Registry (see sample in Annex 8). Completion of annual safety inspections and surveys are conditions for the continued validity of the Commercial Yacht Permanent Certificate of Registry. Commercial yachts of 400 gross tons and above, but less than 500 gross tons, may be considered to have satisfied this annual inspection requirement upon confirmation by an Appointed Representative that a Commercial Yacht Document of Compliance has been issued and remains valid, provided this is agreed to by the Administration. This will be determined on a case by case basis, and if agreed, a separate annual safety inspection by a nautical inspector will not be required.
.2 Commercial Yachts of less than 400 gross tons must also carry out an annual safety inspection as a condition for the continued validity of the Commercial Yacht Permanent Certificate of Registry.
.3 The annual inspection requirement may be satisfied upon confirmation by an Appointed Representative that a Commercial Yacht Document of Compliance has been issued and remains valid, provided this is agreed to by the Administration. This will be determined on a case by case basis, and if agreed, a separate annual safety inspection by a nautical inspector will not be required.

30.0 ACCIDENT INVESTIGATIONS

.1 The Administration with which the yacht is registered is obliged under SOLAS Regulation I/21 and MARPOL 73/78 articles 8 and 12 to investigate accidents or incidents. Apart from this legal requirement, the Office of the Maritime Administrator investigates such occurrences to demonstrate the effective control and importance Marshall Islands attaches to safety at sea.

.2 It is an offense under Section 720 of the Marshall Islands Maritime Act for the yacht’s Master or owner not to inform the Office of the Maritime Administrator of a reportable accident shortly after it occurs and to provide details so that an assessment of its seriousness can be made quickly. The Office of the Marine Administrator will appoint a suitable Surveyor or Investigator whenever an investigation is required. The Office of the Marine Administrator will then receive the Surveyor’s or the Investigator’s report and will deal with the follow up action.

.3 All serious casualties in accordance with the International Maritime Organization’s (IMO) definition will be reported to IMO by the Office of the Maritime Administrator in the manner prescribed in the Marshall Islands publication “Rules for Marine Investigations and Hearings” (MI-260)

ANNEX 1

GUIDELINES FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF VARIATIONS
TO THE STANDARDS APPLIED BY THE CODE

1. Section 3.3 recognizes that variations to the standards applied by the Code can be considered on the basis that the variations provide equivalent standards of safety by taking into account specific local conditions that are certain to exist.

2. Applications for the acceptance of alternatives must be supported by justifications and be formally made via the Appointed Representative to the Office of the Maritime Administrator.

3. Variations are expected to be either a direct alternative to a requirement or a reduced requirement based upon factors that compensate for the reduction.

4. Justifications made formally in support of an application for acceptance of a reduced requirement are to be arranged in priority order, according to the judgment of the applicant.

5. Although not an exhaustive list, factors that will be considered individually and combined by the Office of the Maritime Administrator will include:

1. area of operations significantly reduced;

2. a guaranteed control of yacht which restricts operations to sea and weather conditions such that there is a very low risk of an accident;

3. the certainty of readily available means of emergency rescue;

4. operations wholly within sight of the local authority and means of emergency rescue;

5. seasonal limitations, such as, between 1 June and 31 October or some lesser period;

6. yachts operating in close proximity to one another and equipped to provide efficient safety back-up to each other in an emergency;

7. provision or wearing of additional (special) individual personal survival equipment or clothing which will protect lives in an emergency;

8. enhanced communications between the yacht(s) and constantly attended shore base with readily available emergency rescue craft at the base;

9. the nature of the sport or pleasure activity involving very low risk of participants accidentally entering the water or causing the yacht to capsize;

10. very restricted operations to sea from a safe beach;

11. inherent safety of the yacht by design, test and experience;

12. a high ratio of professional Master and crew numbers to the number of other persons on board;

13. the number of safety craft provided to protect the yachts operating commercially for sport or pleasure;

14. enhanced provisions for distress alert and rescue; and

15. means provided for “dry” rescue from a yacht in emergency situations.

ANNEX 2

SIMPLIFIED TONNAGE MEASUREMENT METHOD

The following simplified method of measurement may be used, if necessary, for commercial yachts less than 24 meters in load line length and private yachts that do not have their tonnages calculated in accordance with the International Tonnage Convention, 1969:

1.0 Applicability

This simplified tonnage assignment criterion is applicable to monohull and multihull yachts of normal proportions and form. A National Tonnage Certificate should be issued by an Appointed Representative.

2.0 Definitions – For the purpose of this simplified measurement scheme only

.1 Length (L) – Distance in meters measured along the main deck at the centerline of the yacht from the fore side of the hull to the aft side of the transom. Bowsprits, stern mounted diving platforms, and other appendages that do not contribute to the volume of the yacht are not to be included in this measurement.

.2 Breadth (B) – Maximum width of the yacht, excluding rub rails and deck caps, measured in meters from the outside of the hull on one side to the outside of the hull on the other side of the yacht.

.3 Depth (D) – Maximum depth of the yacht measured in meters vertically from the top of the deck at the side to the underside of the hull where it meets the keel or to the point where the projected line of the bottom intersects the yacht’s centerline.

.4 Volume (V) – The product of length, breadth, and depth.

3.0 Measurements

.1 All lengths and depths must be measured in a vertical plane at centerline and breadths must be measured in a line at right angles to that plane. All dimensions must be expressed in meters.

.2 For multihull yachts, each hull must be measured separately for overall length, breadth, and depth and the yacht as a whole must be measured.

4.0 Deck Structures

.1 For most yachts, the formulas listed below account for the volumes of deck structures such as cabins and deckhouses. However, if deck structures are excessive in size, the gross tonnage is calculated by adding the principal deck structure tonnage to the gross tonnage(s) of the yacht’s hull(s).

.2 Deck structures are considered excessive in size if the tonnage of the principal deck structure calculated using the formula below is equal to or exceeds the gross tonnage(s) of the yacht’s hull(s).

Principal Deck Structure Tonnage = L x B x D / 2.831

5.0 Calculations

6.0 Multihull Yachts

Gross Tonnage of a multihull yacht is the sum of the gross tonnages of each hull as calculated using the formulas listed above. For example:

Where L is the length of the center hull and L1 is the length of the outside hulls.

ANNEX 3

OPEN-FLAME GAS INSTALLATIONS

1.0 General Information

.1 Possible dangers arising from the use of liquid petroleum gas (LPG) open flame appliances in the marine environment include fire, explosion and asphyxiation, due to leakage of gas from the installation.

.2 Consequently, the location of gas-consuming appliances and storage containers and the provision of adequate ventilation to spaces containing them, is most important.

.3 It is dangerous to sleep in spaces where gas-consuming open flame appliances are left burning, because of the risk of carbon monoxide poisoning.

.4 LPG, which is heavier than air, when released, may travel some distance while seeking the lowest part of a space. Therefore, it is possible for gas to accumulate in relatively inaccessible areas, such as bilges, and diffuse to form an explosive mixture with air, as in the case of petroleum vapor.

.5 A frequent cause of accidents involving LPG installations is the use of unsuitable fittings and improvised “temporary” repairs.

2.0 Stowage of Gas Containers

.1 Gas containers should be stowed on the open deck or in an enclosure opening only to the deck or overboard and otherwise gastight, so that any gas, which may leak from the containers, can disperse overboard.

.2 In multiple container installations a non-return valve should be placed in the supply line near to the stop valve on each container. If a changeover device is used, it should be provided with non-return valves to isolate any depleted container.

.3 Where more than one (1) container can supply a system, the system should not be used with a container removed.

.4 Containers not in use or not being fitted into an installation should have the protecting cap in place over the container valve.

3.0 Fittings and Pipework

.1 Solid drawn copper alloy or stainless steel tube with appropriate compression or screwed fittings is recommended for general use for pipework in LPG installations.

.2 Aluminum or steel tubing, or any material having a low melting point, such as rubber or plastic, should not be used, except as permitted by paragraph 3.3.

.3 Lengths of flexible piping (if required for flexible connections) should be kept as short as possible and be protected from inadvertent damage. Also, the piping should conform to an appropriate standard.

Proposals for a more extensive use of flexible piping (which conforms to an internationally recognized standard for its application) should be submitted to the Administration via its Appointed Representative for approval on an individual basis.

4.0 Open Flame Heaters and Gas Refrigerators

.1 When such appliances are installed, they should be well secured to avoid movement and, preferably, be of a type where the gas flames are isolated in a totally enclosed shield where the air supply and combustion gas outlets are piped to open air.

.2 In refrigerators, where the burners are fitted with flame arrester gauze, shielding of the flame may be an optional feature.

.3 Refrigerators should be fitted with a flame failure device.

.4 Flue-less heaters should be selected only if fitted with atmosphere-sensitive cut-off devices to shut off the gas supply at a carbon dioxide concentration of not more than 1.5% by volume.

.5 Heaters of a catalytic type should not be used.

5.0 Flame Failure Devices

All gas consuming devices should be fitted, where practicable, with an automatic gas shut-off device that operates in the event of flame failure.

6.0 Gas Detection

.1 Suitable means for detecting the leakage of gas should be provided in any compartment containing a gas-consuming appliance, or in any adjoining space of a compartment into which the gas (more dense than air) may seep.

.2 Gas detectors should be securely fixed in the lower part of the compartment in the vicinity of the gas-consuming appliance and in other space(s) into which gas may seep.

.3 Any gas detector should, preferably, be of a type that will be actuated promptly, and automatically by the presence of a gas concentration in air of not greater than 0.5% (representing approximately 25% of the lower explosive limit) and should incorporate an audible and a visible alarm.

.4 Where electrical detection equipment is fitted, it should be certified as being flameproof or intrinsically safe for the gas being used.

.5 In all cases, the arrangements should be such that the detection system can be tested frequently while the yacht is in service.

7.0 Emergency Action

.1 A suitable notice, detailing the action to be taken when an alarm is given by the gas detection system, should be displayed prominently in the yacht.

.2 The information given should include the following:

(a) The need to be ever alert for gas leakage; and

(b) When leakage is detected or suspected, all gas-consuming appliances should be shut off at the main supply from the containers, and NO SMOKING should be permitted until it is safe to do so.

(c) Naked lights should never be used as a means of locating gas leaks.

ANNEX 4

MINIMUM MANNING LEVELS FOR COMMERCIAL YACHTS OVER 24M

1.0 GENERAL

1.1 It is the overriding responsibility of the owner or managing agent of a commercial yacht to ensure that the yacht’s Master and, where necessary, members of the crew have, in addition to the qualifications required in this Annex, recent and relevant experience on the type and size of yacht and with the type of operation for which the yacht is certified. The Administration recommends that operators of private yachts be guided by these requirements as well.

1.2 A Minimum Safe Manning Certificate (MSMC), issued from the Office of the Maritime Administrator, is required for all commercial yachts of 24 meters load line length or more, and/or, of 80 gross tons or more.

1.3 All Officers, and some ratings, on Marshall Islands registered commercial yachts, and private yachts over 24 meters and 80 GT, and engaged in chartering, under the 84 day provision, must be issued an original Marshall Islands Certificate of Competence which will state their position and limitations corresponding to the MSMC. An exception would be for endorsements of recognized Certificates from other jurisdictions which match exactly or exceed the Certificate needed for the position to be held on a Marshall Islands registered yacht. Renewals of existing endorsement Certificates may require the issuance of a new Marshall Islands Certificate, which will state their position and limitations corresponding to the MSMC.

1.4 Marshall Islands certificates are issued either as original documents or endorsements. Applicants for an endorsement of their National Certificate of Competency (CoC, also called a License) should complete application MI-105.

1.5 Original documentation is issued on the basis of passing an examination. All applicants who have passed an examination for an Officer’s License that was administered by an entity who has been recognized by the Administration are eligible to receive Marshall Islands original certificates equivalent in grade to the level of examination that was passed. If the examination was not administered by the Marshall Islands, a letter of fact stating that the applicant received a passing grade on the examination must be submitted with his/her application. Candidates applying for a Marshall Islands examination or for certification based upon passing an examination administered by a recognized facility should use application MI-105E.

1.6 All applications must be supplemented with copies of the applicant’s current certifications, training course certificates and training history, past sailing experience including sea time, and particulars of the MI registered yacht on which they will serve (i.e. Gross tonnage, propulsion power, and trading area).

1.7 The applicant should realize that, after evaluation of their application, they may not qualify for the yacht upon which they expect to serve. In such cases the requested examination will not be administered or the requested certification will not be issued, whichever the case may be.

1.8 All Certificates will be issued with a limitation to yachts at the capacity for which the applicant qualifies.

1.9 Consideration may be given on a case by case basis for Kw limitations to take into consideration the individual Kw of each main propulsion unit of the yacht.

REQUIRED BY STCW
Category Personnel Yacht Size
3000 kW
Chief Engineer — III/3 III/2
Second Engineer — — —
OIEW / EOOW — — —
Yacht Ratings – Engine III/4 — —

Category Personnel Yacht Size
3000 kW
Chief Engineer — III/3 III/2
Second Engineer — — —
OIEW / EOOW — — III/1
Yacht Ratings – Engine III/4 III/4 —

Category Personnel Yacht Size
3000 kW
Chief Engineer — III/3 III/2
Second Engineer — III/3 III/2
OIEW / EOOW III/1 — III/1
Yacht Ratings – Engine III/4 — —

ANNEX 5

LIST OF CERTIFICATES TO BE ISSUED

Certification Subject & Convention Marshall Islands Regulations Survey & Certification Tasked To Limits Detail & Remarks
Certificate of Registry Nationality Reg. 2.20 Office of the Maritime Administrator All Yachts Required to fly the flag of the Marshall Islands
International Tonnage Certificate Tonnage
ITC 69 Reg. 2.19 Class/Appointed Representative Yachts over 24m Loadline Length. Required for registration.
International Load Line Certificate Load Line
ILLC66 Reg. 2.15 Class/Appointed Representative > 24 meters Intact Stability & Subdivision Standard;
Using equivalent standards of the Code
Safety Management Certificate Safe Operation of Ships
SOLAS 74 Reg. 2.11.4 Class/Appointed Representative > 500 GT
Document of Compliance Various
Commercial Yacht Code Reg. 2.11.6 Office of the Maritime Administrator/ Class/ Appointed Representative ≤ 500 GT Covers aspects surveyed under the Code for which other certificates are not required
Safety Construction Certificate Construction
SOLAS 74 Reg. 2.11/2.17 Class > 500 GT Construction
Fire Protection
SOLAS 74 Reg. 2.11/2.17 Class > 500 GT Structural Fire Protection & Means of Escape
Safety Equipment Certificate Fire Fighting Appliances
SOLAS 74 Reg. 2.11/2.17 Class > 500 GT Fire Appliances
Life-Saving Appliances
SOLAS 74 Reg. 2.11/2.17 Class > 500 GT Life-Saving Appliances
Navigation Equipment COLREGS 72 Reg. 2.11.3/2.17 Class/Appointed Representative All Yachts Navigation lights, sounds, signals, etc.
Safety Radio Certificate Radio SOLAS 74 Reg. 2.11.7/2.17 Class/Appointed Representative > 300 GT
International Ship Security Certificate Maritime Security
SOLAS 74 Reg. 2.11.5 Class/Appointed Representative > 300 GT Special measures to enhance maritime security
LRIT Conformance Test Report Safety of Navigation
SOLAS 74 MN 2-011-25
MG 2-11-6 Appointed Representative > 300 GT Long Range Identification and Tracking of ships to enhance maritime security
International Oil Pollution Prevention Certificate Pollution
MARPOL Annex I Reg. 2.13.2 Class/Appointed Representative > 400 GT Pollution prevention equipment

International Sewage Pollution Prevention Certificate Pollution
MARPOL Annex IV Reg. 2.13.5 Class/Appointed Representative > 15 Persons
> 400 GT Sewage treatment equipment
International Air Pollution Prevention Certificate Pollution
MARPOL Annex VI Reg. 2.13.7 Class/Appointed Representative > 400 GT
Having diesel engines with an individual power output of more than 130 kW
International Anti-fouling System Certificate Anti-fouling Systems Convention Class/Appointed Representative > 400 GT
Precautions required to protect the marine aquatic environment
Ship Radio Station License Communications Reg. 4.33 Office of the Maritime Administrator All Yachts Radio Call and Signal Letters, frequency assignments, station licensing, Inmarsat, etc.
Minimum Safe Manning Certificate Manning
STCW/SOLAS Office of the Maritime Administrator > 24m load line length, and/or 80 GT Levels and Qualifications
Bunker Convention Certificate CLBC Civil Liability for Bunker Oil Pollution Damage Convention Reg. 2.11.2 Office of the Maritime Administrator > 1000 GT Applies to Commercial and Private Yachts
Exemption Certificate Various As Applicable to the subject Office of the Maritime Administrator All Yachts Covers exemption from the regulations relative to the subject

NOTES: 1. The Administration retains the right to survey and issue certificates for all of the above items.
2. References to regulations mentioned above should be construed as including any amendment to those regulations that may be made from time to time.

ANNEX 6

DOCUMENT OF COMPLIANCE – COMMERCIAL YACHT

REPUBLIC OF THE MARSHALL ISLANDS
OFFICE OF THE MARITIME ADMINISTRATOR

COMMERCIAL YACHT
DOCUMENT OF COMPLIANCE

NAME OF YACHT OFFICIAL NUMBER PORT OF
REGISTRY TONNAGE LENGTH GROSS TONNAGE

THIS IS TO CERTIFY
1. that the yacht has been surveyed in accordance with the Marshall Islands Maritime Regulations (as amended);
2. that the yacht has been found to be in compliance with the requirements of the Marshall Islands Commercial Yacht Code for the construction, machinery, equipment, stability and inspection of Motor/Sailing Yachts, of 24 meters or more in load line length; and less than 500 gross tons; in commercial use for sport and pleasure, and not carrying cargo or more than 12 passengers;
3. that the total number of persons for which life-saving appliances are provided is ;
4. that the hull of the yacht was surveyed on ; and
5. that the following operational limitations apply:

This certificate is issued under the authority of the Republic of the Marshall Islands.
It will remain in force, unless previously cancelled, until the day of , 20
subject to the yacht, its machinery and equipment being efficiently maintained, annually surveyed and manned in compliance with the Commercial Yacht Code.

Issued at on the day of 20

The undersigned declares that he is duly authorized by the said Government to issue this certificate.

(Print Name & Sign) Authorized Agent of the Republic of the Marshall Islands

Note: Annual surveys should be carried out within a three month period either side of the anniversary of the date on which the hull was surveyed as recorded at 4. on page 1.

1st Annual Survey Place
Official Stamp Date
Surveyor
2nd Annual Survey Place
Official Stamp Date
Surveyor
3rd Annual Survey Place
Official Stamp Date
Surveyor
4th Annual Survey Place
Official Stamp Date
Surveyor

ANNEX 7

DOCUMENT OF COMPLIANCE – PRIVATE YACHT

REPUBLIC OF THE MARSHALL ISLANDS
OFFICE OF THE MARITIME ADMINISTRATOR

PRIVATE YACHT
DOCUMENT OF COMPLIANCE

NAME OF YACHT OFFICIAL NUMBER PORT OF
REGISTRY TONNAGE LENGTH GROSS TONNAGE

THIS IS TO CERTIFY
1. that the yacht has been surveyed in accordance with the Marshall Islands Maritime Regulations (as amended);
2. that the yacht has been found to be in compliance with the requirements of the Marshall Islands Commercial Yacht Code for the construction, machinery, equipment, stability and inspection of Motor/Sailing Yachts in private use for sport and pleasure;
3. that the total number of persons for which life-saving appliances are provided is ;
4. that the hull of the yacht was surveyed on ; and
5. that the following operational limitations apply:

This certificate is issued under the authority of the Republic of the Marshall Islands.
It will remain in force, unless previously cancelled, until the day of , 20
subject to the yacht, its machinery and equipment being efficiently maintained, annually surveyed and manned in compliance with the Commercial Yacht Code.

Issued at on the day of 20
Signed Name Date

Note: If a three (3) year certificate is issued, annual surveys should be carried out within a three month period either side of the anniversary of the date on which the hull was surveyed as recorded at 4. on page 1.

1st Annual Survey Place
Official Stamp Date
Surveyor
2nd Annual Survey Place
Official Stamp Date
Surveyor

ANNEX 8

COMMERCIAL YACHT PERMANENT CERTIFICATE OF REGISTRY

Certificate Number

Republic of the Marshall Islands

Office of the Maritime Administrator

Commercial Yacht
Permanent Certificate of Registry

OFFICIAL NUMBER: CALL LETTERS: SERVICE: MOTOR / SAIL
VESSEL NAME: HOME PORT:
THIS IS TO CERTIFY THAT pursuant to the provisions of the Marshall Islands Maritime Act 1990, [Name of Authorized Signatory] having submitted the required declaration of ownership does depose and say that:
NAME RESIDENCE CITIZENSHIP PROPORTION

is (are) the sole owner(s) of the herein named and described vessel
FORMER NAME: YEAR BUILT:
BUILT BY: PLACE BUILT:
CLASS SOCIETY: GROSS TONS: NET TONS:
ENGINE MANUFACTURER:
NO. AND TYPE OF ENGINES: PROPELLING POWER (KW):
NUMBER OF MASTS: NUMBER OF DECKS: HULL MATERIAL: [Wood/ Steel/Aluminum/Composite]
LENGTH: BREADTH: DEPTH: HEIGHT (if applicable):

and WHEREAS the Maritime Administrator, on behalf of the Government of the Marshall Islands approved the application of the aforesaid owner for registration of the vessel and whereas the owner has complied with the requirements for registration and submitted same, the vessel is therefore duly registered under the Laws and Flag of the Republic of the Marshall Islands.

This vessel is subject to the following operational limitations:

This Certificate of Registry and all rights and privileges accorded thereunder, shall remain valid on a continuous basis, provided the owner has complied with the requirements for revalidation and a copy of the current year’s Annual Tonnage Tax Receipt is attached hereto.

Issued by the Authority of the Government of the Republic of the Marshall Islands at [Reston, Virginia, U. S. A. / New York, New York, U.S.A.] this [ ] day of [ ], 20[ ].

Guy E. C. Maitland
Senior Deputy Commissioner

ANNEX 9

CERTIFICATE OF MEDICAL FITNESS
PHYSICAL EXAMINATION REPORT/CERTIFICATE
MARITIME ADMINISTRATOR

REPUBLIC OF THE MARSHALL ISLANDS
SURNAME
GIVEN NAME(S)

DATE OF BIRTH

MONTH DAY YEAR PLACE OF BIRTH

CITY COUNTRY SEX

0MALE 0FEMALE

EXAMINATION FOR DUTY AS:
MASTER 0
MATE 0
ENGINEER 0
RADIO OFF 0
RATING 0
MAILING ADDRESS OF APPLICANT:

MEDICAL EXAMINATION (SEE REVERSE SIDE FOR MEDICAL REQUIREMENTS) STATE DETAILS ON REVERSE SIDE
HEIGHT
WEIGHT
BLOOD PRESSURE
PULSE
RESPIRATION
GENERAL APPEARANCE

VISION:
WITHOUT GLASSES RIGHT EYE
/ LEFT EYE
HEARING:
WITH GLASSES / RT. EAR LEFT EAR

COLOR TEST TYPE: BOOK 0 LANTERN 0 CHECK IF COLOR TEST IS NORMAL – YELLOW 0 RED 0 GREEN 0 BLUE 0

HEAD AND NECK
HEART (CARDIOVASCULAR)

LUNGS
SPEECH (DECK/NAVIGATIONAL OFFICER AND RADIO OFFICER)
IS SPEECH UNIMPAIRED FOR NORMAL VOICE COMMUNICATION?

EXTREMITIES:
UPPER LOWER

IS APPLICANT SUFFERING FROM ANY DISEASE LIKELY TO BE AGGRAVATED BY, OR TO RENDER HIM UNFIT FOR SERVICE AT SEA OR LIKELY TO ENDANGER THE HEALTH OF OTHER PERSONS ON BOARD?

SIGNATURE OF APPLICANT DATE
THIS SIGNATURE SHOULD BE AFFIXED IN THE PRESENCE OF THE EXAMINING PHYSICIAN.
THIS IS TO CERTIFY THAT A PHYSICAL EXAMINATION WAS GIVEN TO:
(NAME OF APPLICANT)
(HE) (SHE) IS FOUND TO BE (FIT) (NOT FIT) FOR DUTY AS A: (MASTER, MATE, ENGINEER, RADIO OFFICER OR RATING)

NAME AND DEGREE OF PHYSICIAN
ADDRESS
NAME OF PHYSICIAN’S CERTIFICATING AUTHORITY
DATE OF ISSUE OF PHYSICIAN’S CERTIFICATE
SIGNATURE OF PHYSICIAN
DATE
This certificate is issued by authority of the Maritime Administrator and in compliance with the requirements
of the Medical Examination (Seafarers) Convention 1946 (ILO No. 73)
Rev. 5/08 MI-105M

MEDICAL REQUIREMENTS
All applicants for an officer certificate, Seafarer’s Identification and Record Book or certification of special qualifications shall be required to have a physical examination reported on this Medical Form completed by a certificated physician. The completed medical form must accompany the application for officer certificate, application for seafarer’s identity document, or application for certification of special qualifications. This physical examination must be carried out not more than 12 months prior to the date of making application for an officer certificate, certification of special qualifications or a seafarer’s book. Such proof of examination must establish that the applicant is in satisfactory physical condition for the specific duty assignment undertaken and is generally in possession of all body faculties necessary in fulfilling the requirements of the seafaring profession. In addition, the following minimum requirements shall apply:
(a) All applicants must have hearing unimpaired for normal sounds and be capable of hearing a whispered voice in better ear at 15 feet and in poorer ear at 5 feet.
(b) Deck officer applicants must have (either with or without glasses) at least 20/20 vision in one eye and at least 20/40 in the other. If the applicant wears glasses, he must have vision without glasses of at least 20/160 in both eyes. Deck officer applicants must also have normal color perception and be capable of distinguishing the colors red, green, blue and yellow.
(c) Engineer and radio officer applicants must have (either with or without glasses) at least 20/30 vision in one eye and at least 20/50 in the other. If the applicant wears glasses, he must have vision without glasses of at least 20/200 in both eyes. Engineer and radio officer applicants must also be able to perceive the colors red, yellow and green.
(d) An applicant’s blood pressure must fall within an average range, taking age into consideration.
(e) Applicants afflicted with any of the following diseases or conditions shall be disqualified: epilepsy, insanity, senility, alcoholism, tuberculosis, acute venereal disease or neurosyphilis, AIDS and/or the use of narcotics.
(f) Deck/Navigational officer applicants and Radio officer applicants must have speech which is unimpaired for normal voice communication.
(g) Applicants for able seaman, bosun, GP-1, ordinary seaman and junior ordinary seaman must meet the physical requirements for a deck/navigational officer’s certificate.
(h) Applicants for fireman/watertender, oiler/motorman, pumpman, electrician, wiper, tankerman and survival craft/rescue boat crewman must meet the physical requirements for an engineer officer’s certificate.

IMPORTANT NOTE:
A copy of the MI-105M must accompany the application. The applicant must retain the original of the MI-105M as evidence of physical qualification while serving on board a vessel.

DETAILS OF MEDICAL EXAMINATION
(To be completed by examining physician)

Rev. 5/08 MI-105M

ANNEX 10

MARSHALL ISLANDS MARINE GUIDELINE 7-42-1, SHIP’S MEDICINE CHEST

REPUBLIC OF Marine Guideline
THE MARSHALL ISLANDS
No. 7-42-1
OFFICE OF THE
MARITIME ADMINISTRATOR 10/06

TO: ALL SHIPOWNERS, OPERATORS, MASTERS AND OFFICERS OF MERCHANT SHIPS, AND RECOGNIZED ORGANIZATIONS

SUBJECT: Ship’s Medicine Chest.

Reference: (a) Maritime Regulation 7.42.5
(b) World Health Organization (WHO) International Medical Guide

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this Marine Guideline is to provide guidance for vessel owners, operators and managers of the Marshall Islands as to the National requirements for Ship’s Medicine Chests. This Guideline supersedes previously numbered Marshall Islands Marine Notice 7-041-5, Rev. 12/05.

APPLICABILITY:

This instruction should be followed by all Marshall Islands vessels engaged in commerce and on international voyages.

GUIDELINES:

1.0 General

Every Marshall Islands vessel is required to have on board a Ship’s Medicine Chest to ensure the health and safety of the vessel’s crew. The World Health Organization (WHO), which is a specialized agency of the United Nations, has set standards for medicines and medical supplies that should be maintained on board vessels. The Marshall Islands has accepted these basic standards, and this Guideline is intended for use by vessels that have not yet adopted a standard.

2.0 Equivalencies

The Marshall Islands is aware that other administrations have established standards that are equal to, exceed, and/or are more up-to-date than the WHO standards. For example, European Union Member States use Council Directive 92/29/EEC of 31 March 1992 as a basis for establishing minimum medical supplies and equipment required to be carried on Member State ships. Provided these inventories are effectively equal to, or exceed, WHO standards, they shall be considered in compliance with Administration requirements.

3.0 Assumptions

In determining these guidelines, several assumptions have been made:

3.1 The officers on board whom are designated, as “medical care providers” will have sufficient training per STCW standards to ensure proper utilization of all medicines or medical supplies on board.

3.2 Sufficient reference material or product use and identification cards related to the medicines carried will be available on board the vessel.

3.3 Medical instructions and, if necessary, the medicine labeling are in a language understood by the crew.

3.4 The Ship’s Captain’s Medical Guide, or equivalent, is being referred to, and/or appropriate radio medical consultation is being received for help with diagnosis and treatment.

4.0 Vessel Requirements

4.1 The requirements of the Ship’s Medicine Chest vary depending on the vessel’s route and number of persons on board.

4.2 The minimum carriage requirements for medicines and medical equipment to be carried by ships set forth by the WHO standards are detailed in Annex 1. When observing an equivalency to the WHO standards, the corresponding equivalency carriage requirement shall be used. In any case, the minimum carriage requirements for medicines and medical equipment shall be consistent with the guidelines in use.

4.3 Mobile and immobile floating production, storage and offloading units (FPSOs) and floating storage units (FSUs): Owners and operators may, on advice of a qualified medical practitioner or pharmacist, establish the requisite Medicine Chest based upon the nature of vessel employment, number of crew, distance offshore, availability of immediate MEDEVAC, industry standards, etc. This applies to both WHO standards and equivalency guidelines.

5.0 Other Requirements

5.1 All medicines should be kept by the Master, or other responsible officer, to ensure that the medications are properly dispensed and that records are kept of their disposition.

5.2 It must be remembered that WHO standards and equivalency guidelines are minimum carriage requirements. For this reason, the Ship’s Medicine Chest must be inventoried frequently and re-supplied as necessary. In any event, the medicine chest should be inventoried no less than once a year.

5.3 Medicines with expiration dates shall be replaced at the earliest possible date after the expiration date, and in any case within three (3) months of the expiration date. Once replaced, expired medicines should be removed from the vessel and disposed of properly.

6.0 Controlled Drugs

6.1 Controlled drugs are drugs that are graded according to the harmfulness attributed to the drug when it is misused. For this purpose, there are three drug categories:

Class A includes heroin, morphine, and opium
Class B includes barbiturates and codeine
Class C includes, among other drugs, anabolic steroids

6.2 A ship must not carry excess quantities of Class A or Class C drugs unless authorized by the Administration. Morphine Sulphate is the only Class A drug authorized to be carried aboard Marshall Islands flagged ships.

6.3 It is illegal to destroy Class A and Class B drugs. They can be disposed of by giving them to a person who may lawfully supply them, such as a qualified doctor or pharmacist. An appropriate receipt shall be obtained and an entry made in the medical log regarding their disposition.

6.4 Some countries do not allow the sale of controlled drugs to ships not registered in that country; therefore, shipmanagers are encouraged to become familiar with the controlled drug distribution laws in the countries where their ships are trading and to communicate directly with the cognizant authorities to learn of the options available for the procurement and delivery of controlled drugs to ships operating in these areas.

7.0 Carriage of Defibrillators

7.1 There is no statutory requirement under international or national legislation for ships to carry defibrillators. It is accordingly a matter for individual operators to decide whether or not to include a defibrillator with the medical stores or doctor’s bag.

7.2 If a defibrillator is carried, the Administration recommends that systems be in place to ensure regular maintenance of the equipment (in accordance with manufacturer’s instructions), and adequate training for the first aid providers, including regular refresher training (at least every six months). Training should also particularly cover care of the patient after defibrillation, bearing in mind that immediate hospitalization may not be possible.

8.0 Medicines for Ship’s Carrying Dangerous Cargoes

8.1 Ships, including ferries, carrying dangerous cargoes or their residues, should comply with the International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) Code and the guidance in the IMO/WHO/ILO Medical First Aid Guide for use in accidents involving Dangerous Goods (MFAG) 1994 and any subsequent amendments.

Annex 1

Minimum Carriage Requirements for Medicines and Medical Supplies

Vessel Number of Persons Requirement
Oceangoing ships Up to 40 Table I
41 to 99 Double Table I
Over 100 Doctor on board
Fishing vessels on extended voyages Up to 40 Table II
Coastal, Great Lakes or nearby foreign ports with voyages not more than 12 hours Up to 25 Table II
Fishing vessels on voyages of seven days or less and in close proximity to a port of call and pleasure yachts on voyages more than 175 miles from safe harbor Up to 15 Table III
Mobile and immobile floating production, storage and offloading units (FPSOs) and floating storage units (FSUs) n/a See Note (1)
Pleasure yachts on voyages not more than 60 miles from safe harbor Up to 15
More than 15 Table IV
Double Table IV
Pleasure yachts on voyages more than 60 miles but less than 175 miles from safe harbor Up to 15
More than 15 Double Table IV
Table III
Ro-Ro Passenger Ships not normally carrying a medical doctor – Emergency Medical Kit/Bag N/A Table V
Vessels that normally carry six (6) or fewer persons 6 or fewer Commercially available kit
Note: Owners and operators may, on advice of a qualified medical practitioner or pharmacist, establish the requisite Medicine Chest based upon the nature of vessel employment, number of crew, distance offshore, availability of immediate MEDEVAC, industry standards, etc.

Table I

INTERNATIONAL MEDICAL GUIDE FOR SHIPS
WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO) A-LIST

Product Size Quantity
Aspirin 325 mg Tablets-100 tablets per 100 6
Alcohol 70% Rubbing Isopropyl-16 oz bottles 16 oz 6
Aluminum Acetic Acid 2% Otic Solution (Domeboro) 60 ml 60 ml 2
Aluminum Acetate Powder (Domeboro)-12 oz 12 oz 2
Alumina and Magnesia Gel (Maalox)-12 oz 12 oz 6
Alumina and Magnesia Tablets (Maalox)-100 tablets per 100 10
Aminophylline 500 mg Suppositories Disc By Mfg.-10 pack 10 pack 2
Amitriptyline 25 mg Tablets (Elavil)-100 tablets per 100 1
Ampicillin 250 mg Capsules-100 capsules per 100 3
Hemorrhoidal Suppositories-12 pack 12 pack 6
Vitamin C 250 mg Tablets (Ascorbic Acid)-100 tablets per 100 3
Atropine Sulfate 0.4 mg/ml Injection-1 ml units 1 ml 60
Ampicillin 1 gm Injection-Each Each 20
Tolnaftate 1% Cream (Tinactin)-15 gm tube 15 gm 4
Calamine Lotion-4 oz size 4 oz 8
Calcium Gluconate 648 mg Tablets-Each Each 30
Hibiclens Solution (Chlorhexidine Gluconate)-16 oz 16 oz 3
Charcoal, Activated Powder-227g 227g 1
Chloroquine 250 mg Tablets-100 tablets per 100 1
Chlorphenamine Maleate 4 mg Tablets-100 tablets per 100 1
Diphenhydramine 50 mg/ml Injection (Benadryl)-1 ml units 1 ml 20
Chlorpromazine 25 mg Tablets (Thorazine)-Each Each 100
Chlorpromazine 25 mg/ml Injection (Thorazine)-1 ml units 1 ml 20
Clove Oil-1 oz 1 oz 2
Acetaminophen W/Codeine 30 mg Tablets (Tylenol)-100 tablets per 100 1
Meclizine 25 mg Tablets (Antivert)-100 tablets per 100 4
Dextran 6% & 0.9% Sodium Chloride IV Injection-500 ml units 500 ml 6
Diazepam 5 mg/ml Injection (Valium)-2 ml units 2 ml 20
Diazepam 5 mg Tablets (Valium)-100 tablets per 100 2
Dimercaprol 100 mg/ml Injection-2 ml units 2 ml 6
Doxycycline 100 mg Capsules-50 capsules per 50 4
Ephedrine Sulfate 25 mg Capsules-100 capsules per 100 1
Epinephrine 1 mg/ml Injection-1 ml units 1 ml 20
Methergine 0.2 mg/1 ml Injection-1 ml units 1 ml 10
Erythromycin 250 mg Tablets-100 tablets per 100 3
Tetracaine 0.5% Ophth Solution (Pontocaine)-15 ml units 15 ml 2
Triple Antibiotic Ophth Solution-10 ml units 10 ml 3
Triple Antibiotic Ophth Ointment (Neosporin)-3.5 gm 3.5 gm 6
Eye Wash Sterile-4 oz 4 oz 6
Fluorets Sodium Eye Strips-100 per box 100 2
Furosemide 40 mg Tablets (Lasix)-100 tablets per 100 1
Nitro-Quick 0.4 mg Sublingual Tablets-25 25 2
Solu-Cortef 100 mg Vial Injection (Hydrocortisone)-Each Each 5
Hydrocortisone 1% Ointment-1 oz 1 oz 6
Ichthammol 10% Ointment-1 oz 1 oz 6
Insect Repellent Pump-2 oz 2 oz 12
Iodine Tincture 2% Mild-1 oz 1 oz 10
Xylocaine 1% 10 mg/ml Injection (Lidocaine)-2 ml units 2 ml 12
Lindane Lotion (Kwell)-2 oz 2 oz 12
Milk Of Magnesia-12 oz 12 oz 8
Metronidazole 250 mg Tablets (Flagyl)-100 tablets per 100 5
Miconazole Vaginal Cream (Micatin)-45 gm 45 gm 5
Miconazole Vaginal Suppositories 7 W/Applicator-Each Each 3
Mineral Oil Heavy-16 oz 16 oz 1
Morphine Sulfate 10 mg/ml Injection-1 ml units 1 ml 20
Naloxone Hydrochloride 0.4 mg/ml Injection (Narcan)-1 ml units 1 ml 6
Triple Antibiotic Ointment (Neosporin)-1 oz 1 oz 20
Electrolyte Tablets-100 tablets per 100 1
Oxygen Refill Size “D”-Each Each 2
Acetaminophen 500 mg Tablets (Tylenol)-100 tablets per 100 3
Petrolatum Ointment-1 oz 1 oz 12
Phenobarbital 30 mg Tablets-100 tablets per 100 3
Penicillin VK 250 mg Tablets-100 tablets per 100 3
Pilocarpine 2% Ophth Solution (Isopto Carpine)-15 ml units 15 ml 2
Potassium Permanganate Crystal-500g 500g 1
Probenecid 500 mg Tablets (Benemid)-100 tablets per 100 2
Ampicillin 500 mg Injection-Each Each 20
Proguanil 100 mg (Pauludrine)-100 100 1
Pinworm Caplets (Pyrantel)-24 24 2
Quinine Sulfate 325 mg Capsules-100 capsules per 100 2
Quinine Dihydrochloride Injection 300 mg/ml-2 ml units 2 ml 20
Albuterol 17g Inhalation (Proventil)-200 Metered 200 Metered 2
Sodium Chloride 0.9% IV Injection-1000 ml units 1000 ml 6
IV Solution Set Vented W/Injection Site 15 drop/ml Each Each 6
IV Solution Set 15 Drops/ml Macrodrip –Each Each 6
Thermotabs (Enteric Coated Salt Tablets)-100 tablets per 100 20
Trobicin Sterile Powder Injection (Spectinomycin) 2 g 20
Sulfamethoxazole/Trimeth 400 mg/80 mg Tabs (Bactrim)-100 tablets per 100 2
Baby Powder J & J (Talc)-4 oz 4 oz 6
Tetanus Immune Globulin (Human) Prefilled Syringe-250 Units 250 Units 5
Tetanus Toxoid Prefilled Syringe Injection-0.5 ml units 0.5 ml 10
Antibiotic Otic Solution (Generic Cortisporin)-10 ml units 10 ml 10
Tetracycline 250 mg Capsules (Achromycin)-100 capsules per 100 3
Water For Injection Sterile-5 ml units 5 ml 30
Zinc Oxide Ointment-1 oz 1 oz 12
Emesis Basin-Each Each 1
Wash Basin Plastic-Large Large 1
Bed Pan Fracture-Each Each 1
Cane Aluminum Adjustable #A756-Each Each 1
Crutches Aluminum Complete-Adult Regular Adult Regular 1
Eye Cup Glass-Each Each 2
Funnel Stainless Steel-6 oz 6 oz 1
Cylinder Glass Double Scale-50 ml 50 ml 1
Cylinder Glass Double Scale-500 ml 500 ml 1
Heating Pad Cara Dry #50-Each Each 1
Hot Water Bottle/Ice Bag 2 Quart-Each Each 1
Stokes Litter Basket-Each Each 1
Magnifying Glass 2-1/2”-Each Each 1
Stretcher Neil Robertson-Each Each 1
Oxygen Unit (Complete) W/Case For “D” Size Tank-Each Each 1
Oxygen Cylinder Size “D” Empty-Each Each 1
Refrigerator Walnut Color-Each Each 1
Restraints Wrist/Ankle Padded Pair-Each Each 1
Straight Jacket-Each Each 1
Bedrails Home Style #32-GF6408 -1-Pair Pair 1
Resuscitator Bag Adult Disp. w/Mask & Tubing-Each Each 1
Inflatable Ring Rubber-Each Each 1
Scale Doctor Plus 0-300 lb. -Each Each 1*
Sphygmomanometer Aneroid #115-Each Each 1
Splint Inflatable Kit-4 per kit Each 1
Finger Splint Padded Assorted Sizes-3-Each Each 2
Sterilizer Dri-Clave 15-1/2×10-1/2×9-1/2 115 Volt-Each Each 1
Stethoscope Black-22” 22” 1
Thermometer Bath Flat Wood #50-1537-Each Each 2
Instrument Tray Stainless Steel-8-1/2 x 3×1-1/2 8-1/2 x 3 x
1-1/2 1
Urinal Male Disposable-Each Each 2
Waste Receptacle Step On 32 Qt White #58-8286-Each Each 1
International Medical Guide For Ships-Each Each 1*
Medical First Aid/Dangerous Goods-Each Each 1*
International Health Regulations-Each Each 1*
Vaccination Certificate Manual (WHO)-Each Each 1
Airway Kit Nasopharyngeal -5 Sizes w/Case 5 Sizes 1
Scalpel Blades #10-Each Each 6
Scalpel Blades #15-Each Each 6
Forceps Dressing Bayonet-Shaped 7”-Each Each 1
Forceps Halsted Mosquito Curved #20-2673-Each Each 2
Forceps Kelly Straight-5-1/2” 5-1/2” 2
Forceps Kelly Curved-5-1/2” 5-1/2” 2
Forceps Splinter-3-1/2” 3-1/2” 1
Forceps Tissue 1×2 teeth-4-1/2” 4-1/2” 1
Scalpel Handle #3-Each Each 2
Scissors Bandage-7-1/2” 7-1/2” 3
Scissors Operating Straight Sharp/Sharp-5-1/2” 5-1/2” 2
Hammer Taylor Type Reflex #15-1305-1-Each Each 1
Needle Holder Mayo-Hager 5-1/2”-Each Each 2
Tape Micropore Paper 2” x 10 yd -Each Each 4
Tape Micropore Paper 1” x 10 yd -Each Each 4
IV Butterfly Needle W/Tubing 19g x 3/4”-12”-Each Each 6
Cotton Tipped Applicators 6”-100 per box 100 2
Elastic Bandage 4” x 4.5 yd -Each Each 12
Elastic Bandage 3” x 4.5 yd -Each Each 12
Elastic Bandage 2” x 4.5 yd -Each Each 12
Elastic Bandage Cotton 2”-Each Each 12
Flexilite Conforming Gauze Bandage 2”x4-1/2’-Each Each 200
Flexilite Conforming Gauze Bandage 6”x4-1/2’-Each Each 40
Flexilite Conforming Gauze Bandage 4”x4-1/2’-Each Each 60
Gauze Telfa “Ouchless” Adhesive Pads 3”x4” Sterile-100 per box 100 30
Band Aid Adhesive Surgical Dressing 8”x6”-Each Each 20
Triangular Bandage-Each Each 4
Surgitube #2 7/8” x 5 yd -Each Each 10
Bandage Spray-3 oz 3 oz 4
Vaseline Dressing 3”x18”-Each Each 5
Vaseline Dressing 3”x9”-Each Each 10
Vaseline Dressing 6” x 36”-Each Each 5
Bandage Compress 4” (1 Per Box)-Each Each 20
Bandage Compress 2” (4 Per Box)-Each Each 3
Bandage Compress 3” (2 Per Box)-Each Each 10
Bottle Plastic-2 oz 2 oz 50
Catheter Urethral –12 Fr 12 Fr 1
Catheter Urethral –14 Fr 14 Fr 1
Catheter Urethral – 6 Fr-Each Each 1
Catheter Urethral – 8 Fr 8 Fr 1
Catheter Urethral – 16 Fr 16 Fr 1
Catheter Tray Urethral – 14 Fr 14 Fr 3
Clinical Record Chart- Each 50
Temperature Chart-50 50 1
Medical Report For Seafarers-Each Each 100*
Cervical Collar Universal-3” 3” 1
Cotton Rolled Sterile-2 oz 2 oz 3
Cotton Rolled Sterile-1/2 oz 1/2 oz 20
Cotton Rolled Sterile-4 oz 4 oz 10
Finger Cots Assorted Sizes Sm., Med., & Large-12 12 1
Penlight Heavy Duty W/batteries-Each Each 1
Surgitube #1 5/8” x 5 yd – Each Each 5
Gloves Latex Surgical “Sterile” Size 8-Each Each 12
Gown Surgical Disposable-Each Each 5
Face Mask W/Elastic Band “Unigloves”-50 per box 50 1
Medicine Cups Plastic 1 oz-100 100 1
Microscope Slides 1×3 Plain-Each Each 100
Body Bag-Each Each 2
Needle Disposable 25g x 5/8”-Each Each 36
Needle Disposable 18g x 1-1/2”-Each Each 18
Needle Disposable 21g x 1-1/2”-Each Each 12
Hematest Reagent Tablets-100 tablets per 100 1
Surgipad Combine Dressing 8”x10” Sterile-Each Each 6
Eye Pad Large Sterile-12 per box 12 1
Gauze Pads Non-Adherent 3”x4” Sterile-100 per box 100 1
Safety Pins Assorted Sizes-50 per 50 each 2
Brush (Surgeons Scrub)-Each Each 2
Condoms Lubricated-Each Each 50
Sheet waterproof 36×72”-Each Each 2
Butterfly Closure Medium-100-Each Each 1
Steri Strip 1/2”x4”-6 per 6 2
Sutures Chromic Gut 2-0 27” FS1 Needle #637G-Each Each 12
Sutures Silk 3-0 18” FS-2 Needle #684G-Each Each 24
Sutures Chromic Gut 3-0 27” FS2 Needle #636G-Each Each 12
Sutures Nylon 5-0 18” FS-2 Needle #661G-Each Each 12
Suture Removal Kit-Each Each 1
Glass Syringe 2 ml-Each Each 4
Glass Syringe 20 ml-Each Each 2
Glass Syringe 5 ml-Each Each 4
Syringe & Needle 3 cc 21g x 1-1/2”-Each Each 50
Syringe & Needle 5 cc 21g x 1-1/2”-Each Each 30
Syringe & Needle 3 cc 25g x 5/8”-Each Each 50
Chemstrip 9 -100 100 1
Clinitest Tablets/Urine Sugar-36 tablets per 36 3
Kleenex-250 sheets per box 250 per box 6
Thermometer Dual Scale Oral-Each Each 6
Tourniquet Grafkette Adult Size-Each Each 1
Tongue Depressors Wood 6” Senior-Each Each 100
Towels Poly-lined 18”x26”-Each Each 24
Towels Cotton 18”x33”-12 Each Each 12
Sterilized Pouches Tower Self Seal 3.5×8”-100 per 100 1
“Sharps” Disposal Box-Each Each 1

Table II

INTERNATIONAL MEDICAL GUIDE FOR SHIPS
WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO) B-LIST

Product Size Quantity
Aspirin 325 mg Tablets-100 tablets per 100 3
Alcohol 70% Rubbing Isopropyl-16 oz bottles 16 oz 2
Aluminum Acetic Acid 2% Otic Solution (Domeboro) 60 ml units 60 ml 2
Alumina and Magnesia Tablets (Maalox)-100 tablets per 100 3
Aminophylline 500 mg Suppositories Disc By Mfg.-10 10 1
Amitriptyline 25 mg Tablets (Elavil)-100 tablets per 100 1
Ampicillin 250 mg Capsules-100 capsules per 100 1
Hemorrhoidal Suppositories-12 per unit 12 1
Vitamin C 250 mg Tablets (Ascorbic Acid)-100 tablets per 100 1
Atropine Sulfate 0.4 mg/ml Injection-1 ml units 1 ml 10
Tolnaftate 1% Cream (Tinactin)-15 gm tube 15 m 2
Calamine Lotion-4 oz 4 oz 1
Hibiclens Solution (Chlorhexidine Gluconate)-16 oz 16 oz 1
Charcoal, Activated Powder-227g 227g 1
Chloroquine 250 mg Tablets-100 tablets per 100 1
Chlorphenamine Maleate 4 mg Tablets-100 tablets per 100 1
Diphenhydramine 50 mg/ml Injection (Benadryl)-1 ml units 1 ml 10
Chlorpromazine 25 mg Tablets (Thorazine)-Each Each 40
Chlorpromazine 25 mg/ml Injection (Thorazine)-1 ml units 1 ml 10
Clove Oil-1 oz 1 oz 1
Acetaminophen w/Codeine 30 mg Tablets (Tylenol)-100 tablets per 100 1
Meclizine 25 mg Tablets (Antivert)-100 tablets per 100 1
Diazepam 5 mg Tablets (Valium)-100 tablets per 100 1
Dimercaprol 100 mg/ml Injection-2 ml units 2 ml 2
Epinephrine 1 mg/ml Injection-1 ml units 1 ml 10
Erythromycin 250 mg Tablets-100 tablets per 100 1
Tetracaine 0.5% Ophth Solution (Pontocaine)-15 ml units 15 ml 1
Triple Antibiotic Ophth Solution-10 ml units 10 ml 2
Triple Antibiotic Ophth Ointment (Neosporin)-3.5 gm 3.5 gm 3
Eye Wash Sterile-4 oz bottle 4 oz 1
Nitro-Quick 0.4 mg Sublingual Tablets-25 tablets per 25 1
Hydrocortisone 1% Ointment-1 oz 1 oz 2
Ichthammol 10% Ointment-1 oz 1 oz 4
Insect Repellent Pump-2 oz 2 oz 6
Iodine Tincture 2% Mild-1 oz 1 oz 5
Lindane Lotion (Kwell)-2 oz 2 oz 2
Milk Of Magnesia-12 oz 12 oz 2
Metronidazole 250 mg Tablets (Flagyl)-100 tablets per 100 2
Miconazole Vaginal Cream (Micatin)-45 gm 45 gm 2
Miconazole Vaginal Suppositories 7 W/Applicator-7 per 7 2
Mineral Oil Heavy-16 oz 16 oz 1
Morphine Sulfate 10 mg/ml Injection-1 ml units 1 ml 1
Triple Antibiotic Ointment (Neosporin)-1 oz 1 oz 10
Electrolyte Tablets-100 tablets per 100 1
Oxygen Refill Size “D”-Each Each 1
Acetaminophen 500 mg Tablets (Tylenol)-100 tablets per 100 1
Petrolatum Ointment-1 oz 1 oz 4
Phenobarbital 30 mg Tablets-100 tablets per 100 1
Penicillin VK 250 mg Tablets-100 tablets per 100 1
Pilocarpine 2% Ophth Solution (Isopto Carpine)-15 ml units 15 ml 1
Potassium Permanganate Crystal-500g 500g 1
Probenecid 500 mg Tablets (Benemid)-100 tablets per 100 1
Ampicillin 500 mg Injection-Each Each 10
Proguanil 100 mg (Pauludrine)-100 100 1
Albuterol 17g Inhalation (Proventil)-200 Metered 200 Metered 1
Sodium Chloride 0.9% IV Injection-1000 ml units 1000 ml 2
IV Solution Set Vented W/Injection Site 15 drop/ml Each Each 2
IV Solution Set 15 Drops/ml Macrodrip -Each Each 2
Thermotabs (Enteric Coated Salt Tablets)-100 tablets per 100 10
Sulfamethoxazole/Trimeth 400 mg/80 mg Tabs (Bactrim)-100 tablets per 100 1
Baby Powder J & J (Talc)-4 oz 4 oz 3
Antibiotic Otic Solution (Generic Cortisporin)-10 ml units 10 ml 5
Tetracycline 250 mg Capsules (Achromycin)-100 capsules per 100 1
Water For Injection Sterile-5 ml units 5 ml 20
Zinc Oxide Ointment-1 oz 1 oz 3
Emesis Basin-Each Each 1
Wash Basin Plastic-Large Large 1
Bed Pan Fracture-Each Each 1
Cane Aluminum Adjustable #A756-Each Each 1
Eye Cup Glass-Each Each 1
Funnel Stainless Steel-6 oz 6 oz 1
Cylinder Glass Double Scale-50 ml 50 ml 1
Cylinder Glass Double Scale-500 ml 500 ml 1
Heating Pad Cara Dry #50-Each Each 1
Hot Water Bottle/Ice Bag 2 Quart-Each Each 1
Stokes Litter Basket-Each Each 1
Magnifying Glass 2-1/2”-Each Each 1
Stretcher Neil Robertson-Each Each 1
Oxygen Unit (Complete) W/Case For “D” Size Tank-Each Each 1
Oxygen Cylinder Size “D” Empty-Each Each 1
Refrigerator Walnut Color-Each Each 1
Restraints Wrist/Ankle Padded Pair-Each Each 1
Straight Jacket-Each Each 1
Bedrails Home Style #32-GF6408 -1-Pair Pair 1
Resuscitator Bag Adult Disp. W/Mask & Tubing-Each Each 1
Sphygmomanometer Aneroid #115-Each Each 1
Splint Inflatable Kit-4 per kit Each 1
Finger Splint Padded Assorted Sizes-3-Each Each 2
Sterilizer Dri-Clave 15-1/2×10-1/2×9-1/2 115 Volt-Each Each 1
Stethoscope Black-22” 22” 1
Thermometer Bath Flat Wood #50-1537-Each Each 1
Urinal Male Disposable-Each Each 1
International Medical Guide For Ships-Each Each 1
Medical First Aid/Dangerous Goods-Each Each 1
International Health Regulations-Each Each 1
Airway Kit Nasopharyngeal -5 Sizes w/Case 5 Sizes w/Case 1
Scalpel Blades #10-Each Each 6
Scalpel Blades #15-Each Each 6
Forceps Dressing Bayonet-Shaped 7”-Each Each 1
Forceps Splinter-3-1/2” 3-1/2” 1
Forceps Tissue 1×2 teeth-4-1/2” 4-1/2” 1
Scalpel Handle #3-Each Each 1
Scissors Bandage-7-1/2” 7-1/2” 1
Scissors Operating Straight Sharp/Sharp-5-1/2” 5-1/2” 1
Needle Holder Mayo-Hager 5-1/2”-Each Each 1
Tape Micropore Paper 2” x 10 yd -Each Each 3
Tape Micropore Paper 1” x 10 yd -Each Each 3
IV Butterfly Needle W/Tubing 19g x 3/4”-12”-Each Each 1
Cotton Tipped Applicators 6”-100 per box 100 1
Elastic Bandage 3” x 4.5 yd -Each Each 6
Elastic Bandage 2” x 4.5 yd -Each Each 6
Elastic Bandage Cotton 2”-Each Each 12
Flexilite Conforming Gauze Bandage 2”x4-1/2’-Each Each 100
Flexilite Conforming Gauze Bandage 6”x4-1/2’-Each Each 20
Flexilite Conforming Gauze Bandage 4”x4-1/2’-Each Each 30
Gauze Telfa “Ouchless” Adhesive Pads 3”x4” Sterile-100 per box 100 15
Band Aid Adhesive Surgical Dressing 8”x6”-Each Each 10
Triangular Bandage-Each Each 2
Surgitube #2 7/8” x 5 yd -Each Each 5
Bandage Spray-3 oz 3 oz 2
Vaseline Dressing 3”x18”-Each Each 2
Vaseline Dressing 3”x9”-Each Each 5
Vaseline Dressing 6” x 36”-Each Each 2
Bandage Compress 4” (1 Per Box)-Each Each 10
Bandage Compress 2” (4 Per Box)-Each Each 3
Bandage Compress 3” (2 Per Box)-Each Each 5
Bottle Plastic-2 oz 2 oz 20
Catheter Urethral –12 Fr 12 Fr 1
Catheter Urethral –14 Fr 14 Fr 1
Catheter Urethral – 6 Fr-Each Each 1
Catheter Urethral – 8 Fr 8 Fr 1
Catheter Urethral – 16 Fr 16 Fr 1
Catheter Tray Urethral – 14 Fr 14 Fr 1
Clinical Record Chart-Each Each 10
Temperature Chart-50 50 1
Medical Report For Seafarers-Each Each 50
Cotton Rolled Sterile-2 oz 2 oz 1
Cotton Rolled Sterile-1/2 oz 1/2 oz 10
Cotton Rolled Sterile-4 oz 4 oz 5
Finger Cots Assorted Sizes Sm., Med., & Large-12 12 1
Penlight Heavy Duty W/batteries-Each Each 1
Surgitube #1 5/8” x 5 yd – Each Each 2
Face Mask W/Elastic Band “Unigloves”-50 per box 50 1
Medicine Cups Plastic 1 oz-100 100 1
Microscope Slides 1×3 Plain-Each Each 50
Body Bag-Each Each 1
Needle Disposable 25g x 5/8”-Each Each 6
Needle Disposable 18g x 1-1/2”-Each Each 6
Needle Disposable 21g x 1-1/2”-Each Each 6
Surgipad Combine Dressing 8”x10” Sterile-Each Each 3
Eye Pad Large Sterile-12 per box 12 1
Gauze Pads Non-Adherent 3”x4” Sterile Each 50
Safety Pins Assorted Sizes-50 per 50 1
Brush (Surgeons Scrub)-Each Each 2
Condoms Lubricated-Each Each 50
Sheet waterproof 36×72”-Each Each 1
Butterfly Closure Medium-100-Each Each 1
Steri Strip 1/2”x4”-6 6 1
Sutures Silk 3-0 18” FS-2 Needle #684G-Each Each 12
Glass Syringe 2 ml-Each Each 2
Glass Syringe 20 ml-Each Each 1
Glass Syringe 5 ml-Each Each 2
Syringe & Needle 3 cc 21g x 1-1/2”-Each Each 25
Syringe & Needle 5 cc 21g x 1-1/2”-Each Each 25
Syringe & Needle 3 cc 25g x 5/8”-Each Each 25
Chemstrip 9 -100 100 1
Kleenex-250 sheets per box 250 per box 3
Thermometer Dual Scale Oral-Each Each 2
Tourniquet Grafkette Adult Size-Each Each 1
Tongue Depressors Wood 6” Senior-Each Each 50
Towels Poly-lined 18”x26”-Each Each 12
“Sharps” Disposal Box-Each Each 1

Table III

INTERNATIONAL MEDICAL GUIDE FOR SHIPS
WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO) C-LIST

Product Size Quantity
Aspirin 325 mg Tablets-100 tablets per 100 2
Alcohol 70% Rubbing Isopropyl-16 oz 16 oz 1
Aluminum Acetic Acid 2% Otic Solution (Domeboro) 60 ml units 60 ml 2
Alumina and Magnesia Tablets (Maalox)-100 tablets per 100 3
Calamine Lotion-4 oz 4 oz 1
Hibiclens Solution (Chlorhexidine Gluconate)-16 oz 16 oz 1
Charcoal, Activated Powder-227g 227g 1
Chloroquine 250 mg Tablets-100 tablets per 100 1
Chlorpromazine 25 mg Tablets (Thorazine)-Each Each 20
Clove Oil-1 oz 1 oz 1
Meclizine 25 mg Tablets (Antivert)-100 tablets per 100 1
Dimercaprol 100 mg/ml Injection-2 ml units 2 ml 1
Epinephrine 1 mg/ml Injection-1 ml units 1 ml 10
Triple Antibiotic Ophth Solution-10 ml units 10 ml 1
Triple Antibiotic Ophth Ointment (Neosporin)-3.5 gm 3.5 gm 1
Eye Wash Sterile-4 oz 4 oz 1
Nitro-Quick 0.4 mg Sublingual Tablets-25 tablets per 25 1
Hydrocortisone 1% Ointment-1 oz 1 oz 2
Ichthammol 10% Ointment-1 oz 1 oz 1
Insect Repellent Pump-2 oz 2 oz 2
Iodine Tincture 2% Mild-1 oz 1 oz 2
Milk Of Magnesia-12 oz 12 oz 2
Triple Antibiotic Ointment (Neosporin)-1 oz 1 oz 5
Electrolyte Tablets-100 tablets per 100 1
Acetaminophen 500 mg Tablets (Tylenol)-100 tablets per 100 1
Petrolatum Ointment-1 oz 1 oz 4
Proguanil 100 mg (Pauludrine)-100 100 1
Thermotabs (Enteric Coated Salt Tablets)-100 tablets per 100 10
Baby Powder J & J (Talc)-4 oz 4 oz 3
Antibiotic Otic Solution (Generic Cortisporin)-10 ml units 10 ml 1
Zinc Oxide Ointment-1 oz 1 oz 3
Eye Cup Glass-Each Each 1
Funnel Stainless Steel-6 oz 6 oz 1
Cylinder Glass Double Scale-50 ml 50 ml 1
Cylinder Glass Double Scale-500 ml 500 ml 1
Stokes Litter Basket-Each Each 1
Resuscitator Bag Adult Disp. W/Mask & Tubing-Each Each 1
Sphygmomanometer Aneroid #115-Each Each 1
Splint Inflatable Kit-4 per kit Each 1
Finger Splint Padded Assorted Sizes-3-Each Each 2
Stethoscope Black-22” 22” 1
International Medical Guide For Ships-Each Each 1
Medical First Aid/Dangerous Goods-Each Each 1
International Health Regulations-Each Each 1
Airway Kit Nasopharyngeal -5 Sizes w/Case 5 Sizes w/Case 1
Forceps Dressing Bayonet-Shaped 7”-Each Each 1
Forceps Splinter-3-1/2” 3-1/2” 1
Forceps Tissue 1×2 teeth-4-1/2” 4-1/2” 1
Scissors Bandage-7-1/2” 7-1/2” 1
Scissors Operating Straight Sharp/Sharp-5-1/2” 5-1/2” 1
Tape Micropore Paper 2” x 10 yd -Each Each 1
Tape Micropore Paper 1” x 10 yd -Each Each 1
Cotton Tipped Applicators 6”-100 per box 100 1
Elastic Bandage 3” x 4.5 yd -Each Each 6
Elastic Bandage 2” x 4.5 yd -Each Each 6
Elastic Bandage Cotton 2”-Each Each 12
Flexilite Conforming Gauze Bandage 2”x4-1/2’-Each Each 100
Flexilite Conforming Gauze Bandage 6”x4-1/2’-Each Each 10
Flexilite Conforming Gauze Bandage 4”x4-1/2’-Each Each 30
Gauze Telfa “Ouchless” Adhesive Pads 3”x4” Sterile-100 per 100 10
Band Aid Adhesive Surgical Dressing 8”x6”-Each Each 5
Triangular Bandage-Each Each 1
Surgitube #2 7/8” x 5 yd -Each Each 2
Bandage Spray-3 oz 3 oz 1
Vaseline Dressing 3”x18”-Each Each 1
Vaseline Dressing 3”x9”-Each Each 2
Vaseline Dressing 6” x 36”-Each Each 1
Bandage Compress 4” (1 Per Box)-Each Each 5
Bandage Compress 2” (4 Per Box)-Each Each 2
Bandage Compress 3” (2 Per Box)-Each Each 5
Medical Report For Seafarers-Each Each 50
Cotton Rolled Sterile-2 oz 2 oz 1
Cotton Rolled Sterile-1/2 oz 1/2 oz 5
Cotton Rolled Sterile-4 oz 4 oz 5
Finger Cots Assorted Sizes Sm., Med., & Large-12 12 1
Penlight Heavy Duty W/batteries-Each Each 1
Surgitube #1 5/8” x 5 yd – Each Each 1
Medicine Cups Plastic 1 oz-100 100 1
Surgipad Combine Dressing 8”x10” Sterile-Each Each 3
Eye Pad Large Sterile-12 per 12 1
Gauze Pads Non-Adherent 3”x4” Sterile Each 20
Safety Pins Assorted Sizes-50 per 50 1
Brush (Surgeons Scrub)-Each Each 1
Condoms Lubricated-Each Each 30
Sheet waterproof 36×72”-Each Each 1
Butterfly Closure Medium-100-Each Each 1
Syringe & Needle 3 cc 21g x 1-1/2”-Each Each 10
Syringe & Needle 5 cc 21g x 1-1/2”-Each Each 10
Syringe & Needle 3 cc 25g x 5/8”-Each Each 10
Kleenex-250 sheets per box 250 per box 1
Thermometer Dual Scale Oral-Each Each 2
Tourniquet Grafkette Adult Size-Each Each 1
Tongue Depressors Wood 6” Senior-Each Each 20
“Sharps” Disposal Box-Each Each 1

Table IV

Product Size Quantity
Commercially Available First Aid Kit with at least
Meclizine 25 mg Tablets (Antivert)-50 tablets per 50 1
Acetaminophen 500 mg Tablets (Tylenol)-50 tablets per 50 1
Gloves, Latex Surgical “Sterile” Size 8 Pair 4
Stethoscope 22” 1
Medical First Aid Manual Each 1*
Forceps Dressing Bayonet-Shaped 7” Each 1*
Scissors Bandage-7 7-1/2” 1*
Flexilite Conforming Gauze Bandage 2”x4-1/2’ Each 6
Flexilite Conforming Gauze Bandage 6”x4-1/2’ Each 2
Band Aid, Medicated in assorted sizes Each 20
Triangular Bandage Each 2
Cotton Rolled Sterile 2 oz 2
Surgipad Combine Dressing 8”x10” Sterile Each 2
Safety Pins Assorted Sizes-50 per 50 1
Butterfly Closure Medium Each 10
Thermometer, Ordinary Range Clinical Each 1*

* Only one (1) required if quantities must be doubled.

Recommended additional equipment

Product Size Quantity
Face masks disposable-Each Each 6
Plastic measuring jug ½ liter size ½ liter 1
Disposable paper towels-units of 100 each 100 1
Latex gloves surgical quality – sterile (large) Large 5 pairs
Waterproof plastic sheeting, size 1m x 2m-Each 1m x 2m 1
“Sharps” disposal box-Each Each 1
Lotion bowl (Size at least 200mm x 90mm, stainless steel or sterilisable plastic, to be marked “medical”) 200mm x 90mm 1
Kidney dish (Size 250mm stainless steel or sterilizable plastic) 250mm 1
Magnifying glass 7.5 cm diameter on handle 7.5 cm dia. 1
Nail brush-Each Each 1
Stretcher equipment (A system for trauma management, i.e., immobilization and stretcher equipment most suited for treatment on the vessel concerned) Each 1

Table V

“EMERGENCY MEDICAL KIT/BAG” FOR RO-RO PASSENGER SHIPS
NOT NORMALLY CARRYING A MEDICAL DOCTOR

Medical Equipment
Airway – Ventilation:
Oxygen giving set – (small portable) 1
Manual Resuscitator: (bag-valve – mask-resuscitator complete with oxygen reservoir and facemasks in 2 sizes 1
Guedel Airway in 3 sizes
Nebulizer with aerosol mask and oxygen tubing 1
Manual suction pump with: 1
Yankauer suction catheters 2
Flexible catheters FG 14 size 2
Laryngoscope with McIntosh spatula small, medium, large 1
Endotracheal tubes range of sizes
Magill-forceps 1
Flexible introducer for endotracheal tube 1
Diagnostic:
Anaeroid Sphygmomanometer 1
Stethoscope 1
Diagnostic penlight 1
Blood test sticks – glucose 1 set
Blood test sticks – sterile 1 set
Electro-Cardiogram Monitor with telemetry facility *
Automatic External Defibrillator (AED) *
Infusion – Injection:
Disposable infusion set 2
IV indwelling cannulas (G 16, 18, 20) 2 of each
Adhesive dressing for indwelling cannulas 2
Disposable syringes 2, 5, 10 ml 2 of each
Sterile disposable Needles 6 (various sizes)
Tourniquet 1
“Sharps” disposable box 1
Sterile/antiseptic swabs 5
Miscellaneous:
Scissors (EMT shears) 1
Disposable gloves 2 pairs
Thoracic drainage set + dual suction and discharge valve *

Medicines
Cardiovascular:
Atropine (1mg ampoule) 3
Adrenaline/Epinephrine (1 mg / 1 ml ampoule) 5
Adrenaline/Epinephrine (10 mg / 1 ml ampoule) 5
Furosemide (20 mg ampoule 4
Glyceryl trinitrate (spray) 1
Anti-Arrhythmics (If ECG monitoring available): *
Digoxin, Lidocaine, Amiodarone, Adenosine, Magnesium Sulphate *
Beta Blockers: Propanolol or equivalent (Ampoule) 1
Anti-Hypertension: Urapidil (ampoule) 1
Anticoagulants / Thrombolytics:
Heparin or alternative (ampoule) 1
Acetyl salicylic acid (250 – 500 mg) 1
Respiratory:
Salbutamol aerosol inhaler unit 1
Salbutamol for nebulization (5 mg ampoule) 5
Beclomethasone Diproponate (Aerosol Inhaler) 1
Aminophylline and/or Salbutamol (IV) (ampoule) 1
Steroids: Methlprednisolone (250 mg) / Hydrocortisone (100 mg) (ampoule) 1
Antihistamines: Promethazine or equivalent (25 mg ampoule) 1
Analgesics:
Morphine sulphate (10 mg ampoule) 3
Ketamine (50 mg ampoule) 2
Tramadol or alternative (100 mg ampoule) 2
Sedatives:
Diazepam injection (10 mg ampoule) or equivalent 2
Neuroleptic: chlorpromazine (25 mg ampoule) or equivalent 2
Naloxone injection (0.4 mg ampoule) *
Antiemetic: Metoclopramide (10 mg ampoule) or equivalent 1
IV Anesthetics:
Etomidate (20 mg ampoule) or equivalent 2
Midazolam (10 mg ampoule) 2
Suxamethonium (100 mg ampoule) 1
IV Fluids:
Ringer solution or NaCl solution 0.9% 1000 ml
HEA or Modified Gelatine Infusion Solution (for plasma substitution) 1000 ml
Hypertonic Glucose for IV infusion (30% – 50%) 50 ml
Physiologic saline (10 ml ampoule) 2

First Aid Kit
• One (1) to be included or attached to the Emergency Medical Kit/Bag.
• Contents as defined in National regulations.

ANNEX 11

PRIVATE YACHT CERTIFICATE OF REGISTRY
Certificate Number

Republic of the Marshall Islands

Office of the Maritime Administrator

Private Yacht Certificate of Registry

OFFICIAL NUMBER: CALL LETTERS: SERVICE:
VESSEL NAME: HOME PORT:

THIS IS TO CERTIFY THAT pursuant to the provisions of the Marshall Islands Maritime Act 1990, [Name of Authorized Signatory] having submitted the required declaration of ownership does depose and say that:
NAME RESIDENCE CITIZENSHIP PROPORTION

is (are) the sole owner(s) of the herein named and described vessel

FORMER NAME: YEAR BUILT:
BUILT BY: PLACE BUILT:
CLASS SOCIETY: GROSS TONS: NET TONS:
ENGINE MANUFACTURER:
NO. AND TYPE OF ENGINES: PROPELLING POWER (KW):
NUMBER OF MASTS: NUMBER OF DECKS: HULL MATERIAL:
LENGTH: BREADTH: DEPTH: HEIGHT (if applicable):

and WHEREAS the Maritime Administrator, on behalf of the Government of the Marshall Islands approved the application of the aforesaid owner for registration of the vessel and whereas the owner has complied with the requirements for registration and submitted same, the vessel is therefore duly registered under the Laws and Flag of the Republic of the Marshall Islands.

This Certificate of Registry and all rights and privileges accorded thereunder, shall remain valid on a continuous basis, provided the owner has complied with the requirements for revalidation and a copy of the current year’s Annual Tonnage Tax Receipt is attached hereto.

Issued by the Authority of the Government of the Republic of the Marshall Islands at
this day of , 20 .

Guy E. C. Maitland
Senior Deputy Commissioner

ANNEX 12

PRIVATE YACHT DECLARATION OF PRIVATE USE

Office of the
Maritime Administrator REPUBLIC OF THE MARSHALL ISLANDS
MARITIME ADMINISTRATOR

TELEPHONE: FAX:
EMAIL: @register-iri.com WEBSITE: http://www.register-iri.com

DECLARATION OF PRIVATE USE

AFFIDAVIT RE: NON-CARRIAGE OF PASSENGERS OR CARGO FOR HIRE, CHARTERING AND SALE OF YACHT OR INTEREST IN OWNING ENTITY
I, having been sworn,
depose and say that I am of
(title)
, owner or prospective owner of the yacht

to be registered in The Republic of the Marshall Islands

under Official Number ; and that such is a pleasure yacht which complies with the

requirements of a Private Yacht as defined in Section 1.12 of the Marshall Islands Maritime Regulations; and further:

(a) That said yacht will not be offered for any type of charter operation; or be engaged in trade for the transportation of merchandise or the carriage of passengers for reward, remuneration or gain (other than as a contribution to the actual cost of the yacht or its operation for the period of the voyage or excursion).

(b) That the owner further understands that under paragraph (a) the Registry permits a private yacht of 18 meters or greater in length to be demise/bareboat, time, or voyage chartered out for up to 84 days in any one (1) calendar year to allow for the yacht owner to recoup some of his/her operating expenses. This chartering privilege exempts the yacht from having to be registered as a commercial yacht. However those who wish to charter their private yacht of 18 meters or greater in length in accordance with these privileges will be required to satisfy the following additional requirements:

i. At time of application for registry in the Marshall Islands, the owner will declare on the application form, MI-101PY, the intention to avail the yacht of the 84 days of chartering per calendar year.

ii. If the owner declares his intention to charter the yacht, it must pass an enhanced survey conducted by a Marshall Islands Appointed Representative. The enhanced survey will address the yacht’s equivalency to commercial equipment standards for life saving apparatus, safety and fire-fighting equipment in addition to the Fit for Purpose survey.

iii. Effective 1 January 2010, all private yachts engaged in chartering will be required to have a Safety Management System approved by a Marshall Islands Appointed Representative. It is strongly recommended that an Approved Safety Management System be put in place as soon as possible.

iv. All private yachts of 80 gross tons or greater, or 24 meters or greater in length, and engaged in chartering, must apply for, and operate under, a Minimum Safe Manning Certificate, MI-282-10, which requires crew members to hold Marshall Islands

Rev. 7/08 page 1 of 2 MI-127
Certificates of Competency or Marshall Islands endorsements on their national licenses for the position in which they are serving aboard the yacht. Additionally, all crew members must hold a valid Marshall Islands Seafarer’s Identification and Record Book, which requires the minimum STCW training.

v. Private yachts of 18 meters or greater in length, engaged in chartering, must have annual compliance verification by way of an Appointed Representative’s survey to maintain chartering privileges.

vii. Demise/Bareboat Charter Party and/or the Yacht Service Agreement must have specific language clearly stating that a “competent master and crew will operate the yacht in accordance with the Marshall Islands Law and Regulations.”

viii. Proper P&I and Hull and Machinery insurance coverage in place for the period and scope of the charter.
(c) That the owner understands that in the event of the sale of the yacht or the interest in the owning entity, the purchaser will have no automatic right to re-register the yacht in their ownership or to continue the registration of the yacht under the Marshall Islands Flag.
(d) That the owner understands that if it is determined after registration of the yacht that this Declaration has been deliberately and fraudulently filed with the Maritime Administrator, it will result in the immediate termination of the Private Yacht Certificate of Registry and the striking of the yacht from the registry.

(signature)

Subscribed and sworn to before me
this day of 20
at

Signature of Notary Public, Deputy Commissioner or Special Agent

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT FROM MASTER

Master, [YACHT NAME]

c/o [Company Name]

Marshall Islands

Dear Captain,

Please acknowledge receipt and understanding of this Declaration of Private Use by signing the below and promptly returning this document to the Office of the Maritime Administrator at the office address shown in the letterhead.

Sincerely,

[Signator]

[Signator Title]

Office of the Maritime Administrator
Republic of the Marshall Islands

Receipt is herewith acknowledged:

Date: Signature of Master:

Rev. 7/08 page 2 of 2 MI-127
ANNEX 13

SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM FOR YACHTS UNDER 500 GT

1.0 INTRODUCTION

1.1 The purpose of this Annex is to provide guidance on how to develop and implement an effective management system for commercial yachts under 500 GT, where full certification to the International Safety Management (ISM) Code and the International Ship and Port Facility Security Code (ISPS) is not a requirement.

1.2 The objectives of the Annex are to ensure safety at sea, prevention of human injury or loss of life, avoidance of damage to the environment, and security of people and property.

2.0 GENERAL

2.1 Each operator should create a proper working environment, which should include the following:

2.1.1 Health, Safety, Security, and Environmental Protection Policy

.1 This must address the issues of health, safety, security, and the environment as they affect the company and its staff, both ashore and afloat. The objectives of the Company should be:

(a) to provide for safe practices in yacht operation and a safe working environment;
(b) to establish safeguards against all identified risks; and
(c) to continuously improve management skills of personnel ashore and aboard yachts, including preparing for emergencies related both to health, safety, security, and environmental protection.

2.2 Procedures to ensure safe operation of yachts in compliance with the regulations and rules.

2.2.1 The management system should ensure:

(a) compliance with mandatory rules and regulations; and
(b) that applicable codes, guidelines, and standards recommended by the Organization, Administrations, Classification Societies, and maritime industry organizations are taken into account.

2.2.2 The company shall establish procedures to ensure that safe working practices are carried out in the operation of the yacht. These may be in the form of checklists which can be followed by all personnel.

2.2.3 For some yachts, it may be appropriate to have permanently exhibited checklists, e.g. in the wheelhouse for navigational items. Alternatively, in a smaller yacht, the record could take any suitable form such as a diary as distinct from a specially printed logbook.

2.3 Lines of communication between personnel, ashore and afloat.

2.3.1 Responsibility and authority of each employee should be clear. This may be best illustrated in a simple diagram, showing who reports to whom.

2.4 Procedures for reporting accidents and incidents.

2.4.1 The requirement for reporting accidents should be well understood by all personnel and in so doing improve the safety and security culture practiced on board.

2.5 Procedures for responding to emergency situations.

2.5.1 There should be clearly stated procedures for responding to emergency situations. These may include but not be limited to:

• fire
• collision
• grounding
• security / violent act
• main propulsion or steering failure
• man overboard

2.5.2 Checklists may be useful in this regard.

3.0 HEALTH, SAFETY, SECURITY, and ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION POLICY

3.1 One or more competent persons should be delegated to take responsibility for health, safety, security, and environmental protection. That person/persons should be clearly identified. It is the responsibility of the owner/operator to ensure that the policy is complied with, and that the responsibilities are understood.

3.2 The company/owner should develop a policy on prevention of alcohol and drug abuse.

3.3 All personnel both ashore and afloat have a duty to take care of themselves and other persons who may be affected by their acts or omissions.

3.4 It is essential that, in the event of an emergency, there is the ability to communicate with the emergency services via a shore base. The shore base may be the company office ashore, the local Coastguard, Police, or Fire Station, or another office as may be agreed between the yacht and the shore base.

4.0 RESPONSIBILITIES AND AUTHORITY

4.1 The Master must have authority at all times, to make decisions with regard to the safety and security of the yacht and the persons on board. To ensure that there is no ambiguity regarding the authority of the Master, there should be a simple written statement to this effect. It should emphasize the Master’s overriding authority and the responsibility to make decisions with respect to health, safety, security, and pollution prevention and to request the assistance as may be necessary.

5.0 RESOURCES, PERSONNEL, AND TRAINING

5.1 All personnel should receive training appropriate to the tasks they are assigned and undertake. It is the responsibility of the company/owner to ensure that this training is given, and that the personnel have an understanding of the relevant regulations and rules.

5.2 As a minimum, this means:

• for the Master, the relevant qualifications;
• for the crew, relevant qualifications and any additional training appropriate to their designated duties.

5.3 Prior to the first occasion of working on the yacht, each employee must receive appropriate familiarization training and proper instruction in onboard procedures. This could include, but not necessarily be, limited to:

• mooring and unmooring;
• launching and recovery of survival craft;
• evacuation from all areas of the yacht;
• donning of lifejackets;
• use and handling of firefighting equipment; and
• security prevention / response.

6.0 ONBOARD PROCEDURES

6.1 Simple procedures should be developed for the operation of the yacht. These should include, but not be limited to:

• testing of equipment, including steering gear, prior to commencing a passage;
• navigation and handling of the yacht;
• maintenance routines;
• bunkering operations;
• watertight / weathertight integrity;
• stability of the yacht;
• conduct of passengers and crew while on board; and
• security of the yacht.

7.0 EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

7.1 The potential emergencies likely to be encountered by the yacht should be considered. Drills should then be carried out in the handling of these emergencies and evacuation from the yacht.

7.2 Where possible, all personnel should be involved in these drills, both ashore and afloat.

7.3 The roles and responsibilities of all personnel in an emergency situation should be defined.

7.4 The drills should be recorded. The names of those who participated should also be documented.

8.0 REPORTING OF ACCIDENTS

8.1 Yachts operating under this Code are required to report any accidents to the Administration and the company must therefore have a procedure in place. Additionally, all accidents and near accidents should be recorded and reported to the operator/owner, who should implement corrective and preventive action.

9.0 MAINTENANCE OF THE YACHT AND ITS EQUIPMENT

9.1 Maintenance of the yacht and equipment is an essential ingredient of safety and security management. The equipment should be checked and tested daily when in use, in addition to the tests referred to in the ONBOARD PROCEDURES section of the Code.

9.2 There should be procedures for a more detailed inspection and maintenance program of the yacht and equipment.

9.3 The frequency of the inspections should be determined by the owner/operator, but every event should be recorded, as applicable.

9.4 A checklist could be employed as an aide for the inspection of equipment.

10.0 VERIFICATION, REVIEW, AND EVALUATION

10.1 Every company/owner should undertake a review of the management system of all yachts at least once per twelve months.

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